Health & Science

Shots - Health News
4:39 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

'How Do You Tell Your Kids That You've Got Alzheimer's?'

When he was 59 years old, Greg O'Brien was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Five years later, he is speaking publicly about his experience, even as his symptoms worsen.
Courtesy of Greg O'Brien

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 4:36 pm

This is the first in a series, "Inside Alzheimer's," about the experience of being diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

In 2009, 59-year-old Greg O'Brien was a successful journalist and writer living in Cape Cod. He was healthy and happy — he exercised every day, made a good living, spent time with his three children and wife.

But he had also started to notice changes in himself. He was forgetting things, and his judgment sometimes seemed to fail him. Meanwhile, his own mother was dying of Alzheimer's disease.

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Around the Nation
4:02 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

Measles Outbreak Linked To Disneyland Hits Over 70 Cases

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 6:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Technology
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Facebook Aims To Weed Fakes From Your News Feed

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
6:59 am
Sat January 24, 2015

App Links Sex Assault Survivors To Help, But Who Downloads It?

The UASK app helps sexually assaulted college students in D.C. access a range of services, from rides to the hospital to phone numbers for counselors. The information is personalized to their school. Another version of the app, ASK, provides the same resources to non-students.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 6:48 am

Maya Weinstein is now a happy, bubbly junior at the George Washington University. But she says that two years ago, just a few weeks after she arrived on campus as a freshman, she was sexually assaulted by a fellow student.

"It was one of those 'acquaintance rape' things that people forget about, even though they are way more common," she says.

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The Salt
6:39 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Will Environmentalists Fall For Faux Fish Made From Plants?

Chef James Corwell's nigiri sushi rolls made with Tomato Sushi, a plant-based tuna alternative, in San Francisco.
Alastair Bland for NPR

It's a dead ringer for Ahi tuna sashimi. It cuts into glistening slivers that are firm and juicy. And it's got a savory bite.

But this flesh-like food is not fish. It's made of tomato, and it's what San Francisco chef James Corwell hopes could be one small step toward saving imperiled species of fish, like bluefin tuna.

"What I want is to create a great sushi experience without the tuna," Corwell tells The Salt.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
5:28 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

The Ethics Of The 'Singularity'

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:31 am

Some people argue that we will one day reach a point when our machines, which will have become smarter than us, will be able themselves to make machines that are smarter than them. Superintelligence — an intelligence far-outreaching what we are in a position even to imagine — will come on the scene. We will have attained what is known, in futurist circles, as the "singularity." The singularity is coming. So some people say.

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Health Care
4:24 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Study Finds Huge Disparities In Costs Of Common Surgeries

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 5:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:36 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Leaky Blood Vessels In The Brain May Lead To Alzheimer's

Leaks in a barrier between blood vessels and brain cells could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's.
VEM Science Source

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 6:49 am

Researchers appear to have found a new risk factor for Alzheimer's disease: leaky blood vessels.

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The Salt
3:10 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Brewers Gone Wild: Taming Unpredictable Yeast For Flavorful Beer

Allagash Brewing microbiologist and head of quality control Zach Bodah's favorite microscope picture of Brettanomyces (taken in house). The culture comes from Confluence Ale and is a blend of the Allagash house yeast and Brett yeast.
Courtesy of Zach Bodah/Allagash

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 9:38 am

Crack the vast menu at any self-respecting beer bar, and you're bound to run into a scientific name among the descriptions: Brettanomyces, affectionately known as Brett.

I've heard American brewers and beer geeks utter "Brett" in hushed, reverent tones before swooshing aromatic liquids made with it across their tongues. But this mysterious, mythic and increasingly popular strain of wild yeast also strikes fear in the hearts of brewers and microbiologists in the industry.

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Goats and Soda
2:36 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Taking Antibiotics During Travel Fosters Drug-Resistant Germs

An employee of the drug company Apotex, examines some Ciprofloxacin at the plant in Canada. Cipro is commonly given to travelers for diarrhea. More than 20 million Cipro doses are prescribed each year in the U.S.
Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 7:54 pm

Delhi belly. That's what my brother-in-law calls the rumble in his stomach he invariably gets on business trips to India.

Like many travelers, he pops a few Cipro when Dehli belly hits. That may stop the microbes causing the GI distress, but it also opens the door to another unwanted visitor: drug-resisted bacteria.

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