Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For some comics fans, Alan Moore is basically a god.

He's the media-shy and magnificently bearded writer of comics like Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell — though if you've only ever seen the movies, please, I implore you: Read the books.

Recently, Moore said he's stepping back from comics to focus on other projects — like his epic new novel, Jerusalem. It's full of angels, devils, saints and sinners and visionaries, ghost children and wandering writers, all circling his home town of Northampton, England.

Talking about God is pretty standard for American politicians. But a line that has been popping up often in Donald Trump's recent campaign speeches seems to go further.

At a recent gathering of conservative Christians in Washington, D.C., Trump promised that if he is elected president, "we will be one American nation." The Republican nominee quoted the Bible and spelled out his vision for American unity:

You want to win the Emmy pool tonight.

Doesn't matter why: Maybe you want the money, maybe you just want to rub your victory in your friend Trish's face, because she reads Variety and calls TV shows "skeins."

God, Trish, right? Trish is the worst.

Election year or not, nothing says fall like football and basketball — and while politics may dominate the public consciousness, there are a lot of people flipping the channel to sports for a respite from that kind of action.

African-American women have been wearing fancy hats to church for generations. That tradition is being celebrated at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, which officially opens in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 24. Vintage turbans, caps and fascinators that span a half-century are on display — all from the shop of one woman.

Her name is Mae Reeves.

http://juniperbook.com/

On Juniper's conception

I was in my early 30s, and nobody suspected that I would have any problem. There was no reason to think that, but it took us four and a half years to conceive, and it took just about everything we had. It took all our money, all our time, all our patience and an egg donor.

On her pregnancy

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Donald Glover's new TV show Atlanta has been described as having "dreamy and weird" moments, of mixing "hyper-realism ... with brief moments of surrealism ...

Chris Thile asked his parents for a mandolin when he was 2 years old. In the decades since, Thile has fronted the bands Nickel Creek and Punch Brothers and, while he was at it, won a MacArthur "genius" grant and sold millions of records. Next month, he will take over as the new host of A Prairie Home Companion.

We've invited Thile, frontman for Nickel Creek, to answer three questions about Nickelback, the Canadian band that some have called the worst rock 'n' roll band of all time.

William Patrick Kinsella, the Canadian author whose award-winning book Shoeless Joe was adapted into the beloved film Field of Dreams, had died at the age of 81.

His literary agent Carolyn Swayze issued a statement Friday confirming his death, calling him "a unique, creative and outrageously opinionated man."

And as NPR's Rose Friedman tells our Newscast unit, the most famous line he ever wrote was whispered – "If you build it, he will come," in 1982's Shoeless Joe.

Ex Fabula: Influences

Sep 17, 2016
Brian Jacobson

This weekend Milwaukee opens its doors for a unique peek inside some of the city’s most historic and unique architecture, while enjoying educational tours and entertainment events. Ex Fabula will be joining the Doors Open Milwaukee line-up with a non-competitive, curated StorySlam all about Milwaukee.

No chemical used by farmers, it seems, gets more attention than glyphosate, also known by its trade name, Roundup. That's mainly because it is a cornerstone of the shift to genetically modified crops, many of which have been modified to tolerate glyphosate. This, in turn, persuaded farmers to rely on this chemical for easy control of their weeds. (Easy, at least, until weeds evolved to become immune to glyphosate, but that's a different story.)

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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