Environment

Florida Sea Turtles Stage Amazing Comeback

Jul 13, 2015
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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In 2009, Rue Mapp was thinking about business school, weighing the pros and cons, and wondering if it was the right choice. The former Morgan Stanley analyst turned to her mentor for advice. But rather than give her an answer, her mentor asked a question: If you could be doing anything right now, what would it be?

Just like that, Mapp knew an MBA wasn't in her near future. Instead, she decided to combine everything she loved — from nature to community to technology — into an organization that would reconnect African-Americans to the outdoors.

"Extreme." "Unprecedented." "Historic." Those are just a few of the words being used to describe the start of this year's fire season in North America.

The wildfires are centered in the northwest of the continent, but their consequences are far-reaching. Thick smoke has blanketed parts of Wisconsin and North Dakota. It's triggered air alerts in Minnesota and Montana and muddied skies as far south as Tennessee and Colorado.

And, of course, things are even worse at the source.

Rural Tulare County, Calif., is now being called the epicenter of this drought.

That's because at least 1,300 residential wells have run dry, affecting at least 7,000 people. When your taps start spitting out air here, Paul Boyer and his team are who you call.

Under a punishing midafternoon sun, Boyer helps muscle down five of these hefty 400-pound water tanks from a semi-truck flatbed. He helps run a local nonprofit that's in charge of distributing these 2,500-gallon water tanks to drought victims.

S Bence

Potawatomi Hotel and Casino on Canal Street has played a central role Milwaukee’s Menomonee Valley revitalization.

Not only does it draw tourists eager to try their luck at slot machines or see a concert; Forest County Potawatomi is also making a name for itself in sustainability.

Its 381-room hotel achieved gold LEED certification. And all of Potawatomi’s food waste lands in a $20 million digester - just west of the complex - producing 2 megawatts of electricity.

P Murphy

Over the last few years, nearly 70 homeowners in Milwaukee neighborhoods have jumped on the renewable energy bandwagon and installed solar on their rooftops.

Their rooftops combined produced enough electricity to offset the burning of over 200,000 pounds of coal in a year’s time.

The City’s Milwaukee Shines program helps coordinate the neighborhood initiatives. It has targeted Riverwest, Bay View and most recently Layton Boulevard West and Washington Heights.

There's new evidence that wild bees, some of nature's most industrious pollinators of wildflowers and crops, are getting squeezed by our planet's changing climate.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Now we bring you the story of an investigation. Cue the "Magnum, P.I." music...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MAGNUM, P.I. THEME")

MCEVERS: ...Because yes, this involves the famously mustachioed star of the '80s series, Tom Selleck.

S Bence

In the spring of 2013, Milwaukee joined some 70 cities around the U.S. and Canada  that tout local “Edible” publications. They’re part of an “Edible Communities, Inc.” movement – grounded in a mission they describe as transforming the way people shop for, cook and eat local food.

Lake Effect’s Susan Bence sat down with Edible Milwaukee publisher and editor Jen Ede at a Walker’s Point café.

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