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Something about President Obama's latest move speaks to the ambition of a president in its final two years. The tallest mountain on this continent will bear a different name because of him, and it's a powerfully symbolic change.

It seems to be part of human nature to want to belong to a group. People constantly form groups, in all kinds of situations, and high-stakes negotiations on climate change are no exception.

Ever heard of the Umbrella Group? Or the Like-Minded Developing Countries? How about the Group of 77? (Here's a hint — it doesn't actually have 77 countries.)

The White House announced Sunday that President Obama is changing the name of North America's highest peak.

Mount McKinley — named after William McKinley, the 25th president, who served in the White House until his assassination in 1901 — is returning to its traditional Alaska Native name, Denali.

Obama will make a public announcement of the name change in Anchorage Monday, during a three-day visit to Alaska.

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BRENT MUSBURGER: If you see a little haze on your screen, folks, don't adjust your TV sets. The fires that have roared across the Western and the Northwestern part of the United States have poured smoke into western Montana.

On a rare sunny morning in the northern Pacific Ocean, biologist Douglas Causey takes to the sea to conduct his research — binoculars in one hand, and a shotgun in the other.

This has been one of the worst — and most expensive — wildfire seasons ever in the Northwest, where climate change and a history of suppressing wildfires have created a dangerous buildup of fuels.

With fires burning hotter and more intense, there are renewed calls to change how the federal government pays to fight the biggest fires.

"These large and intense fires are a natural disaster in much the same way a hurricane or a tornado or a flood is," U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says. "And they ought to be funded as such through the emergency funding of FEMA."

S Bence

If the term is new to your vocabulary – permaculture combines natural landscaping and edible gardening, with the aim of mimicking patterns and relationships found in nature.

Today through Sunday the 2015 Wisconsin Permaculture Convergence is underway on a small farm outside Fredonia, Wisconsin. Summer fruit tree grafting and the ins and outs of fermentation will be among a multitude of topics of discussion.

Bryce Ruddock is a human lexicon of all things permaculture.

M Maternowski

In 1996, USGS scientists embarked on a 24 hour inventory of a park in Washington D.C. Their aim was to identify every plant and animal species on the grounds, and the term BioBlitz was coined.

Ellen Censky, now Senior Vice President and Academic Dean of the Milwaukee Public Museum, participated in her first BioBlitz in 1997 in Pittsburgh, PA. When a job took her to the Univeristy of Connecticut she initiated a BioBlitz there. It received national attention.

Censky decided to write a handbook at the time “because I was getting calls from all over the country.”

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Hey, this next story is an attaboy to California. The state wants people to cut back water use in a drought. And in July, urban water use dropped 31 percent compared to last year. NPR's Nathan Rott reports.

More than 21,000 people are out of work this year from California's drought, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. The majority are in agriculture. Those farmworkers lucky enough to have a job are often working harder for less money.

Leaning forward and crouching from the waist, Anastacio picks strawberries from plants about as tall as his knees. We're not using his last name because Anastacio and his family are undocumented.