Economy & Business

Business news

It's been a decade since the financial crisis drove up the unemployment rate in the U.S. and forced people in the prime of their careers to give up looking for work.

Even today, as employers add jobs at a furious pace, the workforce participation rate still hasn't recovered. And now researchers think they know one reason why: the opioid crisis.

The trading relationship between the U.S. and China has been tense lately, defined by escalating tariff threats and bellicose rhetoric on both sides. The problem with tariffs though, is that they they often come with unintended consequences.

But if the U.S. wants to address China's questionable trade practices and counteract the negative effects of free trade, what is the government to do?Economist Jared Bernstein walks us through some of the alternative options for dealing with trade challenges.

Are we in a trade war yet?

Jun 18, 2018

The phrase "trade war" is getting thrown around a lot by now, including by this show. You might be wondering: What's it mean, exactly? And how do we know when we're actually in one? We'll do our best to answer those questions on the show today. Plus, we'll bring you the latest on the bidding war for Fox, the new nominee to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and, of course, Beyoncé and Jay-Z. (06/18/2018)

Video game addiction is now considered a medical condition

Jun 18, 2018

The World Health Organization has released a new list of medical conditions that for the first time includes gaming disorder. 

The BBC's Anu Anand, host of the Global Edition of our Morning Report program, joined us to discuss how it's defined and what its label as a medical condition could mean for insurance coverage. The following answers have been edited for clarity. 

So what is gaming disorder?

A report out today from CreditCards.com finds that millennials are the worst tippers across all age groups, and that’s costing low-wage service workers a vital part of their income.

Take Jose Mendoza, whose wage is $5 an hour as a server at Pio Pio Latin Cuisine in Orlando. He said he makes about $20 an hour, though, on a good day, because of tips. 

But, he explains, "the younger people, they don’t tip so good."

Video game addiction is real

Jun 18, 2018

(Markets Edition) The World Health Organization has released a new list of official medical conditions, which includes "gaming disorder," where people obsessively play video and computer games. We'll take a look at what exactly the disorder entails and why insurance companies might be able to cover it now. Afterwards, we'll discuss the nationwide increase in suicides, and how funding to address the issue is lagging behind.

President Donald Trump has nominated a permanent director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the agency created after the financial crisis. The nominee, Kathy Kraninger, is a federal budget official. We take a look at why the White House chose her and how the bureau has changed since its inception.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong took ownership of the Los Angeles Times in style with a full-page note to his readers and his new employees on Sunday.

Soon-Shiong bought the newspaper from its former corporate owners, the Chicago-based Tronc newspaper company. NPR spoke to Soon-Shiong about his ambitions for the newspaper.

German police arrested the CEO of Audi, Rupert Stadler, on Monday in connection with the ongoing investigation into Volkswagen's diesel emissions scandal.

Munich prosecutors ordered a search of Stadler's home last week, and officials told the BBC that "they had acted because of a risk that Mr Stadler might seek to suppress evidence."

Maybe the U.S. and global economies keep ticking along until the end of time and the markets remain forever chill. But that's not what history tells us. It's also not the view of the biggest hedge fund in the world: Bridgewater Associates.

In recent weeks, it's been circulating a warning. Bridgewater co-chief investment officer Greg Jensen and two of his colleagues say that, "We are bearish on almost all financial assets while markets are still pricing in Goldilocks conditions" and that "2019 is setting up to be a dangerous period for the economy." 

(U.S. Edition) President Trump has nominated a permanent director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Kathy Kraninger, a federal budget official. We'll take a look at her experience and why the White House says it chose her. Next, we'll discuss how the French government isn't very happy with General Electric's job creation progress in France. Before GE was allowed to buy the energy generation part of the French conglomerate Alsthom, it had a mandate to create a thousand jobs in the country. Then finally, we'll talk to Washington Post columnist Allan Sloan about how U.S.

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and it’s the on the rise, but we have no idea why.

“We have the science of suicide that we’ve paid for, which is to say ... not much,” said Dr. April Foreman at the American Association of Suicidology. “The reason we don’t have good answers is that we fund suicide-related research at a fraction of the other kinds of research for other causes of death.”

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service...Ongoing disagreement in Germany over asylum seekers is threatening Chancellor Angela Merkel’s leadership and could put her political future in jeopardy. How can the country’s government balance its own immigration challenges with broader policies across the European Union?  Then, the agriculture industry is challenged in northern Chile as people there struggle with a persistently dry climate amid years of drought. But innovative farmers have learned to harness the power of fog to help relieve their struggle.

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