Economy & Business

Business news

Corporate inversion rules go back on the table

Apr 21, 2017

President Trump signed an order directing a review of all tax regulations that might unduly burden U.S. corporations. That could lead to a rollback of an Obama order that sought to limit corporate inversions — when a U.S. company moves its corporate address to a foreign country to pay lower taxes. A rollback would line up with Republican party wishes, but would fly in the face of putting America first.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Musician Tei Shi takes the Marketplace Quiz

Apr 21, 2017
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Hayley Hershman

No matter who you are, you've probably had a rough day at the office that changed your perspective, or maybe you made an impulse purchase you really, really wish you could take back. This week, musician Tei Shi took our money-inspired personality questionnaire. Her latest album, "Crawl Space," is out now.

Below is an edited transcript of the conversation.

In a next life, what would your career be?

How to ace a job interview? We asked a manager

Apr 21, 2017
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Lizzie O'Leary and Hayley Hershman

Want to work? Chances are you'll need to interview. Trying to charm a potential employer isn't everyone's idea of fun, but Yale professor Jason Dana questions whether job interviews are useful at all.

Some of you reached out to Marketplace Weekend with your thoughts:

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Ben Bergman

TV and movie writers are worried about the future as their payments go down while the studios' profits go up. Their union, the Writers Guild of America, is in the process of negotiating their new contract; their current contract expires May 1. The Guild is asking members to give authorization for a potential strike. Here’s some background on the situation:

It seems like there are more TV shows than ever. Why are writers unhappy?

Paradoxically, as the number of shows has increased, writers say their earnings have decreased 23 percent in the last two years. 

Dairy woes rattle U.S.-Canada relationship

Apr 21, 2017

President Trump is criticizing Canada over its recent pricing changes for dairy products that make some U.S. imports less competitive. The Trump administration said that's hurting dairy farmers in states like Wisconsin and New York. 

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Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Digital Industrial Revolution.

About Jeremy Howard's TED Talk

Data Scientist Jeremy Howard has studied machine learning for 25 years. He says artificial intelligence can help achieve amazing things. But he warns the impact on jobs may cause a great deal of social instability.

About Jeremy Howard

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Digital Industrial Revolution.

About Maurice Conti's TED Talk

Futurist Maurice Conti says we've entered a new era where machines and humans partner to do what neither can do alone. He calls it the "Augmented Age."

About Maurice Conti

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Digital Industrial Revolution.

About Erik Brynjolfsson's TED Talk

MIT Professor Erik Brynjolfsson sees a bright future where machines serve as powerful tools and partners. But he says we can only shape this future if we keep up with the pace of innovation.

About Erik Brynjolfsson

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Digital Industrial Revolution.

About Marco Annunziata's TED Talk

GE's Chief Economist Marco Annunziata is optimistic about "the marriage of minds and machines" — provided we manage it the right way.

About Marco Annunziata

German federal prosecutors say the bombing of a soccer team's bus in Dortmund, Germany, was carried out by a man apparently attempting to manipulate the team's stock for profit. The 28-year-old man has been arrested and charged with attempted murder, among other things.

Three explosions went off near the Borussia Dortmund team bus on April 11, as it was pulling out of the hotel where the players were staying. One player was injured and needed surgery on his wrist.

3 ways to protect your online privacy

Apr 21, 2017
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Lizzie O'Leary and Eliza Mills

Ed Stroz knows online security. He's a former FBI agent who started the agency's computer crimes division. Now he runs security firm Stroz Friedberg, which helps businesses design products with internet protections in mind. 

In the wake of the recent congressional vote to roll back the Federal Communications Commission's Obama-era internet privacy rules, concern about online security threats — including malware, hacking and the selling of personal data — has grown.

04/21/2017: Facts still matter

Apr 21, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal

President Trump said today his tax reform plan is gonna be ready on Wednesday. While we're waiting, it's worth talking about where exactly our tax dollars are going. A new website called USAFacts is trying to help folks get their hands on all that data. Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is behind it, and he came on to chat. Plus: The Trump administration is taking on inversions and Canadian dairy trade rules while France takes on globalization. And, as always, we recap the week in economic news in about five minutes or less.

04/21/2017: Where does Uber go from here?

Apr 21, 2017

As federal funds for research are threatened and White House climate change plans are canceled, students are trying to stand up in the name of science. Thousands are set to march this weekend, many of whom will include Caltech students. We visited the campus to chat with the community about why they personally want to get involved. Next, we'll discuss Uber's declining popularity with corporate customers, and then look at the arrest of a 28-year-old man in Germany who's connected to last week's explosions. 

A new report out this week shows that Uber’s long string of bad PR could be costing it corporate customers. Uber is still the dominant ride-hailing app by far, but Lyft appears to be gaining ground in business travel.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

 

Housing growth is stunted by a lack of supply

Apr 21, 2017

The job market is firm, consumer confidence is high and mortgage rates are low. Perfect conditions for a strong housing market. Yet, inventory of new homes and sales of existing homes remain depressed. And that's putting a big crimp on growth. 

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