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Bag or Bay-g? Understanding Wisconsin's Accent... As Best We Can

Bubbler Talk receives a lot of submissions asking about the way Milwaukeeans talk: What’s with Milwaukee saying ‘yet’ in place of ‘still’?, Why do people here say ‘New BER-lin,’ instead of ‘New Ber-LIN,’ like the city in Germany?, What’s with the local saying ‘a horse apiece’?

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Marti Mikkelson

A number of cities are going all-out in efforts to lure Amazon. There’s a big prize at stake. The online retail giant is planning to build a second headquarters, which could create up to 50,000 jobs. Milwaukee and Waukesha are among the communities expressing interest – but in a far more low-key way.

Janna / Fotolia

October is prime apple picking season in Wisconsin. Orchards not far at all from Milwaukee’s city center allow people to pick their own and for many families doing so is a rite of passage.

Wisconsin Foodie host and food contributor, Kyle Cherek, is all about good food. And he says apples certainly qualify.

"Wisconsin is an ideal place to grow these things between our sun, between our good soil, between our great source of water and then the crisp nights," explains Cherek. "We're really ideal for this things that came from the other side of the world originally."

Renaissance Theaterworks Facebook

The stated mission of Tonia Sina’s organization, Intimacy Directors International, is to “create safe places for dangerous work." The dangerous work in question is intimacy on stage, which at first glance might not seem terribly dangerous. But if not handled correctly, intimate scenes can place actors in awkward, uncomfortable, or even abusive situations - even when no malice was intended.

Courtesy of the City of Milwaukee

Low-income public housing projects used to be thought of as islands, often cut off from the rest of city life. They were densely populated, high-rise apartment complexes, often troubled by gangs, drugs and other criminal activities. But over the last decade or two, public housing design has shifted. High rises are giving way to a more neighborhood-based approach.

Kathy Wittman

The Florentine Opera kicks off its fall season in a decidedly lighthearted mood. Franz Lehár’s operetta, The Merry Widow, premiered in Vienna in 1905 and has been wildly popular on stages across the world since then. The story concerns a wealthy widow, a series of misunderstandings between her and a long lost love, and attempts to hang onto her money by marrying her to the “right” man.

Milwaukee Bucks

The Milwaukee Bucks open their NBA season this evening in Boston, against the Celtics.  They’ll play their first game at the BMO Harris Bradley Center on Friday against the Cleveland Cavaliers.  It’ll be the last opening night at the arena the team has called home since 1988.

In a feature in the October issue of Milwaukee Magazine, writer Zach Brooke explores the new arena that is rising downtown.

Penguin Random House

Writer David Barclay Moore worked for eight years for the New York-based anti-poverty nonprofit, Harlem Children’s Zone. His work involved shooting short-form videos that told stories about the people the group was seeking to help. This experience helped him to understand, first hand, the challenges faced by many of the people living in concentrated pockets of public housing.

A lot has happened in the last year and a half for singer-songwriter Tift Merritt.  A new baby, a new album, and a new creative outlet - textile design. 

Almost none of it has come simply or easily.

A federal judge in Maryland has blocked parts of President Trump's most recent attempt to impose broad limits on who can enter the U.S., granting a motion for a preliminary injunction that was filed by plaintiffs led by the International Refugee Assistance Project.

The plaintiffs "have established that they are likely to succeed on the merits," District Judge Theodore D. Chuang wrote in the Tuesday order dealing another setback to the Trump administration's attempt to ban travel to the U.S. by citizens of certain countries.

Emotions ran high, as abortion rights took center stage at the State Capitol on Tuesday. A Senate committee held a public hearing on a Republican bill that would forbid UW employees from working part-time at Planned Parenthood’s Madison clinic. The measure targets an agreement that’s been in place for nearly a decade.

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Tues., October 24

6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

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