Economy & Business

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The Los Angeles City Council voted today to raise the hourly minimum wage in the second-largest U.S. city from $9 to $15 by 2020 — a move that would cover as many as 800,000 people.

The Los Angeles Times has more on the vote:

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET

Japanese air bag supplier Takata says nearly 34 million vehicles were fitted with its defective inflator mechanisms, doubling the number of vehicles affected in the U.S., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Tuesday.

The recall is believed to be the largest in NHTSA's history.

The most luscious watermelon the Deep South has ever produced was once so coveted, 19th-century growers used poison or electrocuting wires to thwart potential thieves, or simply stood guard with guns in the thick of night. The legendary Bradford was delectable — but the melon didn't ship well, and it all but disappeared by the 1920s. Now, eight generations later, a great-great-great-grandson of its creator is bringing it back.

On Wall Street, Feb. 3, 2011, was mostly a ho-hum day. But not for companies that sell Medicare Advantage plans.

Several of those that offer the privately run Medicare coverage option hit the jackpot, tacking on billions of dollars in new value after federal officials signaled they might go easy on health plans suspected of overcharging the government.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Low oil prices have led to low gas prices in the United States, but not in Turkey, where gas is about $10 per gallon. Why would that be? We find out now from NPR's Peter Kenyon.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

During the worst of the Great Recession, summer travel plummeted as Americans chose backyard "staycations" over faraway vacations.

This year, millions of families are shaking off their reluctance to take big trips: Airlines say they are now expecting the busiest summer ever.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Worker-rights groups are calling labor conditions in Qatar "horrific" and urging FIFA sponsors to take responsibility ahead of the 2022 soccer World Cup. Their call comes on the same day the BBC said a reporting crew spent two nights in a Qatari jail for trying to film migrant workers who are building the infrastructure for the sporting event.

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