Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

A YouTuber named James Wright Chanel has been all over the Internet praising Patti LaBelle's sweet potato pies; a video he uploaded of himself bursting into song upon tasting the singer and cookbook author's name-brand concoction has been viewed over 2 million times.

Days after announcing that America's Test Kitchen co-founder Chris Kimball had left the company over a contract dispute, the enterprise's parent company says Kimball will continue to host America's Test Kitchen Radio, which is also a podcast.

Seven Facts You Didn't Know About the Gettysburg Address

Nov 19, 2015
Library of Congress

Over one-hundred fifty years ago today, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the "Gettysburg Address."

At a scant 272 words, it has become Lincoln’s most famous speech and is one of American history’s best known as well.

But there’s a lot that isn’t commonly known about the context in which it was delivered, and our Civil War contributor Thomas Martin Sobottke offers these little-known facts.

1. Lincoln wasn't the keynote speaker.

Pay the Devil, Facebook

Even the members of the Milwaukee band Pay the Devil have trouble precisely describing the type of music they play. They group liberally mixes bluegrass, old-time country, sea shanties, Irish traditional, and folk, with a big dose of attitude.

The group has been playing together since 2011, and will perform Saturday night at G-Daddy’s BBC Bar and Grill on the East Side in support of their new album, called Wrong Side of the River.

Editor's note: A version of this story originally ran in November 2014.

The countdown to Thanksgiving has begun. And for those of us who already feel short on time during a regular week, the pressure is on to figure out just how to squeeze in all that extra shopping, prep work and cooking ahead of the holiday.

Sooty 'Lungdon' Is A Breathlessly Exciting Finale

Nov 19, 2015

I have read the conclusion to Edward Carey's Iremonger trilogy and am left a bit breathless, which on the whole is a good thing, as this is a sooty, choking, lung-blackening sort of book, and reading it with held breath is probably safest.

As many leading conservatives call for stopping Syrian refugees from entering the United States, several evangelical Christian organizations are pushing back.

Since last week's attacks in Paris, at least 30 governors in this country, mostly Republicans, have called for keeping Syrian refugees out of the U.S.

In 1950, Isaac Asimov revolutionized how we think about robotics with his short story collection I, Robot. The world has changed a lot since then, a fact Curtis White points out — and points out, and points out — in his book We, Robots. Subtitled Staying Human in the Age of Big Data, White's book is something of a sequel to his last one, 2013's The Science Delusion, in which he stirred up controversy by using both philosophy and satire to help puncture what he sees as today's overreliance on rigid, systematic thinking and social organization.

It was a glitzy night of bow ties and bon mots in New York City. But the real attractions at the 66th annual National Book Awards were the winners themselves: Adam Johnson, in fiction; Ta-Nehisi Coates, in nonfiction; Robin Coste Lewis, in poetry; and Neal Shusterman, in young people's literature.

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