Environment

North Carolina is one of the country's largest poultry producers — and getting bigger. Large-scale chicken farms are spreading across the state. Government regulations have allowed these farms to get much closer to where people live. That's not just a nuisance. Neighbors say it's also a potential health hazard.

Craig Watts is an industrial chicken farmer in Fairmont, N.C. He contracts with Perdue and has raised birds for more than 20 years. Still, he says sometimes it's a struggle to meet the demands of the industry.

Despite State Efforts, Arsenic Continues to Poison Many Private Wells in Wisconsin

Jan 24, 2016
Bridgit Bowden / Wisconsin Public Radio

Special regulations to reduce exposure to the ancient poison have helped, but high-capacity wells can exacerbate the problem.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Editor's note: A version of this post first appeared in January 2015.

Many people will see the snow currently blanketing much of the U.S. Eastern Seaboard as a nuisance coating sidewalks and roads. Others are celebrating it as an excuse to spend the day swooshing down a hill.

As for me, I like to think of snow as food.

At $1.22 a gallon, a gas station on Columbus, Ohio's southwest side is drawing customers from all parts of the city. Stan Cartwright drove there from across town.

"I came for the gas price. I live on the East Side, and so, you know, I had to make a little bit of a commute, but it was worth it," he says.

The bargains aren't just in Columbus; drivers all around the state are saving money.

"Prices in Ohio tend to be very, very competitive," says GasBuddy.com petroleum analyst Patrick DeHaan.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

On the surface, Flint, Mich., and Kabwe, Zambia, don't seem to have a lot in common.

They're half a world away from each other. One is a city of 99,000 in one of the richest countries in the world. The other is a city of 203,000 in a lower-middle-income country.

From the way we speak to the things we do, few things spark cliches like the threat of a winter storm. For days now, we've been talking about Jack Frost's plans. And as people hunker down, staples like bread, milk and toilet paper have been flying off store shelves.

Many of us are already sick of hearing about the white stuff — and we haven't even felt the wrath of Ol' Man Winter yet. (Side note: What did we ever do to this man to make him so vengeful?)

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