Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

Dolly's Dollies

Jan 13, 2017

If you hear, "her life is plastic and it's fantastic!" and immediately think "Barbie," you'll love this game. We took the Dolly Parton song "9-to-5" and rewrote it to be about careers that have been held by an official Barbie doll.

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D-lightful

Jan 13, 2017

All answers in this final round consist of two words, both words starting with D. For example, if we said, "A clue in Jeopardy! where a contestant can wager their entire earnings," you'd answer, "Daily Double."

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Cat Cora: Her Kitchen Rules

Jan 13, 2017

According to celebrity chef Cat Cora, when she became the first female Iron Chef in America, things started to get a little weird. "I got into a winning streak...I would wear the same socks, I'd eat the same breakfast - I mean five almonds on my granola, my two tablespoons ... of yogurt... I measured everything out," she told host Ophira Eisenberg. "You get weird, you get freakin' weird."

Bring Your "Ay" Game

Jan 13, 2017

An-cay ou-yay eak-spay ig-Pay atin-Lay? In this game, clues hint at a word AND its Pig Latin translation. If we said, "Get CLOSE TO THE GROUND to CHEER at a bullfight," you'd answer, "Low... ole," because the Pig Latin translation of the word "LOW" is "OW-LAY."

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Mystery Guest

Jan 13, 2017

This week's Mystery Guest, Matthew Ahn, used to hold a Guinness World Record, but as of 2017, that record has officially been nullified. Now it's up to Ophira and Jonathan to ask "yes" or "no" questions and figure out what his world record was!

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This, That Or The Other

Jan 13, 2017

In this week's installment of This, That, or the Other, contestants decide if the answer is a brand of whiskey, a U.S. Navy ship, or the name of a dog who won "Best in Show" at Westminster.

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Writer Gregor Hens doesn't smoke anymore, but he used to — a lot. And as he explains in his memoir, Nicotine, he still thinks about it every day.

He writes, "Every form of cigarette ad gives me a pang of longing, every scrunched-up, carelessly thrown away cigarette packet at a bus stop, every trod-on cigarette butt, every beautiful woman holding a cigarette between her fingers or just looking like she could be holding one."

How much criticism can a single half-hour episode of television sustain before it gets the ax?

On Friday, we may have gotten our answer: An episode of the British comedy series Urban Myths — which drew widespread complaints for featuring the white actor Joseph Fiennes as Michael Jackson — has been canceled by Sky TV before it could air.

We are happy to be joined this week by Gimlet's Brittany Luse, the host of For Colored Nerds and the future host of shows not yet invented! Brittany joins us to talk first about Hidden Figures, the high-performing historical drama about black women working in the space program. We talk about the marvelous cast (including Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, and Janelle Monae), the ways in which such projects inevitably compromise truth with theater, and whether Kevin Costner is all that nice of a guy or all that important to the story.

If you are interested in food stories accompanied by overhead videos showcasing recipes involving just three ingredients, you would be better off reading something else. This is because when preparing dishes to accompany the new Netflix adaptation of A Series of Unfortunate Events, which premieres Jan. 13, the more complex the recipe, the more you'll identify with the many trials and tribulations of the orphaned Baudelaire children as they try to unravel the mysteries surrounding them.

Copyright 2017 WBHM-FM. To see more, visit WBHM-FM.

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The six faith leaders President-elect Donald Trump has invited to pray at his inauguration come from diverse backgrounds, but they have something in common: All have personal ties to Trump or his family or have in some way signaled their approval of him, his politics or his wealth.

A downtown section of Birmingham, Ala., including the church where four black girls were killed in a Ku Klux Klan bombing in 1963, has been declared a national monument by President Obama.

The 16th Street Baptist Church will be the focal point of the Birmingham Civil Rights National Historical Park. The bombing, which also injured 22 other people, proved to be a turning point in the civil rights struggle.

It's a tough job, but somebody has to do it. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Mike Sutter, food critic for the San Antonio Express-News, about his "365 days of Tacos" series, in which he eats at a different taco joint every day for a year. He's done it before, in Austin, where he ate more than 1,600 tacos in 2015. But now he's moved to San Antonio, and he's finding that the taco scene there is a bit different, and in fact is tied to a cultural identity that spans back many decades.

When Otto and Anna Quangel, a middle-aged couple in early '40s Berlin, receive a letter informing them their only son has died in the Battle of France, they take the news with curious resignation. Otto can't even bring himself to open the envelope, leaving his wife alone to process its contents. Their reaction is somewhere between shock and a grim acceptance of the inevitable, and it stands in sharp contrast to a city buoyed by Nazi victories and nationalist propaganda. They've lost their child and they've lost their country, perhaps long before.

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