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Stories Of Hope Amid America's 'Unwinding'

May 19, 2013

According to New Yorker writer George Packer, there used to be a kind of deal among Americans — a deal in which everyone had a place.

"People were more constrained than they are today, they had less freedom," he says, "but they had more security and there was a sense in which each generation felt that the next generation would be able to improve itself, to do better."

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Tesla Motors, the American maker of luxury electric cars, has been riding a wave of good publicity.

Its Model S sedan (base priced at $62,400, after federal tax credits) was just named Motor Trend Car of the Year. Reviewers at Consumer Reports gave the lithium-ion battery powered vehicle a rave.

And the company, headed by billionaire innovator Elon Musk, 41, posted a profit for the first time in its 10-year history — powered in part by zero-emission environmental credits.

Summer is almost here, and with it comes the army of interns marching into countless American workplaces. Yet what was once an opportunity for the inexperienced is becoming a front-line labor issue.

More and more, unpaid and low-paid interns are feeling their labor is being exploited. Some are even willing to push back — with lawsuits.

For years, reports have suggested that Afghanistan is sitting on massive deposits of copper, gold, iron and rare earth minerals valued up to $3 trillion. This provides hope for a future economy that would not have to rely so heavily on foreign donations.

But with an uncertain political, regulatory and security environment, international investors are hesitant. And it could be many years before Afghanistan begins extracting its mineral wealth.

Flax is the oily seed usually spotted in the nutritional supplement or cereal aisles. It's marketed as a superfood because of its high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and fiber.

Omega-3s may do all kinds of good things for humans — like protect against Alzheimer's, heart disease and even cancer — so it seems reasonable to think they could also protect the health of animals.

How Best To Encourage Black 'Teenpreneurs'

May 17, 2013

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This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. I'm Celeste Headlee. Coming up, it's National Bike to Work Day, but many millennials prefer two wheels to four. Why more 20-somethings are driving less. That's just ahead.

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Desktop Diaries: Daniel Kahneman

May 17, 2013

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Flora Lichtman is here with our video pick. Flora, you have the next installment in our Desktop Diaries series in which you get to know scientists by asking them about their desk trinkets.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: That's right.

FLATOW: And who do we have today?

Giving It Away

May 17, 2013

Do We Have The Wrong Idea About Charity?

May 17, 2013

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Dan Pallotta's TEDTalk

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Renee Montagne is in Afghanistan. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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NPR's business news starts with trouble at Dell.

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President Obama has named a new acting commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service. His name is Daniel Werfel. He replaces Steven Miller, who resigned from that post amid revelations that the IRS inappropriately targeted conservative groups.

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