Education

NPR Ed
7:03 am
Mon January 26, 2015

Competency-Based Degree Programs On The Rise

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:22 pm

Competency-based education is in vogue — even though most people have never heard of it, and those who have can't always agree on what it is.

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Secret Lives Of Teachers
7:13 am
Sun January 25, 2015

'Walking The Walk' With Students ... And Screaming Fans

Elementary teachers Nicola Berlinsky, Joanie Pimentel and Lisa Pimentel perform as the punk band No Small Children.
Michael Dann

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:52 am

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Artist? Carpenter? Quidditch player? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

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Around the Nation
4:02 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

By Dimming Its Lights, Museum Opens Doors For Kids With Autism

One Saturday each month, the Pacific Science Center of Seattle opens early for people with autism spectrum disorders.
John Keatley Pacific Science Center

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:18 am

On a Saturday at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Wash., life-size robotic dinosaurs roar. A giant video monitor shows a person sneezing as a spray of mist shoots down from the ceiling. Nearby, naked mole rats scurry blindly through a maze of tunnels.

And since it's all mud and rain outside, the place is packed with curious children and adults trying to keep up with them.

Loud noises, bright lights, crowded spaces: This is exactly the situation Mike Hiner tries to avoid with his 20-year-old son Steven, who is autistic.

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Politics
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

U.S. Once Had Universal Child Care, But Rebuilding It Won't Be Easy

Julie Byard, head of a Detroit nursery, tells children stories and sings them songs prior to their afternoon nap in 1942.
AP

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:41 pm

Stumping in Kansas after his State of the Union, the president said that for most parents working today, child care is more than a "side issue," and that improving access "is a national economic priority for all of us."

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NPR Story
4:24 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

UVA Sororities Push To Host Their Own Parties

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 2:49 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Nicolette Gendron, a member of Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority at the University of Virginia and a writer for the C-Ville Weekly. She did a survey of sorority members on campus about how they would feel if sororities were allowed to serve alcohol and host parties under the same rules as fraternities. She says most women, including herself, feel that women would have more control and feel safer from sexual predation if they could host parties in their own houses.

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Education
2:14 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

How UWM's Golda Meir Library Continues to Evolve

Tom Luljak and guests
Credit Jon Strelecki

With more than 5 million books and other cataloged items, the UWM Libraries are an amazing reservoir of knowledge.

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NPR Ed
2:39 am
Thu January 22, 2015

The Past, Present And Future Of High-Stakes Testing

PublicAffairs Books

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 11:57 am

After a long stretch as the law of the land, annual standardized tests are being put to, well, the test.

This week, the Senate education committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law and, specifically, on testing. The committee's chairman, Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., has released a draft bill offering a lot more leeway to states in designing their own assessment systems.

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NPR Ed
10:06 am
Wed January 21, 2015

State Of The Union: A Quick Wrap On Education

President Obama delivers his State of the Union address in Washington on Tuesday.
Kevin Dietsch UPI/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 3:25 pm

Right off the bat, the president touted the fact that more kids are graduating from high school and college than ever before. "We believed we could prepare our kids for a more competitive world," he said in Tuesday's State of the Union speech. "And today, our younger students have earned the highest math and reading scores on record."

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NPR Ed
4:50 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

What To Expect From Obama Tonight On Education

President Obama speaks at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tenn., on Jan. 9. Obama is promoting a plan to make publicly funded community college available to all students.
Mark Humphrey AP

On the education front, President Obama's State of the Union address is likely to focus on three big proposals:

First, the president wants to talk about the idea he floated last week of making community college tuition-free. This is new.

The plan would benefit about 9 million full- and part-time students and would cost the federal government about $60 billion over 10 years. According to the administration's numbers, that would account for three-fourths of the total cost. States and community colleges would come up with the rest.

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NPR Ed
12:41 pm
Mon January 19, 2015

Classroom Reflections On America's Race Relations

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., marches with other civil rights protesters during the 1963 March on Washington.
AP

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 10:25 am

In Peter Maginot's sixth-grade class, the teacher is white, but all of his students are black. They're young and they're honestly concerned that what happened to Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Eric Garner could happen to them.

"Who can tell me the facts that we know about Mike Brown?" Maginot asks the class at Shabazz Public School Academy, an afro-centric school in Lansing, Mich.

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