Economy & Business

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We hate to break it to you, Mr. Leprechaun, but someone really is after your Lucky Charms: General Mills.

Or more specifically, it's after the artificial colorings used to give the cereal its trademark rainbow-colored marshmallow shapes. General Mills on Monday announced it will remove artificial colors and flavors from all of its cereals.

People who love to craft sparkly holiday décor and make their own milk carton citrus soaps have looked to Martha Stewart for more than 20 years. And today, the upscale DIY queen's company is at the center of what Stewart calls "a transformational merger."

Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia says in a statement that it has agreed to be acquired by Sequential Brands Group.

Marriage And Work Over Time

In the early 1970s, there was a standard model for married couples where at least one spouse worked full time: In two-thirds of those marriages, the man worked and the woman didn't.

Over the next several decades, that changed dramatically, as more and more women moved into full-time jobs.

By the turn of the century, the standard had reversed: In nearly two-thirds of these marriages, both people worked full time.

It's late on a Tuesday morning and — as it's done every day for decades — the Patrick Gannaway towboat pushes its two barges up the Mississippi River right through downtown Minneapolis.

To get its 2,400 tons of sand, gravel, and limestone past the river's only waterfall, the barges take a five-story vertical ride inside the Upper St. Anthony Falls lock.

European leaders hold an emergency summit in Brussels on Monday in an effort to prevent Greece from defaulting on its debts. Greece owes the International Monetary Fund $1.8 billion by the end of this month, and it needs Europe's help to make the payment. But the Athens government is refusing to commit to an economic overhaul package that officials are demanding.

Greece has come close to default many times before — only to work out a last-minute compromise with its creditors. This time, though, it faces much longer odds.

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Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

When Betsy Freeman moved to Damascus, Md., 30 years ago, the first thing she looked for was a local community newspaper.

Along with meeting her new neighbors, Freeman met the Gazette.

"The Gazette papers were the thing that really welcomed you into the community," she says.

She's now mourning the loss of the Montgomery and Prince George's county Gazettes, which closed their doors last week after more than 55 years.

New York state's Seneca Lake is the heart of the Finger Lakes, a beautiful countryside of steep glacier-carved hills and long slivers of water with deep beds of salt. It's been mined on Seneca's shore for more than a century.

The Texas company Crestwood Midstream owns the mine now, and stores natural gas in the emptied-out caverns. It has federal approval to increase the amount, and it's seeking New York's OK to store 88 million gallons of propane as well.

Noisy trolleys roll bales of tobacco on and off the auction floors in Harare, Zimbabwe's capital. Here they call it "green gold." Some of the country's estimated 100,000 small-scale tobacco farmers look on, hoping for profitable sales.

Auctioneers, quoting prices at high speed, pace up and down rows of extra-large jute-covered bundles, with yellow tobacco leaves spilling out.

Locally Sourced Vegetarian Citrus Fizz? $5.99. Grass Fed Himalayan Tuna Salad? That'll be $9.99. Taking gentrification and a rent hike into your own hands? Priceless.

That's how the neighbors at Jesse's Deli in Brooklyn's Boerum Hill neighborhood are trying to save their local convenience store.

Owner Jesse Itayim opened his doors in 1984 at the corner of Bergen and Bonds Avenue, spending time in that location and another before moving to his current location, 402 Atlantic Ave., in 1989.

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