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For four years, the United States and the European Union have imposed sanctions on Russia over its aggression in Ukraine. The measures restrict travel and target assets of key individuals linked to the Kremlin.

But Ukraine says there's one major confidant of Russian President Vladimir Putin whom the Europeans should consider sanctioning, but haven't — former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder.

04/18/2018: Senior living in style

Apr 18, 2018

(U.S. Edition) Tax Day has changed thanks to some frozen software. After its website crashed, the IRS decided to give people a one-day extension on filing their tax returns. On today's show, we'll give some context surrounding the issue, which may have to do with the agency's shrinking budget. Afterwards, we'll look at what the selection of Cuba's new president could mean for the country's future, and then we'll talk about how baby boomers are reshaping "senior living." Think sophisticated sensors and restaurant-style dining. 

04/18/2018: AMC preps for Saudi Arabia cinema debut

Apr 18, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service...Facebook lays out how it will comply with strict European privacy regulations, but what does it mean for the future of advertising? Then, after a reportedly secret US visit to North Korea, are tensions between the two nations actually thawing? Afterwards, Saudi Arabia’s first cinema in four decades opens today with a screening of Black Panther. We talk to AMC’s boss about what to expect on opening night…and he reassures us there will be popcorn.  

The U.S. Census has projected that people age 65 or older will outnumber children under 18 by the year 2035. For now, as the baby boomer generation is aging, it is also reshaping senior living — and some older seniors are already trying it out.

What rules exist around our faces, and how are they tracked?

Apr 18, 2018

This week, a federal judge said Facebook must face a class-action lawsuit over facial recognition and how it collects what's called biometric data, such as images of faces and fingerprints. Three users sued Facebook under an Illinois state law that says the company has to get written permission before it collects such data. So far, the only laws against gathering that data come from a handful of states. 

We’re all being photographed, a lot — by each other, and by cameras in public and private spaces.  As our images become more widespread, there’s also more facial recognition technology that’s used to identify us. This week, a federal judge said Facebook must face a lawsuit over its use of facial recognition. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks with Joseph Lorenzo Hall, chief technologist at the Center for Democracy and Technology about the value in this kind of technology, along with what kind of harm it can cause.

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Days after it was revealed that Fox News host Sean Hannity was a client of President Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, The Atlantic reports that the political commentator has employed at least two other lawyers with links to the president and who are also frequent guests on his show.

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Barbara Bush’s literacy legacy

Apr 17, 2018

Former first lady Barbara Bush died today at home in Houston, Texas, according to a statement from her family. She was 92. Over the weekend, the wife of former President George H.W. Bush elected to forgo additional treatment for several health problems.

After the arrest of two black men who sat in a Philadelphia Starbucks without buying a drink, Starbucks is going through a public relations tailspin — and the company can't seem to say mea culpa fast enough.

CEO Kevin Johnson announced today that Starbucks would close its 8,000 company-owned stores on May 29 so that the approximately 175,000 employees could attend a day of bias training. But will that be the end of the company's attempts to restore its image?

Everyone gets another day to file their taxes after IRS site outage

Apr 17, 2018

Americans who waited until the last day to pay their taxes online got an unwelcome surprise: The IRS website to make payments and access other key services went down earlier today.

Now, taxpayers will get a one-day extension, and the filing system is back online.

IMF bumps up U.S. growth projections for 2018

Apr 17, 2018

The International Monetary Fund raised its growth target for the American economy today to 2.9 percent. That’s very close to the three percent forecast the Trump administration promised.  In a conversation about President Donald Trump's tax cuts and the overall state of the economy on Fox News this morning,  Trump's top economic adviser Larry Kudlow said we are starting to see "an economic boom.”

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal called up Kathy Bostjancic, the chief U.S. financial markets economist at Oxford Economics to get some context on the economic growth projections.

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