Economy & Business

Business news

Snapchat...but for your face

Sep 26, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Snapchat has changed its name to Snap Inc. The company also announced its first wearable, called "Spectacles." Like the name says, its a pair of glasses that record video. Senior tech correspondent Molly Wood explains why wearable video capture is as obvious as the nose on your face. 

The company needs to grow:

"There's only so long that Snapchat alone, the sort of fun messaging company, can sustain you, so they're doing this very interesting and I would argue, related, growth strategy into capture, into cameras."

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Tony Wagner

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz endorsed his bitter primary rival and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump just last week, but he's made thousands renting out his supporters' email addresses to Trump for months.

Debate 1: Clinton, Trump and "achieving prosperity"

Sep 26, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are head to head for this, their first presidential debate, on Monday, Sept 26, 2016. The Marketplace team weighs in throughout the night.

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Lane Wallace

Rolling Stone Magazine is selling a 49 percent stake to BandLab, a music startup in Singapore.

That comes as print ad sales are down for the magazine, and it continues pushing its digital presence. The magazine, which built its reputation decades ago on its counterculture appeal and gonzo reporting style, has maintained some heavy-hitting reporting and a focus on the music industry even as it’s become significantly more mainstream.

Oculus Rift founder apologizes for funding pro-Trump group

Sep 26, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about Rolling Stone's decision to sell 49 percent of its stake to a music startup based in Singapore; why the U.S. Department of Education will no longer recognize the largest accreditor of for-profit colleges; and an apology from Palmer Luckey, the CEO of Oculus Rift, for funding a group that supports Trump.

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David Brancaccio

Of the 23 winners of the MacArthur 'genius' grants announced last Friday, one recipient was honored for financial innovation. Jose Quinoñez, founder and CEO of the San Francisco-based Mission Asset Fund, works with low-income people who often do not have bank accounts or much data in their credit files.

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D Gorenstein

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump square off in the first presidential debate Monday, and predictions are that over 100 million viewers will tune in. That would rank the event among the most-watched programs in TV history, and the broadcast and cable networks airing the debate hope to cash in.

The debate itself is ad-free, but broadcasters and cable networks will still cash in. Thirty-second spots before and after the debate are going for $200,000 to $250,000 on the national networks.

ITT Tech, Corinthian accreditor loses authority

Sep 26, 2016
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Kim Adams

The U.S. Department of Education has stopped recognizing the largest accreditor of for-profit colleges, citing numerous regulatory violations. The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools had given its stamp of approval to now-discredited schools such as ITT Tech and Corinthian College, among others.

Marketplace Tech for Monday, September 26, 2016

Sep 26, 2016
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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about the first 2016 presidential debate and news that questions gathered from Facebook will be allowed at the event; reports that Apple might be working on a smart-home device similar to Amazon Echo; and the possibility that BlackBerry might be getting out of the phone business. 

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about how the media plan to cash in on the first 2016 presidential debate, which is expected to attract up to 100 million viewers; look at reports that show German Chancellor Angela Merkel has ruled out a government bailout for Deutsche Bank; and interview Jose Quinonez, a winner of a MacArthur "Genius Grant" for financial innovation. 

The founder of Rolling Stone is selling a minority share of the fabled magazine to a Singapore-based social media entrepreneur, the first time an outside investor has been allowed to buy into the property.

Several media reports say Jann Wenner has decided to sell 49 percent of the magazine, as well as its digital assets, to BandLab Technologies, a social-networking site for musicians and fans.

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Kai Ryssdal

Don't listen to Molly Wood. This pumpkin spice thing is getting out of hand.

Trump's trade adviser on globalization and NAFTA

Sep 23, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

The presidential debates start next week, and voters have become more and more interested in each candidate’s plans for their potential terms in the White House.

One of republican nominee Donald Trump’s economic advisers is Daniel DiMicco, he is a retired chairman and CEO of Nucor Corporation and senior trade adviser for the Donald Trump Campaign. DiMicco spoke to Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about Trump’s economic policies, NAFTA, and what he plans to do if he takes office. Here are some interview highlights:

On NAFTA:

Alton Brown takes the Marketplace Quiz

Sep 23, 2016
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Raghu Manavalan

No matter who you are, you've probably had a rough day at the office that changed your perspective, or maybe you made an impulse purchase you really, really wish you could take back. This week, Alton Brown, author of "EveryDayCook" and self-described "poly-culinary hypenate," took our money-inspired personality questionnaire. 

Fill in the blank, money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you _______.

Facebook miscalculated video numbers for two years

Sep 23, 2016
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Reema Khrais

In this advertisement from the Tex Mex restaurant Chuy's, the average view for the video was 100 percent. That means everyone who saw the ad supposedly watched it from start to end. 

"I don't think it's mathematically possible," said Kristen Sussman, founder and president of social media agency, Social Distillery. 

But after Facebook apologized Friday for miscalculating an important video metric for two years, the inflated numbers make more sense, Sussman said.

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