Economy & Business

Business news

In Florida, oranges are so important that they're on the state's license plates. But after 11 years of fighting a debilitating disease, Florida's citrus industry is in a sad state. The disease, called citrus greening, is caused by a bacterium that constricts a tree's vascular system, shriveling fruit and eventually killing the tree. The bacterium is spread by a tiny insect called a psyllid.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The debate over encryption and government access to secured communications dates decades back. But for many Americans, it grabbed their attention in the early months of this year, in the aftermath of the Dec. 2, 2015, mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Silicon Valley has reportedly done some soul-searching after last month's presidential election. Many in high-tech supported Hillary Clinton and have criticized Facebook and Google for being vehicles to spread fake news stories, many of which vilified Clinton.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Episode 739: Finding The Fake-News King

Dec 2, 2016

A few days before the election, an extraordinary story popped up in hundreds of thousands of people's Facebook feeds. This story was salacious. It was vivid, filled with intriguing details. There was a photo of a burning house, firemen rushing in. The headline read, "FBI Agent Suspected In Hillary Email Leaks Found Dead In Apparent Murder-Suicide."

The post-election uproar over fake news and far-right websites is taking its toll on the advertising industry. Kellogg's announced it is pulling ads from the site Breitbart — which publishes right-wing content. Other brands are planning similar moves. But there's one big reason to believe this is just a short-term reaction in the heat of the moment, not a long-term trend.

GettyImages-624448490.jpg
Kai Ryssdal

Another key job in the Trump administration has been filled. Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis is the president-elect's pick for Secretary of Defense and the official announcement comes Monday.

It is unconventional to name a retired general officer to run the Pentagon for several reasons, some of which Erin Simpson lays out in a new piece at the commentary website War on the Rocks.

GettyImages-460110345.jpg
Kai Ryssdal

There are some exciting new developments in the world of Snapchat — or rather, Snap Inc., their new name in a corporate re-branding undertaken by Chief Strategy Officer Imran Khan. According to Khan, Snap Inc. accommodates the company's expansion beyond social media into camera technology at large.

GettyImages-607363028.jpg
Mitchell Hartman

The November unemployment rate, at 4.6 percent, is low. But the jobs are still disappearing in some sectors. In manufacturing, for instance: down 4,000 jobs from October, continuing a long-term trend.

So what’s that mean for workers?

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Get ready for a higher-end cup of coffee

Dec 2, 2016
19452741770_8dea30c749_b.jpg
Marielle Segarra

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz is stepping out of daily operations at the coffee company to focus on the rollout of a new premium coffee brand, Starbucks Reserve. Schultz compared the effort to Ralph Lauren's launch of his high-end Purple label. But how has that brand done? And what lessons does Ralph Lauren have for Howard Schultz?

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Long and Short: Minimum wage and Gilmore Girls

Dec 2, 2016
GettyImages-612886478.jpg
Lizzie O'Leary and Hayley Hershman

The Los Angeles Times' Natalie Kitroeff and CNN Money's Tanzina Vega play the long and short game this week. They discuss fair wages, the myth of bringing jobs back to the U.S. and the "Gilmore Girls" revival.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

pg60-2.jpg
Daisy Palacios

The way Americans thought about house and home completely transformed between 1945-1973. The post-war period in America ushered in a big spike in spending on domestic goods, like appliances and decor. Home ownership rates increased, too. In 1940, 43.6 percent of Americans owned their home. By 1960, 61.9 percent did. This made the "nesting" aspect of Christmas, including exterior and interior decoration, a new category for holiday shopping.

Pages