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At the public library in the rural Morgan County town of Brush, Colo., Marissa Velazquez welcomes her students to class. It's a sunny Saturday morning, and the day marks the halfway point in Velazquez's class, a 10-week crash course on American history, civics and English.

Nearly all of the students work in either meatpacking or dairying. Everyone in it has the same goal: become an American citizen. In two hours, Velazquez runs through voting rights, the legislative process and some grammar tips.

Pop quiz: When do we celebrate the venerable American holiday of Flag Day?

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04/21/2017: Rage against the machines

Apr 21, 2017
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Marketplace

We’re expecting another series of executive orders from President Trump that'll deal with taxes and financial regulations. Marketplace's Kimberly Adams explains what's in store for our financial future. Afterwards, as part of our "Robot-Proof Jobs" series, we'll chat with Thomas Kalil, a former deputy director for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Kalil shares how we can apply AI to the classroom to teach tech skills and beat a robot takeover. 

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JaeRan Kim

Thousands of people in dozens of cities across the country will take to the streets on Saturday in the name of science. Science is meant to be nonpartisan, but with federal funds for research in question and the White House cancelling its climate change plans, some scientists feel called to defend their profession.

“Hello, do you wanna sign a banner for the March for Science?"  

Tess Saxton-Fox and Magnus Haw were recently handing out info on the March for Science and hawking orange T-shirts — really orange T-shirts — for $5. 

Robot-Proof Jobs 3: Rewiring the future

Apr 21, 2017
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David Brancaccio and Katie Long

The final episode of a special three-part podcast series on automation and the economy. If technology makes humans obsolete, how do we make a living? Plus: Think you know which jobs would survive a robot takeover? Take our quiz here: marketplace.org/robotproof

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Marketplace

The Samsung Galaxy S8 hits stores today, with its makers hoping it'll make you forget about the iPhone and that other Samsung phone with exploding batteries. Geoffrey Fowler, personal tech columnist for the Wall Street Journal, stopped by tell us all about the new device's features, and how it compares with Apple's products. Afterwards, we'll check out the rise of tech in Phoenix, Arizona, and then play this week's Silicon Tally with NASA's Daniel Lockney, whose job includes helping NASA technology find uses in places here on earth. 

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Marketplace staff

German police today arrested a 28-year-old man known as Sergej W. in connection with explosions last week that targeted a German soccer team's bus. The possible motive: an elaborate scheme to manipulate a stock.

Authorities are now saying the incident has no extremist connection. Two people were hurt during the April 11 attack, including a player with shrapnel wounds.

A demographic crisis looms over Maine, the oldest and whitest state in the U.S. with one of the country's lowest birth rates.

Employers are already feeling the effects on Maine's workforce as they struggle to fill positions with "old Mainers" — long-time residents in a state where many take pride in their deep family roots, especially along the shores of Washington County.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It began with a simple idea: provide a safe place in Boston where ex-cons and former gang members can work out, find support and maybe even get a job. The result is InnerCity Weightlifting, a nonprofit also known as ICW that connects them with job training, workout clients and a chance at a new life.

Just about all of the trainers have done significant time in jail. They've shot people and been shot at. Dan Royal grew up in Boston and was 11 the first time he was arrested on a shooting charge.

Tim Wharton bristles at being called a "foodie," with its connotation of lush, sumptuous "food porn." He prefers "gastronaut," a label popularized by late British television chef Keith Floyd, for its evocation of intrepid culinary exploration.

Updated at 6:00 p.m. ET

General Motors has stopped operations in Venezuela after its only plant there was illegally seized by authorities, the automaker says in a statement. The details are murky: Multiple employees at the plant tell NPR that they believe auto dealers, not government officials, were responsible for the takeover.

The seizure happened Wednesday, as the "mother of all protests" brought hundreds of thousands of people into the streets to demonstrate against socialist President Nicolas Maduro.

I just copied your boss on this email

Apr 20, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

It’s no secret that workplaces can feel like a battlefield. There are workers competing for the same promotion. People worried about whether their boss likes them or whether a co-worker is secretly taking credit for their hard work or ideas. Then there are all those emails to decode and consider.

There is one exception, however. The dreaded boss cc. Everyone knows exactly what it means — your co-worker wants your boss to be privy to your conversation.

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