Environment

When utility companies burn coal to make electricity — and it generated 39 percent of U.S. energy in 2013 — it leaves behind ash that can contain arsenic, selenium, boron and many other toxic substances.

More than 70 years ago, the federal government took land from descendants of West African slaves, known as the Gullah, living in Georgia. Now they're fighting to get it back.

In 1942, they were given just weeks to leave marsh property on the Georgia coast so that the U.S. military could construct an air base for training pilots and conducting anti-submarine flights. Twenty years later, the former base and the land around it were converted into the 2,762-acre Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge.

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Currently, Milwaukee's inner harbor is not an inviting space. But change is brewing.

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Did you spend any time working in your yard over the weekend?  We’re in that great period of time right now when we can enjoy the warm weather without yet worrying about mowing the lawn.

But Lake Effect gardening contributor Melinda Myers says that doesn’t mean we should ignore our yard as the last piles of snow disappear.

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Northern Chile is home to some 7,000-year-old mummies, some of the oldest mummies in the world. But scientists say the mummies are in danger. NPR's Jasmine Garsd has this story about mummies, strange oozing substances and a mysterious fog.

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A panel in Milwaukee this week largely criticized the rule that would reduce Wisconsin's coal-burning power plant emissions 34 percent by 2030. Only one renewable energy advocate expressed support.

As the Obama administration opens the door to offshore drilling, the oil industry is promising more jobs and less reliance on foreign oil. Some people who live along the Eastern Seaboard are saying, "no thanks."

Coastal towns and cities in several states are formally opposing offshore drilling and oil exploration.

Tybee Island, Ga., is a short drive across the marsh from the historic city of Savannah. The island is dotted with hotels and tiny vacation cottages for tourists — and for about 3,000 people, it's home.

On a hillside on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, about 50 red-haired refugees are learning how to be orangutans once again. The country's booming palm oil industry has encroached on their habitats, leaving many of them homeless and orphaned.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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