Economy & Business

Business news

(Markets Edition) The 10-year bond yield is actually up 3.19 percent, one of several signs that the U.S. economy is gaining strength. We talk to economist Diane Swonk for more. In healthcare news, a Kaiser Family Foundation survey has found that employers are paying more for each employee’s health plans. We look at how the employees are also paying more.

An annual assessment by the Center for Political Accountability shows many S&P 500 companies are spending less on direct donations to political races and election-related causes than in recent years. Additionally, those S&P 500 companies that are still making political donations are moving toward more transparency. Changing political winds and growing publicity risks have created a climate in which major corporations are finding it’s safer to cut direct political ties.

Beth Kobliner on how parents can maximize FAFSA's potential

Oct 4, 2018

If you're the parent of a high-schooler, there's a "talk" you should be having with them. No, it's not the one you think.

On Oct. 1, the federal financial aid application process — also known as FAFSA — opened for the 2019-2020 academic year, which could bring to light questions about the economic realities of a college education and more importantly, who's footing the bill and how. 

(U.S. Edition) A stronger U.S. economy means that more U.S. bonds have been selling off, which means a boost to the 10-year treasury yield. Marketplace’s Tracey Samuelson helps explain more. Then we look into the story of Chinese agents using computer chips to possibly hack into computers used by Amazon, Apple and the U.S. government. Also, a year ago Friday, the bombshell story about Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein’s predatory behavior surfaced, sparking the #MeToo movement.

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Good morning, I'm Rachel Martin. A discount airline ticket has risks. But what's the worst that can happen - no leg room, bad snacks? Turns out, the worst that can happen is that the airline folds and doesn't tell you.

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Big banks fear recession after Brexit

Oct 4, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... The U.K. could tip in to another recession after it leaves the European Union, warns the Royal Bank of Scotland's (RBS) chief executive Ross McEwan. Two Japanese giants have made a deal to create a "mobility network" intended to change public transport, healthcare and office work – we hear about a new multimillion dollar partnership between Toyota and Softbank. It's Super Thursday in the U.K., the biggest day of the year for publishers releasing new books for a place in the Christmas bestseller lists.

How #MeToo has (or hasn't) changed business as usual, one year later

Oct 4, 2018

Nearly one year ago, news regarding the deep-rooted, sexually harassing behavior from Hollywood power player Harvey Weinstein shone a light on a culture of impropriety and predatory behavior that had permeated the entertainment industry. It also ignited the #MeToo movement, where people felt empowered to share their stories of harassment in an effort to bring the offenders — some of them powerful or famous — to some kind of justice. The movement and the sense of awareness it has brought with it has spread to other areas of society, include the corporate workplace.

Automation is coming. And although it's inevitably going to take jobs away, it's also going to create millions of new jobs, make production more efficient and kickstart entire new industries. The countries that invest in automation early, and in the retraining that will help workers transition to new types of jobs, could really jump ahead economically. That's partly why automation is a huge part of the Chinese government's Made in China 2025 initiative. That’s the country's plan to reduce its reliance on outside technology and create a tech economy that rivals the West.

Automation is coming. And although it's inevitably going to take jobs away, it's also going to create millions of new jobs, make production more efficient and kickstart entire new industries. The countries that invest in automation early, and in the retraining that will help workers transition to new types of jobs, could really jump ahead economically. That's partly why automation is a huge part of the Chinese government's Made in China 2025 initiative.

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Air travelers frustrated by having very little legroom and narrow seats might finally see some relief under legislation passed Wednesday by the U.S. Senate. A bill reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration, which passed on a vote of 93-6, includes a provision requiring the FAA to set a minimum size for commercial airplane seats, including a minimum pitch, or distance between seats.

Airlines have been shrinking that distance in recent years in order to cram more seats and passengers onto planes and squeeze more revenue out of each flight.

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Donald Trump has described himself for decades as a self-made billionaire, claiming that he built his fortune using a onetime loan from his father.

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