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85: Expl4inathon

Oct 9, 2018

It's time for another Explainathon, the biannual tradition when we put Kai and Molly to the test: In 30 minutes, they'll try to answer as many of your questions as possible. It's going to be tough, because this might just be our widest-ranging 'thon yet: Gamers! Trade wars! Gas prices! Bots on the trading floor! Plus, Kai and Molly will try to stump each other.

Courtesy of Super Pear Strategies, LLC.

There was a time when the corporate break room was a hodgepodge of vending machines selling bitter coffee, stale sandwiches, and those cheese and cracker sandwiches in Day-Glo orange.

Those kinds of break rooms are largely gone from the scene, replaced in some larger companies by catered kitchens that offer a variety of entrees and snacks. But a Menomonee Falls company called Davians is providing a service for companies that aren’t quite large enough to warrant an on-site restaurant but want to offer fresher options than a vending machine. 

Coin-operated gumball machines aren't as common as they used to be. With sales slowly dwindling over the years and high domestic sugar prices, America's sole remaining gumball maker has been branching out to stay afloat.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Markets Edition) New numbers show the benefits of aggressively helping young people finish school and find jobs. A study followed two groups, both ages 16 to 24, on their journeys. Then we dive into the markets, where the latter half of this week signals the beginning of a new season of sorts for market participants. Also, we check in on the last American gumball company standing, Ford Gum and Machine Company, which has been around for more than a century.

A Wall Street Journal report finds that the private information of nearly half a million Google users was vulnerable from 2015 to March 2018.

Ask a Manager: Should we talk politics at work?

Oct 9, 2018

Watercooler chit chat isn’t always captivating: Martha’s got a new cat, traffic really was terrible today and Garrett wants to explain the difference between bouldering and top roping, again. But conversations at the watercooler don’t always stay cool. Talking politics at work can heat things up very fast. With the midterms less than a month out, it might seem impossible to avoid.

(U.S. Edition) A new report details how the private information of almost half a million Google users was exposed to hackers until Google sealed up the leak in the spring. The apparent weak link was Google Plus, so we take a look at the data vulnerabilities that can occur when a platform fades into oblivion. Then, we check the global economic pulse with new data from the International Monetary Fund.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The IMF has downgraded its view of global growth due in part to ongoing trade tensions. We’ll hear from the organization’s chief economist. Then, after a month of speculation, Pakistan put rumors to rest and said it will seek a bailout from the International Monetary Fund to tackle its mounting balance of payments crisis. We’ll hear from our reporter on the ground in Islamabad.  Afterwards, Korean pop band BTS has stepped in to fill the boy-band vacuum, igniting a wave of excitement around the globe with its “Love Yourself” world tour.

A report last week from Bloomberg Businessweek suggested that Chinese spies had embedded tiny microchips on motherboards that control computers in order to steal information from nearly 30 U.S. companies, including Apple and Amazon. Both of those companies, and Super Micro, the electronics maker that was allegedly infiltrated, and the Chinese government have categorically denied the report. But the story is lingering, in part because it brings up a very scary reality that lots of cybersecurity experts keep talking about. Molly Wood talks about it with cybersecurity expert Bruce Schneier.

A report last week from Bloomberg Businessweek suggested that Chinese spies had embedded tiny little microchips on motherboards that control computers in order to steal information from nearly 30 U.S. companies, including Apple and Amazon. Both of those companies, and Super Micro Computer Inc., the electronics maker that was allegedly infiltrated have categorically denied the report.

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Swearing in, Justice Brett Kavanaugh said that he will put the polarizing fight over his nomination behind him.

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For decades, whenever stevedore Giorgos Nouchoutidis arrived for work at the port of Piraeus, he would breathe in the fresh, briny sea breeze and feel a surge of pride.

Fourteen-year-old Caydden Zimmerman's school days start early and end late.

He has a 90-minute bus ride to get from the homeless shelter where he is staying in Boise, Idaho, to his middle school. He wakes up at 5:45 a.m., quickly brushes his teeth and smooths some gel in his hair, and then he dashes downstairs to catch his school bus.

The fields and back roads of eastern Arkansas were a crime scene this past summer. State inspectors stopped alongside fields to pick up dying weeds. They tested the liquids in farmers' pesticide sprayers. In many cases, they found evidence that farmers were using a banned pesticide. Dozens of farmers could face thousands of dollars in fines.

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