Economy & Business

Business news

In just about every occupation, women earn less than men. For every dollar that a man makes, his female colleague earns about 80 cents, according  to the U.S. Department of Labor. On top of that, white, non-Hispanic and Asian women outearn Black and Hispanic women. In fact, the U.S. ranks at No. 49 in countries making the most progress toward equal pay.

(Markets Edition) President Trump is releasing his 2019 budget proposal today, which will call for $4 trillion in spending. We'll take a look at where the White House is allocating some of this money. Afterwards, we'll talk to economist Julia Coronado from MacroPolicy Perspectives about this week's upcoming temperature reading on inflation, and then discuss  China's social credit system, which punishes people who engage in behavior deemed "anti-social."

The budget plan passed in the wee hours of the night on Friday not only put a quick end to the second shutdown of 2018 but also temporarily breathed life into several expired tax deductions. Under the plan many of these tax breaks were only extended retroactively for 2017. As such, their future remains uncertain.

(U.S. Edition) Now that Congress has struck a budget deal and passed a tax bill, President Trump is moving on to infrastructure. We'll look at where the White House plans to get the money for its projects and why it'll be tough. Afterwards, we'll discuss the billions that this flu season could cost in lost productivity, and then talk to five people named Jerome Powell about their thoughts on the economy.

Flu season could cost employers billions of dollars

Feb 12, 2018

Since flu season began in October, roughly 30 of Dan Turner’s 140 employees have called in sick. His response to them?   

“Rest, get lots of fluids, and did you remember to get your flu shot?” said Turner, president of IT consulting firm, TCG. “Hopefully they did because we actually paid for them to get the flu shots.”

President Trump to outline infrastructure plan

Feb 12, 2018

Budget deal … done. Tax plan … done. Now to infrastructure reform. President Donald Trump is set to release his plan for how to update the nation’s roads, bridges and water systems today. If this all sounds familiar, it’s because the White House has been promising the plan was coming “soon” since Trump came to office. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Australia’s biggest banks, among the world’s most profitable, are being accused of exploiting customers and corporate fraud. We’ll explain what a landmark inquiry is looking into. Then, the latest developments after a World War II-era bomb discovered in the River Thames brought London’s City Airport – frequented by European business travelers – to a standstill this morning. Afterward, how migration and the rise of the far right have become big issues for Italians heading to the polls for national elections next month.  

Bitcoin is a hassle ... but maybe not for long

Feb 12, 2018

Buying and selling with cryptocurrencies is hard. Every time you make a transaction, it's recorded in the blockchain, a digital ledger. That takes up a lot of resources, such as hard drive space. But a new technology called the Lightning Network could offer a way to speed up the process. It's a huge change in how cryptocurrencies could work. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke about it with Timothy Lee, a reporter at the tech news site Ars Technica. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Here's what five people named Jerome Powell think about the economy

Feb 12, 2018

Formal economic data suggest the U.S. economy is heating up to the point that policymakers might want to tap on the brakes a few times this year by raising interest rates.

Buying and selling things with cryptocurrencies is hard. Every time you make any transaction, it's recorded in the blockchain, a digital ledger. That takes up a ton of resources, such as hard drive space. But a new technology called the Lightning Network could offer a way to speed up the process. It's a huge change in how cryptocurrencies could work. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke about it with Timothy Lee, a reporter at the tech news site Ars Technica.   

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Senators begin a debate on immigration today. And, Steve, this could sort of be a free for all, right?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was created after the financial crisis to protect Americans from being ripped off by financial firms.

Now, President Trump's interim appointee to run the bureau, Mick Mulvaney, is making radical changes to deter the agency from aggressively pursuing its mission.

Updated at 11:35 a.m. ET

The wild swings in the stock market in the last two weeks grabbed headlines and were hard to miss for most Americans.

But do those market gyrations actually affect anyone's day-to-day finances?

Relatively few Americans actively trade or own stocks. But a 10 percent drop in the markets can affect our attitudes about the economy, even for those who don't invest, says James Poterba, president of the National Bureau of Economic Research and an economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

President Trump will finally be unveiling his long-awaited $1.5 trillion plan to repair and rebuild the nation's crumbling highways, bridges, railroads, airports, seaports and water systems Monday. But, the proposal will not be one that offers large sums of federal funding to states for infrastructure needs, but it is instead a financing plan that shifts much of the funding burden onto the states and onto local governments.

Pages