Economy & Business

The Two-Way
9:47 am
Tue July 15, 2014

NPR News Executive Leaves For Job At The Atlantic

Margaret Low Smith is leaving her post as NPR News' senior vice president to become president of AtlanticLIVE.
Stephen Voss NPR

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 11:14 am

Margaret Low Smith, a longtime NPR executive who has served as senior vice president for news for three years, is leaving the company to become the president of The Atlantic's live events business.

"Her departure will be felt as profoundly as any in recent memory," NPR Chief Content Officer Kinsey Wilson wrote in a memo to staff Tuesday.

He added that Smith's final day at NPR will be at the end of July. She joined the company in 1982 as an overnight production assistant on Morning Edition.

Wilson added that:

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The Two-Way
7:06 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Tobacco Giant Reynolds American To Buy Lorillard In $27B Deal

Cigarette maker Reynolds American, which makes Camel, said it's buying Lorillard Inc. for $27 billion.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 10:41 am

Cigarette giant Reynolds American announced Tuesday that it's buying rival Lorillard in a $27 billion deal that unites two of the country's biggest tobacco companies.

The acquisition creates a giant to rival Philip Morris USA, which is owned by Altria Group Inc., the No. 1 tobacco company in the country. Altria's Marlboro brand dominates the U.S. cigarette market.

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Business
6:24 am
Tue July 15, 2014

VW To Expand Chattanooga Plant

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:18 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Employees Criticize CIA Cafeteria, FOI Request Reveals

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:53 am

The news website MuckRock published complaints about the CIA cafeteria which came from a 2010 Freedom of Information Act request. Spies prefer individual ketchup packets to pump dispensers.

Parallels
2:32 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Kurds May Have Oil To Export, But Buyers Are Harder To Find

A tanker carrying crude oil from Iraq's Kurdish region anchors near Ashkelon, Israel. It's believed the oil has been off-loaded into Israel. The U.S. and Baghdad oppose the Kurdish export of oil from the autonomous northern region.
David Buimovitch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 8:14 am

Kurdish security forces, the peshmerga, have taken over two major oil fields near Kirkuk, in northern Iraq. The fields have the potential to put billions of dollars into the coffers of the Kurdish regional government.

But there's a hitch: Even if the Kurdish government has control of the oil, it doesn't necessarily mean it can export it — thanks to the Baghdad government and the U.S.

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Business
2:31 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Leased Solar Panels Can Cast A Shadow Over A Home's Value

Mark Bortman of Exact Solar in Yardley, Pa., says having leased solar panels on a roof can add an extra step when selling a house. He says typically a buyer will assume the remainder of the lease, but that requires a credit check and some paperwork
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 10:11 am

Installing solar panels on a house to generate electricity often costs $20,000 or more, and many homeowners have turned to leasing programs to avoid those upfront costs. But most leases are for 20 years, and that can present problems if someone wants to sell the house before the lease is completed.

Peter Auditore of El Granada, Calif., was happy with the leased solar panels he installed a few years back. When he decided to sell, he found a buyer who also appreciated the environmental benefits of solar panels. But then there was a hitch just as the sale was about to go through.

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Media
3:15 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

The Rise Of The Online Rebuttal — And How It's Making Waves In Print

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 5:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
3:15 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Citigroup Agrees To $7 Billion Fine For 'Egregious' Misconduct

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 5:24 pm

Citigroup has agreed to pay $7 billion to settle claims that it committed fraud when it sold mortgage-backed securities in the years leading up to the financial crisis. Most of the money will be paid to the U.S. Treasury, but some will be used to provide mortgage relief to struggling homeowners.

All Tech Considered
3:15 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

In Europe, Google Stumbles Between Free Speech And Privacy

A Google search removal request is displayed on the screen of a smartphone in London. The company says it has received more than 70,000 takedown requests following a European court ruling.
Dominic Lipinski PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 5:24 pm

Google is trying to make sense of a sweeping decision about the Internet. In May, the European Court of Justice ruled that people have the right to be forgotten. That is, if you don't like something about you that pops up on a Google search, you can make Google hide that result.

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Author Interviews
2:34 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

How A Factory Man Fought To Save His Furniture Company

Author Beth Macy worked for years as a reporter for the Roanoke Times. "When I became a journalist, I gravitated to those kinds of stories of what I call 'outsiders and underdogs,' " she says.
David Hungate Courtesy of Little, Brown and Co.

In the town of Bassett in southern Virginia, some of the downtown street lights are dark. The lamps, maintained by the once prosperous Bassett Furniture Co., are now funded by voluntary contributions from residents and businesses — when they can afford it.

Bassett is just one of many towns and cities in Virginia and North Carolina where scores of furniture-making plants have closed in the past 20 years, mostly because of competition from China and other foreign countries.

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