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There have been a lot of protests going on recently. And at these events, there's a fair amount of time spent sitting, standing, waiting. Ian Bogost, a game critic and professor at Georgia Tech, discusses how a new website called protestgames.org aims to have attendees translate some of that downtime into positive energy. Next, we'll look at Alphabet's decision to sue Uber and Otto for allegedly stealing its intellectual property. And to end today's show, we'll play this week's Silicon Tally with Laura Weidman Powers, the co-founder and CEO of the nonprofit Code 2040.

New Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding an Obama-era memo that directed the Justice Department to reduce the use of private prisons, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports

Sessions writes in the order that returning to the Bureau of Prisons' earlier approach would provide flexibility.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Amid deep strains in the U.S. relationship with Mexico, a country that's been a favorite target of President Trump, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Homeland Security chief John Kelly took part in talks in Mexico City on Thursday that were aimed at smoothing out tensions.

"That's going to be a tough trip," the president said Thursday morning at the White House. Some of the key issues between the two countries: immigration, border security, trade and U.S. aid to Mexico.

The headlines are everywhere today: Americans trust the news media more than they do President Trump.

A new poll from Quinnipiac University shows that 52 percent of registered voters said they trust the news media more than Trump to tell them "the truth about important issues." Only 37 percent say they choose Trump.

When winter freezes Lake of the Woods in northern Minnesota, the landscape becomes dotted with sturdy wooden or metal shacks and canvas shelters. Inside them, people are ice fishing.

The sport attracts people to the frigid winter lakes in Canada and the northern United States. Some take it seriously enough to partake in official competitions. But for most people, it is a way to enjoy time with family, friends and perhaps a bottle of schnapps, and ultimately a delicious fish dinner from the day's efforts.

Top U.S. gunmaker says sales will pick back up under Trump

Feb 23, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

Donald Trump’s presidency might have put a damper on gun manufacturer stocks, but Sturm Ruger CEO Michael Fifer believes that the slump in demand is only temporary. His reasoning? Gun ownership is becoming more socially acceptable.

Lined up at a row of computers, five Ohio State University students stare intently at their screens amid the clatter of keyboards and mouse clicks. They're keeping in shape — so to speak.

Blog: Court the Protest Economy

Feb 23, 2017
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Phoebe Unterman

We’re less than two months into 2017, and already we’ve seen one of the largest days of protests in U.S. history, multiple cities divesting from a major bank and an endless list of boycotts proposed by President Donald Trump’s supporters and opponents alike.

Political newcomers eye running for office

Feb 23, 2017
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Marielle Segarra

Malka Zeefe is 38, and until recently, she'd never considered running for political office.

But since the election, Zeefe, who's a corporate lawyer and lives in Alexandria, Virginia, has already sought out and been appointed to a city commission for children, youth and families. She's a registered Democrat, and now she's thinking about running for school board. 

"For me, the time of just sitting back is over," she said.

Republicans are inspired too.

McDonald's is slashing drink prices. Starting in April, you can get any size soda for a buck and drinks like smoothies and frappes for $2. It’s the latest in a number of promotions — from all-day breakfast to three sizes of Big Mac — to keep customers coming back in a time of increased competition.

Imagining the future of coal in Gillette, Wyoming

Feb 23, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Lizzie O'Leary

Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O'Leary is traveling to three different cities, roughly the same size, that all have very different economies. It's an ongoing, country-spanning series, and her latest dispatch comes from Gillette, Wyoming, where one of the dominant industries is coal. 

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with O’Leary about why coal is so important in Gillette, what the mayor there hopes coal can do for her city in the future and how companies are reimagining how they use coal. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Get ready for a huge deficit hike

Feb 23, 2017

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the Trump administration will have a proposed tax plan completed by August. Based on campaign promises, its broad outlines will include a substantial cut to corporate taxes and perhaps reductions in individual taxes. Whatever the details, the plan will almost certainly blow up the federal deficit, and that has big economic and political implications. 

With Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin reiterating the Trump administration’s plans to spur economic growth of 3 percent or higher, we take a look at what it would take to get there: increase productivity (hard to do); use fiscal stimulus (tax cuts, infrastructure spending); and reduce regulations on business around lending to try and get businesses to spend more on equipment and domestic plants. But if the economy heats up that much, will we have the workforce to keep up now that workers are aging and with an administration that aims to cut down on immigration?

What's in a name? A lot, according to a new study from researchers at Ryerson University and the University of Toronto, both in Canada.

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