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10/20/2017: Tech innovation in Ciudad Juarez

Oct 20, 2017

(Markets Edition) The GOP is getting closer to tax reform following the Senate's approval of a budget resolution, which could mean $1.5 trillion in tax cuts. Chris Low from FTN Financial joined us to talk about how interest rates will play a role in making up that lost revenue, a crucial point going forward given that Trump has to select the next Fed chair soon. Afterwards, we'll discuss Japan's upcoming snap election, in which the current prime minister, Shinzo Abe, is expected to retain power.

A tourism destination relies on its image as a place where people want to spend their free time and their money. That can be a tough sell after the world has been inundated with pictures of disaster.

In the Florida Keys, the tourism industry is trying to rev up — especially in time to catch Fantasy Fest in late October, the biggest event of the year in the island chain. But many who live and work in the Keys are still digging out from Hurricane Irma.

With North Korea looming, Japan heads to the polls

Oct 20, 2017

Japan is holding a snap election on Sunday. Prime Minister Shinzō Abe is widely expected to retain power, with his party maybe losing a few seats from its huge majority. In many ways, the election is a referendum on the prime minister’s economic reforms, known as Abenomics. It’s also a vote about national security.

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Pressure from Amazon has Walmart.com looking for new kinds of customers. According to the Wall Street Journal, the giant discount store is close to landing a deal with Lord & Taylor, one of the oldest luxury department stores in the country. 

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10/20/2017: Congress moves closer to tax reform

Oct 20, 2017

(U.S. Edition) The Senate has approved a $4 trillion budget, checking one of the boxes the GOP needs before it pushes a tax overhaul. We'll look at how this will help Republicans' tax efforts, and whether the budget provides anymore clues about the party's plans for tax reform. Afterwards, we'll discuss Walmart's courtship of Lord & Taylor, one of the country's oldest department stores, and then report on the emerging demand for "greener" aluminum. 

Looking for tech innovators in Mexico's Ciudad Juarez

Oct 20, 2017

Maquilas, the factories along the U.S. and Mexico border that turn out truckloads of U.S. consumer products and auto parts are notorious for long, monotonous shifts and some of the lowest wages in Mexico. Automation is expected to eliminate as much as 52 percent of these assembly jobs over the next decade. Before that happens, business incubator Technology Hub, in the city of Ciudad Juarez, is working to develop higher paying tech employment, with a push to transform Ciudad Juarez into an innovation-based economy.

The emerging demand for "greener" aluminum

Oct 20, 2017

Sales of aluminum are on the rise, and that’s in part because using it in products can have environmental benefits. But there’s a dirtier side to aluminum — producing it is energy intensive. So, now demand is growing for “greener” aluminum.

Senate GOP backs budget, clears way for tax overhaul

Oct 20, 2017

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans must now shift their focus to enacting President Donald Trump’s sweeping tax plan, a far heavier lift than the $4 trillion budget plan they’ve muscled through the Senate to lay the groundwork for the first tax overhaul in three decades.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... German Chancellor Angela Merkel might have thrown British Prime Minister Theresa May a Brexit lifeline overnight, but will it be enough to reignite dialogue between the UK and the EU on their looming divorce? Afterwards, we’ll explain why football, kangaroos and meat pies might still be going strong in Australia, but not GM Holden cars, which have hit the brakes on domestic production.

Congress's push to get self-driving cars on the road faster

Oct 20, 2017

Right now, states and cities decide if and how they want autonomous vehicles on their streets. But the U.S. Senate is considering a measure that would standardize the rules of the road and let automakers sell more vehicles with self-driving capabilities over the next three years. The House of Representatives has already passed a different version of the bill.

10/20/2017: Self-driving regulation speeds along

Oct 20, 2017

Right now, states and cities decide if and how they want autonomous vehicles on their streets. The U.S. Senate is considering a measure that would standardize the rules of the road and let automakers sell more cars with self-driving capabilities over the next three years. It's passed out of committee and will go to a full Senate vote in the coming weeks. The House of Representatives has already passed a different version of the bill. Republican Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, one of the sponsors of the bill, talks with Molly Wood about the legislation.

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10/19/2017: Tax reform's brain drain

Oct 19, 2017

Kai Ryssdal promised we weren't going to talk about tax reform today, but it kept coming up: Rep. Pat Tiberi's resignation from Congress signals a brain drain of tax code experts in the Ways and Means Committee, which could make tax reform a lot messier. And we checked in with a union leader in Erie, Pennsylvania, who wasn't exactly moved by President Donald Trump's big announcement that tax reform would lead to the rebirth of American industry.

Another toddler has reportedly been crushed to death by an unsecured Ikea dresser, after the furniture giant recalled millions of chests and dressers over the risk of deadly tip-over accidents.

Jozef Dudek, 2, died in May, according to lawyers for his family, when he was crushed by an Ikea Malm dresser in his parents' room after he was put down for a nap.

For more than a week, Marisol Paniagua has been living at an evacuation center. She had been scheduled to pick grapes at a vineyard near the city of Santa Rosa, Calif. But that work was canceled because of the wildfires ravaging Northern California.

"It's very difficult right now because we just have a little bit of gas left in our car. That's how we are still able to drive around," said Paniagua, 37. "But the fact is, we have nothing."

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