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(U.S. Edition) U.S. authorities are reportedly looking at connections some U.S. individuals may have to South Africa's Gupta family, which is currently embroiled in a series of scandals. We'll look at the family's background and their political influence. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new report that says the aging experience will be different for younger generations. One of these changes: growing inequality. Afterwards, we'll look back at a major event in our financial history, which happened 30 years ago today. On Black Monday, the stock market experienced the largest single-day ever. 

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... China's economic growth data came in better than expected today, just as the ruling Communist Party's once-every-five-years conference gets underway. But can the numbers be trusted? Afterwards — it's the 30th anniversary of Black Monday, the single-biggest daily decline in U.S. stock markets. The panic then rippled across the world, leading to double digit declines in places from Australia to Spain to Hong Kong. With global markets hitting fresh highs, have we learned any lessons from the intervening three decades?

Amazon has inked deals with several of the nation’s largest apartment building owners to install Amazon locker systems at residential properties, where packages can be delivered and stored for pickup.

Those contracts could give Amazon a more convenient way to deliver packages to customers in more than 850,000 apartment units across the U.S., the Wall Street Journal reports

Thirty years ago this week, the Dow Jones suffered its biggest one day percentage loss ever — almost 23 percent of its value in just six and a half hours.

On Black Monday, Kenneth Polcari, now a managing director at O’Neil Securities, was a rookie trader on the New York Stock Exchange. The market “just went down, and down. It just never came up for air,” said Polcari, “Johnson & Johnson lost nearly 50 percent of its value in six and half hours.”

Your pension fund could be invested in tech

Oct 19, 2017

The economics of the tech industry is a chain with a bunch of confusing links. Startups get their money from venture capital firms, and we've talked about how that works and why it heavily influences who becomes key players in tech and what products end up in your hands. But how do venture capital firms get their money? Limited partners, or private corporations; state, county and city entities; and universities. Now, continue to follow me down the chain.

10/19/2017: How venture capital gets its funding

Oct 19, 2017

The tech industry’s economy hinges on venture capital. But what does venture capital’s economy hinge on? Private corporations, city entities and universities. These groups, called limited partners, fund firms with endowment money and pension funds, or part of your paycheck. On this episode of Marketplace Tech, we look into the world of limited partners.

Copyright 2017 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

If there's one thing President Trump's critics want from him, and he refuses to give up, it's his tax returns.

The returns didn't come up during Wednesday's hearing in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in Manhattan. But the hearing was the first step in a process that could loosen Trump's grip on them.

If the next step goes the plaintiffs' way, the case could make the president's tax returns surface.

To sell his tax plan, President Donald Trump is trying a send message to ordinary Americans: that cutting corporate taxes will benefit you too. Speaking in Pennsylvania last week, Trump claimed that his current proposal — which calls for lowering corporate taxes from 35 percent to 20 percent and which allows companies to bring back overseas money at a low tax rate — will actually translate into a $4,000 pay raise for a typical American household.

This past spring, David Mifflin looked at his credit report online and saw that something wasn't right.

There were inquiries from Chase Bank about an application for a credit card that someone was trying to open in his name. Mifflin, who lives in San Antonio, says he called the bank and was told the identity thieves "had my Social Security number."

He set up fraud alerts with the three major credit reporting companies. But he says the fraudulent attempts to open credit cards continued "multiple times a week, multiple times a day."

Picture a 5-year-old's Social Security card. For identity thieves who get their hands on it, that number could be used to apply for credit cards, rent a home or get government benefits, among other uses, according to the Federal Trade Commission. And it could be years before parents discover their children's information has been misused.

Each summer, as college students prepare to leave campus, they get rid of their textbooks, selling them for cheap. And Bob Peterson and Kenny Jacobson are waiting to buy them, and resell them when school is back in session and demand is high. Their scheme sounds simple, and it is. They've noticed a difference in price, and they're turning it into a quick profit.

Updated on Oct. 20 at 4:04 p.m. ET

Throughout his presidential campaign and since, President Trump has made bold assertions about his charitable giving. But as the Washington Post has thoroughly documented, those boasts of philanthropy don't always stand up to scrutiny.

Getting more women into coding, one girl at a time

Oct 18, 2017

Reshma Saujani founded Girls Who Code after running for Congress ... and losing. During her campaign, she toured a number of computer science classrooms and was puzzled at how rare it was to find women taking those courses. So she launched Girls Who Code, a nonprofit that introduces middle school and high school-aged girls to coding through after school clubs and summer programs.

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