Economy & Business

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Members of the Asian-American rock band The Slants have the right to call themselves by a disparaging name, the Supreme Court says, in a ruling that could have broad impact on how the First Amendment is applied in other trademark cases.

The Slants' frontman, Simon Tam, filed a lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office kept the band from registering its name and rejected its appeal, citing the Lanham Act, which prohibits any trademark that could "disparage ... or bring ... into contemp[t] or disrepute" any "persons, living or dead," as the court states.

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Marketplace Weekend Staff

Can peer pressure push people to investment in thousands of dollars worth of home improvements? Google hopes so. Project Sunroof, one of the tech giant's latest ventures, uses maps to show people which of their neighbors have installed solar panels. Google is hoping that if you've been toying with the idea of installing solar, a little keeping up with the Joneses might speed things along.

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Marketplace

You've probably heard the Senate is working on a health care bill. So far there's no public drafts, no hearing, no CBO score, no nothing. But it's there, according to the small group of Senators who are trying to put it up for a vote before July 4. The whole situation is a conundrum for lobbyists and interest groups. Their whole business is legislation, but how can you get a seat at the table when there is no table? Then, speaking of Congress: rank-and-file members are facing shrinking staffs and an ambitious legislative agenda. What could go wrong?

06/19/2017: Getting rid of those government floppy disks

Jun 19, 2017

The tech world's top CEOs are in D.C. today to meet with President Trump about how to help the government run more efficiently. We'll talk about some of the plans the White House in store, which includes an upgrade of of the government's computer systems. Afterwards, we'll look at whether Phoenix's power grid will be able to handle the Southwest's heatwave, and then discuss California's plans to change its fishing license system so that more people will go fishing.

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Adam Allington

The CEOs of companies including, Apple, Google, Amazon and Microsoft are in Washington D.C. today for the second White House Technology Summit. It’s been six months since President Trump's last roundtable with Silicon Valley leaders.

Despite being largely against Trump’s positions at the time, there was at least a cautious sense they might be able to work together on issues such as cyber security and job creation.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're getting another small clue about President Trump's overall financial picture after the president released some disclosure forms late last week. What did they say? Here's NPR's Jim Zarroli.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It’s likely that the heat wave California, Arizona and Nevada has been experiencing is going to hit its peak this week. Temperatures could reach as high as 120 degrees in Phoenix. Across the region, the air conditioning will be roaring. But will the power grid be able to keep up? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Larry Buhl

The California Legislature is considering a proposal to link the cost of a traffic ticket to a person’s ability to pay. Supporters say if it becomes law, it will keep minor traffic violations from pushing low-income California drivers deep into debt. And, it could help the state recoup tens of millions of dollars in delinquent fines that people just can’t afford to pay.

06/19/2017: The complications of Brexit

Jun 19, 2017
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Marketplace

Negotiators are still trying to figure out just how the U.K. will exit the European Union. We'll talk about some of the key issues surrounding the end of their relationship, which includes questions about what to do with Europeans living in the U.K. and British people living in the EU. Afterwards, we'll discuss Oregon's decision to let residents list "X" for their gender on their driver's licenses or state IDs, and then look at a California proposal that would lower traffic fines for low-income drivers. 

Do open-space offices really make us more productive?

Jun 18, 2017
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Adrienne Hill and Jana Kasperkevic

During lunch on a recent weekday, Carolina Donlan, who works at an outpatient clinic in New York, could be spotted outside enjoying the warm weather.

“In my perfect office, I can see outside,” she said when asked about her ideal workspace. “Have a big window. I can see the nature. I can make my own tea, I don’t have to get out. I can have a big beautiful leather couch where I can relax. I work in mental health. You have to do your own mental health.” 

06/19/2017: Planning a chance encounter

Jun 18, 2017
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Marketplace

Perhaps you've seen pics of Apple's new campus in Cupertino. It's futuristic, elegant and reportedly costs about $5 billion. Lord Norman Foster, one of the lead architects on the project, shared with us how the design came to be and how architecture can be "a force for good." Afterwards, we'll look at the link between workplace design and productivity. Ben Waber, CEO of Humanyze, explains why so many companies rely on big, open workspaces, and what he thinks a next-generation tech office space should look like. 

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF CORDUROI'S "MY DEAR")

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Time now for The Call-In. And today we're talking about the child care challenges of summer. We asked you to share your plans.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Hi.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Hello.

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