Economy & Business

Business news

Saudi Arabia is pushing for the biggest ever IPO

Apr 26, 2016
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JaeRan Kim

Saudi Arabia has begun releasing information on its ambitious plans to reform its economy away from oil dependence. Part of the plan includes offering up shares of state-owned oil company Aramco in what could be the largest-ever initial public offering. 

Though less than 5 percent of the company would be sold, such an offering would be expected to bring at least $100 billion. 

Marketplace Tech for Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Apr 26, 2016
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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about online campaign fundraising with BuzzFeed's Evan McMorris-Santoro; America's industrial technology landscape; and Twitter earnings. 

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about why Saudi Arabia plans to weaken its dependence on oil, and the fall of Mitsubishi's stock amid an emissions scandal.

Quirtina Crittenden was struggling to get a room on Airbnb. She would send a request to a host. Wait. And then get declined.

"The hosts would always come up with excuses like, 'oh, someone actually just booked it' or 'oh, some of my regulars are coming in town, and they're going to stay there,'" Crittenden said. "But I got suspicious when I would check back like days later and see that those dates were still available."

Charter Communications has bid more than $88 billion to buy its larger rival, Time Warner Cable, and a smaller competitor called Bright House Networks — and it's closing in on the required regulatory approval from federal authorities.

The deal would be yet another major shakeup in the telecom industry: It would form the second-largest Internet provider, behind Comcast, and the third-largest video provider, behind Comcast and the newly merged AT&T/DirecTV.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Gannett Co., owner of USA Today, is offering to buy Tribune Publishing in a deal valued at about $400 million. Tribune owns a number of papers in addition to the Chicago Tribune, including the Los Angeles Times and the Baltimore Sun.

This post was updated at 6:15 p.m. ET.

More than 550,000 people have signed a pledge to boycott Target over its restroom and dressing-room policy.

Last week, an NPR analysis found Hillary Clinton outperforms Bernie Sanders in the states with the most income inequality. This weekend on Meet the Press, host Chuck Todd asked about that trend we discovered: Why would Sanders do worse in those states when income inequality is his signature issue?

Sanders responded that "poor people don't vote."

We decided to look into that claim.

The Claim:

We want to hear from Uber drivers how much they made in a recent week. Drivers, it's information you can see on the app, when you review your weekly ride summary. Send us a screenshot — email tech@npr.org— and tell us how we can reach you.

If I told you there was a way to keep using your phone forever, would you want to?

In true unscientific form, I surveyed some phone users in downtown Washington, D.C.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Teaching personal finance at high schools

Apr 25, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about Obama's push for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) deal; the benefits of providing tuition reimbursement to your employees; and a Minnesota personal finance competition for high school students.  

Employers who help pay for tuition reap the rewards

Apr 25, 2016
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Mark Garrison

A new study says company-provided tuition assistance creates a big return for those companies, not just the employees upgrading their education.

In an analysis of the tuition reimbursement program at the health insurance company Cigna, a Lumina Foundation study said the insurer realized a 129 percent return on its investment in tuition reimbursement, in the form of personnel cost savings.

“We are definitely more likely to retain people if they’ve participated in the program,” said Karen Kocher, Cigna’s chief learning officer.

If I say it's artisanal... maybe it is

Apr 25, 2016
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Annie Baxter

Over the past few years, the word “artisan” has appeared on a growing number of mass-produced items — McDonald's "artisan grilled chicken sandwich" being but one example.

There are no rules dictating proper use of the term. For some people, it has become so overused as to lose its meaning.

A couple years ago, the research firm Canadean surveyed consumers about what they think “artisan” means. The greatest share, nearly a quarter, said they didn’t know. Others associated it with authenticity and features like a unique taste, high-quality ingredients or being “handmade.” 

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