Economy & Business

Business news

The cargo shipping industry is turning things around

Aug 18, 2017

After the Great Recession, the cargo shipping industry overestimated how fast the consumer economy would bounce back. It’s been a tough few years, with empty space on many cargo ships that carry furniture, clothes and office supplies — pretty much all the stuff Americans buy in stories. But now, old ships are getting replaced with a fewer number of new, bigger vessels, owned by fewer companies. All that efficiency has freight rates climbing.

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Rachel Abrams of The New York Times and Cardiff Garcia of FT Alphaville join us to discuss the week's business and economics news. On Friday, Stephen Bannon was pushed out of his role as chief strategist to president Donald Trump. We discuss what the move can mean for the markets. Also, we recap Trump’s stance on the violence in Charlottesville. With Trump alienating corporate America and Republicans admonishing him, can the White House withstand the latest political whiplash thrown its way?

China’s government today unveiled new rules for overseas investments by Chinese businesses. The rules discourage companies from what are called "irrational" acquisitions of assets in industries ranging from real estate to hotels and entertainment.  In recent years, China has invested heavily in the U.S. What will the new rules mean for U.S. businesses?

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Greenbelt, Maryland, can't hide its town pride

Aug 18, 2017

The U.S. government tried a different approach to public housing during the great depression by creating entire towns that were federally planned and subsidized. The idea was to build communities where poor Americans and displaced farmers could work. Only three of these "greenbelt towns" were built before the project ended. But those three towns still stand today as a reminder of the New Deal's history.

There is a lot of debate around office etiquette. In the past, Marketplace Weekend has spoken with Ask A Manager's Alison Green about the right way to handle job interviews and how to dress for the office. Now we're taking on the topic of kids at work. Is it ever appropriate?

Having a diverse workplace is a worthy investment

Aug 18, 2017

It may feel like the topic of diversity in the workplace pops up all the time. So many industries seem to struggle with it — Hollywood, media, Silicon Valley.

Coal under Trump: one miner’s perspective

Aug 18, 2017

At 11 p.m. on a recent Friday night, the West Elk Mine outside Somerset opened its gates. Cars and trucks started rolling out, signalling the end of a coal mining shift in this rural pocket of Colorado.

Workers had been opening up a new section of the mine 4 or 5 miles underground, a tough job made tougher considering that the current economics of the coal industry means fewer workers at the mine.

08/18/2017: Life in a "New Deal Utopia."

Aug 18, 2017

Steve Bannon has joined the list of recent White House departures, and with that, the prospect of a trade war with China got a little less likely. And that's good, because in spite of all the real economic competition between the world's two largest economies, they need each other. To that end: Beijing put out some new rules on overseas investments today, specifically limits on certain kinds of foreign acquisitions by Chinese companies. We'll talk about what that means. Then: During the Great Depression, the government started an experiment.

Can HR tell you what not to do and say outside of the office?

Aug 18, 2017

Last weekend's white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia has inspired an ongoing discussion about public hate speech and rallying as they relate to employment.

In the aftermath of the rally, several people have been identified on social media using photos taken of them carrying Nazi flags and other white supremacist paraphernalia. In the age of social media, the process of identifying people and tracking down their workplaces was speedy, and in the days after the rally, some people lost their jobs.

08/18/2017 Free speech, hate speech and work

Aug 18, 2017

In the wake of the white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, we dig into the nuances of how businesses handle the First Amendment and their own ethics policies. Plus, a discussion of the case for diversity in business, the question of whether you can bring your kids into the office and the ongoing debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement. 

 

 

08/18/2017: Globalization might be getting too much blame

Aug 18, 2017

Market players are concerned that President Trump's senior economic adviser, Gary Cohn, might resign over his disappointment with Trump's comments on the Charlottesville protests. But he's the one figure in the administration who gives Wall Street the most comfort, and he could become the next Fed Chair. On today's show, economist Christopher Low joins us to talk about the qualities someone should have to take on the most powerful economic policy position in the U.S.

President Trump pledged sweeping political and economic changes during the campaign. We have no idea if Trump can deliver on those promises, but we can explore what it’s going to take for him to try. It’s all in our series The Big Promise.

Rhonda Glover is between jobs as a home health care aide. For weeks, she’s been talking with different companies. Usually things are going well, she said, until the interviewer asks how will she get to work.

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Estee Lauder, meet Kylie Jenner

Aug 18, 2017

Estee Lauder announced earnings this morning. The cosmetics company beat estimates, reporting net income of $229 million, up from $94 million for the same period last year. Net sales rose 11 percent in the fourth quarter. Behind the numbers is the reality that established beauty brands like Estee are facing big challenges from beauty startups like Kylie Jenner's Kylie Cosmetics.

 

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In the week since a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville lead to deadly violence, some of the participants have been outed online and even fired from their jobs. Now, more protests and counter protests are springing up around the country. While the first amendment protects speech — including hate speech, the freedom to express your views and not run afoul of your employer can depend on where you live and who you work for. 

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