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Time now for The Call-In. And today we're talking about the child care challenges of summer. We asked you to share your plans.

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And for American entrepreneurs who looked at Cuba and saw an untapped market of more than 11 million people, Trump's new policy is disappointing. Charles Lane from member station WSHU reports.

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Jun 17, 2017

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When the news broke that Amazon had agreed to buy Whole Foods for $13.7 billion, the retail food sector went a little bananas.

The stock prices of large food retail chains, such as Costco, tumbled a bit.

And this headline from Business Insider helps explain it: Amazon is acquiring Whole Foods — and Walmart, Target, and Kroger should be terrified.

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Amazon said today it's buying the supermarket Whole Foods in a deal valued at nearly $14 billion. This is by far the largest acquisition Amazon has ever made. It also means big changes are ahead for the grocery business. NPR's Alina Selyukh reports.

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Marketplace

Amid reports that President Trump is under investigation for obstruction of justice, we talk with a former White House insider about what happens to the business of government when the president faces legal action. Plus: Why street vendors, and not doctors, are the main source for medicine in Haiti. Then: How a trip to a theme park could be the best financial education your child will ever get. And staying with the kids: School's out!

For many Haitians, street dispensaries are the only source of medicine

Jun 16, 2017

What's a street dispensary? It's "a sort of chemical Babel Tower," according to Arnaud Robert, who reported on these Haitian pharmacies for the June 2017 issue of National Geographic. But the street vendors are not pharmacists, and their wares are not regulated. This illegal, ubiquitous medical practice can have serious consequences for the health of many Haitians. But, Robert told us, Haitians have very few choices.

At Yale University's commencement ceremony last month, hundreds of graduating students and their supporters staged a labor protest. The dispute pits graduate student teachers who voted to form a union in February against a Yale administration that refuses to bargain and disputes the election's validity.

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Eliza Mills

It's been a busy week when it comes to presidential lawsuits. The attorneys general of Maryland and Washington, D.C., are suing President Trump, alleging that his business interests leave him "deeply enmeshed" with foreign and domestic governments, violating the emolument clause in the Constitution.

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Dan Kraker

Three decades ago, Duluth, Minnesota, was in the doldrums. A steel mill had just closed. Unemployment was more than 20 percent. Someone posted a billboard on the way out of town that read: "Last one out, turn out the lights."

"We were as Rust Belt as they come," recalled Andy Goldfine, who in 1984 rented an old three-story brick building, bought a bunch of used sewing machines and started a company called Aerostich. His vision was to make motorcycle gear for hard-core riders to wear over their work clothes.

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Robert Garrova

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

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