Economy & Business

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Tech IRL: Apps for relationships and to mend a broken heart

Feb 12, 2016
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Lizzie O'Leary and Bruce Johnson

Looking for a date or trying to avoid an ex? There's an app for that. Trying to foster and maintain an already serious relationship? Yeah, there's an app for that too.

Lizzie talks with Marketplace Tech's Ben Johnson about how your smartphone can help you navigate love. Plus, Northwestern University Professor and clinical psychologist Alexandra Solomon, Professor at Northwestern University tells us about how tech has impacted relationships positively and negatively.

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Marketplace Weekend Staff

President's Day Weekend is prime-time for sales. Maybe you've been waiting till now to buy that new mattress — and maybe you'll end up with a few things you didn't plan on.

We want to know about your most memorable impulse buys.

You know, those things that — in the light of day — you can't believe you bought on a whim.

Call and leave a message at (800) 648-5114, tell us on Facebook or reach us on Twitter, we're @MarketplaceWKND.

Paul Reiser takes the Marketplace Quiz

Feb 12, 2016
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Raghu Manavalan

No matter who you are, you probably had a job that changed you, or you learned a financial lesson that stuck with you. Each week, we ask actors, writers, comedians and musicians to open up and tell us about how money played a role in their life. This week, actor Paul Reiser stepped into our New York bureau to fill out our questionnaire based on his experiences with money.

Fill in the blank, money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you ____:

Marketplace for Friday, February 12, 2016

Feb 12, 2016

How low oil prices can hurt Saudi Arabia's economy in the long run; what Downton Abbey's latest season has in common with today's health care system; and a look back on business and economics with the Weekly Wrap.

Is Pandora being boxed in by a flawed business model?

Feb 12, 2016
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Adrienne Hill

Plenty of stocks have taken a pounding this year then bounced back. And then been pounded again.  

But for Pandora, the internet radio giant, it's been a whole lot of  pounding, and precious little bounce back.

Shares finished the day down 12 percent.  Yesterday the company reported a $169 million dollar net loss for 2015. And now there's news that after blazing the trail for music-streaming services, Pandora may be on the block. 

Marketplace Weekend for Friday, February 12, 2016

Feb 12, 2016
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Lizzie O'Leary and Bruce Johnson

This weekend, just in time for Valentine's Day, Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O'Leary and Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson look into the apps designed for people in relationships, a pregnant woman tells us what it's like living in Brazil during the Zika outbreak, and actor and comedian Paul Reiser takes the Marketplace Quiz. 

Weekly Wrap: Janet Yellen and market volatility

Feb 12, 2016

Joining us to talk about the week's business and economic news are David Gura from Bloomberg and Nela Richardson at Redfin. The big topics this week: Janet Yellen's testimony and market volatility. 

The appeal of post-recession films

Feb 12, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

It seems we've officially made the transition from documentaries about the 2008 financial crisis to feature films about the crisis.

From movies like "The Big Short" to "The Wolf of Wall Street," filmmakers, critics and audiences alike seem to be captivated by the mess left in the wake of the recent recession. But getting to this point took time, according to The New York Times writer Alessandra Stanley.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Bernie Sanders sees it, Wall Street got a big boost when U.S. taxpayers bailed out some of the largest financial institutions in 2008. Now it's time for Wall Street to return the favor.

Sanders has proposed something he calls a speculation tax, a small levy on every stock, bond or derivative sold in the United States.

The revenue would go toward free tuition at public colleges and universities and would also be used to pare down student debt and pay for work-study programs, as well as other programs, Sanders says.

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