Economy & Business

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We asked what was stressing you out about the economy. You had a lot to say.

Apr 28, 2017
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Lizzie O'Leary and Hayley Hershman

This week, our Marketplace-Edison Anxiety Poll found that 18- to 24-year-olds were feeling pretty stressed about the economy. So we asked you to tell us about what was giving you anxiety.

People had a lot to say on the matter. Listeners called, emailed, wrote to us on Facebook and tweeted.

 

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Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace has been working on a new series since inauguration day called "The Big Promise." Based out of Erie, Pennsylvania, it's a look at how President Trump's policies and the promises he made are playing in a town where the economy is changing.

We were in Erie yesterday and took a swing by a bait shop called Presque Isle Angler Bait and Tackle. It's the kind of place where you can get your supplies: a couple of worms, some tackle and a cup of coffee, too.

04/28/2017: What a week

Apr 28, 2017
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Marketplace

Just ahead of his 100-day mark, President Trump had one of the bigger economic weeks of his young administration. This week had it all: Tax policy! Trade policy! A narrowly avoided government shutdown tied to the budget and health care! Plus, capping it all off, a lackluster GDP report. We'll try and figure out what it all means in the Weekly Wrap. Plus: Trump just signed an executive order allowing more drilling in the Atlantic and Arctic oceans with the premise it will create jobs. But with crude at $50, is that really going to happen?

President Obama signed offshore drilling bans for Arctic and Atlantic areas just before he left office, but President Trump's new executive order could cancel that.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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Jana Kasperkevic

Turns out, the "Fearless Girl" statue is not just a feminist symbol, it’s also generated millions in free advertising for the financial firm that commissioned it.

Apex Marketing crunched the numbers and found that since State Street Global Advisors installed the statue in early March, it has been worth $7.4 million in advertising, according to Bloomberg. All the tweets, selfies and news reports mentioning the artwork resulted in:

First-quarter economic growth numbers are out this morning, indicating that GDP underwent the slowest pace of growth in three years. We'll explore what the data points reveal about consumer and business activity. Next, we'll look at the local South LA economy 25 years after the infamous LA riots, which followed the acquittal of several white police officers who were caught on video beating the unarmed black motorist Rodney King. Today, some residents are enjoying a housing boom, but for many, economic conditions haven't improved since 1992.

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Tony Wagner

We started kicking the tires on a Make Me Smart book group a couple weeks ago, and today we're making it official.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The GDP first estimate for the first quarter is out Friday. President Trump has promised growth of 4 or even 5 percent; his treasury secretary just promised major economic growth in defense of the president’s supply-side tax proposal. But what, realistically, is the first quarter GDP likely to show? Economists are puzzling over a contradiction between what they call “hard” and “soft” data. Reports on consumer and business spending, industrial output — the “hard data — have been pretty mediocre so far this year.

In 1949, Thomas Forkner Sr. was in the real estate business when he helped Joe Rogers Sr. buy a house.

Rogers was working for the Toddle House restaurant chain and he convinced Forkner to join him in starting their own restaurant.

The two opened the first 24-hour Waffle House on Labor Day in 1955 in the Atlanta suburb of Avondale Estates.

By the time they sold the business in the late 1970s, the chain had grown to 400 restaurants.

The Atlanta-based company that owns the chain now has more than 1,500 locations.

The former Mormon who created a hacktivist website

Apr 28, 2017
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Bruce Johnson and Danielle Stephens

On Marketplace Tech, we’re taking a deeper look at "hacktivism," activist hackers who use their digital toolkit to push a social agenda. But in their mission to make information more transparent or accessible to all, some hacktivists take a lot of personal risks when they go up against the status quo.

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Bruce Johnson

In our series on "hacktivism," we take a deeper look at how hackers use their digital toolkit to push for a particular agenda. We looked at the debate over Sci Hub, a site that allowed scientific research papers, previously behind a paywall, to be shared with everyone. We heard from John Bohannon, a contributing correspondent for Science Magazine. Below is an edited transcript of his conversation with Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson.

How hacktivism intersects with the law

Apr 28, 2017
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Bruce Johnson and Danielle Stephens

We’re taking a deeper look at the idea of hacktivism, and how activists use technology to push forward a social or political agenda.

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Marketplace

It's been a busy past few days in the tech world, so we're going to kick off the show by playing "Silicon Tally" — the game where were try to stump people with numbers from the week's tech news. Our guest this Friday: Melissa Kirsch, editor in chief of Lifehacker. Afterwards, we'll look at virtual reality's strong presence at the annual Tribeca Film Festival, and then chat with researcher Molly Sauter about the laws governing cyber crime.

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Andy Uhler

For more than a year, Marketplace has been working with Edison Research to measure how people feel about the economy. The latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll is out this week. Respondents were given the choice between two statements: “Immigrants take jobs away from American workers” or “Immigrants do the jobs Americans don’t want to do.” Sixty percent of Americans chose the latter.

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