Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Paul Ingles / Flickr

The Hops Museum in Madison just held its grand opening in May with its first exhibit on the Hess Family Cooperage and its contribution to Beer Making in Madison.

The exhibit is based on a book entitled Roll out the Barrels, written by Gary Hess, the grandson of the company’s founding father. The exhibition currently consists of photographs, acting as a storyboard for the interactive exhibit yet to come.

The next time you dab wasabi on your sushi or spread mustard on your hot dog, take a moment to thank a caterpillar. It may sound unlikely, but the critters play a critical role in creating the sharp, pungent flavors that give those condiments a savory kick.

Ah, the bread basket. You sit down for a nice meal out, and there it appears: piping hot, giving off a waft of yeasty divinity.

Who can resist?

There's a reason this age-old tradition prevails. Even in the era of paleo and gluten-free, there are still hordes of us who will gladly nosh on crusty, chewy, soul-warming bread.

But the downside may be more than just some extra calories. Turns out, eating all those carbs before a meal can amp up our appetites and spike our blood sugar.

During our recent time with charming Bostonian librarian Margaret Willison, we managed to sit her down for a chat about audiobooks. We discovered that while I am a frequent listener to a variety of kinds of books (as I wrote about recently), Margaret uses them in a very different way that might appeal to some of you who like to revisit and reread your favorites.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Updated at 7:45 p.m. ET

Investigators continue their examination of a fire at the Glover Grove Baptist Church of Warrenville, S.C.

Fires damaged Glover Grove and some other black churches in the days following nine shooting deaths at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, raising concerns that the incidents were hate-inspired arsons.

Now, in the case of Glover Grove, the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division has released the following statement, saying it still doesn't know how the blaze started.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Mennonite church encompasses an incredibly diverse group of people, including a small minority that still use a horse and buggy to get around. The largest organization in the faith — Mennonite Church USA — has nearly 100,000 members. Still, whatever the variety of its members, the church is known foremost for two things: pacifism and justice work.

Lately, though, the Mennonite church has been facing a split over how to interpret that ideal of justice — and how it applies to the question of gay and lesbian membership and marriage.

Two years ago, a wildfire was raging in the foothills of North Arizona. The Granite Mountain Hotshots, a team of elite firefighters from Prescott, Ariz., were on the ground, battling the blaze.

Then the weather and the winds shifted, and the two-day-old Yarnell Hill Fire changed course. The commander had a huge decision to make: stay on safe ground, or try to cut off the blaze?

He made the call — and before the day was over, 19 hotshot firefighters were dead. It was one of the deadliest incidents for wildland firefighters in U.S. history.

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