Health & Science

Scientists have discovered water that has been trapped in rock for more than a billion years. The water might contain microbes that evolved independently from the surface world, and it's a finding that gives new hope to the search for life on other planets.

The water samples came from holes drilled by gold miners near the small town of Timmins, Ontario, about 350 miles north of Toronto. Deep in the Canadian bedrock, miners drill holes and collect samples. Sometimes they hit pay dirt; sometimes they hit water, which seeps out from tiny crevices in the rock.

Richard Wheeler

Actress Angelina Jolie announced yesterday that she’s had a preventive double mastectomy after learning that she carries a genetic mutation that puts her at high risk for developing breast cancer.

That announcement has, for many, rekindled a dilemma about how much information we want to know about our genome, and what do with that information once it’s in hand. 

Photos.com

Does it seem a lot of people around you have suddenly come down with a sore throat or cough? The likely culprit is trees – tree pollen, to be specific.

White House photo via Wiki Commons

A provocative obituary ran in the New York Times on March 30, 2013. It began as follows: “She made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job and took eight years off from work to raise three children.”

AlphaTangoBravo, Adam Baker, via Flickr

When you’re the parent of a small child, there are certain milestones in the physical and mental development you tend to look out for.  But beyond the obvious one – things like walking and talking – are some more subtle markers of a child’s development.

Want to Fight Disease? Do Your Math Homework

May 9, 2013
Arizona State University

A common complaint among school kids who don't want to learn their math is that it's not important in the real world. While there is a lot of theory in math, a growing body of researchers are proving this notion wrong by applying math in some surprisingly relevant ways.

A Wisconsin Appeals Court has sided with the City of Milwaukee, when it comes to which entity sets health care costs for police and fire fighters - the municipality decides.

Gov. Walker's Act 10 ended nearly all public union rights in Wisconsin, except for police and fighters. However, lawmakers also extended a provision that prohibits first-responders from negotiating the design of their health insurance plans. The design includes such items as co-pays and deductibles.

Wisconsin is now observing daylight savings time. Residents of most states lost an hour of sleep when time “sprang forward” over the weekend.

In 10 months, the Affordable Care Act moves into full force.

Kenneth Munson, regional director of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, says starting in October, Wisconsin residents can enroll in the state’s health insurance exchange or marketplace. Gov. Walker opted not to create it, so the federal government is doing the job.

Peter Jakubwski, courtesy of UWM

Both public health and private campaign efforts have aimed at reducing the number of infant deaths in Milwaukee due to co-sleeping. But the problem hasn’t gone away – babies still die, and research by UW-Milwaukee nursing professor Jennifer Doering indicates at least a quarter of the women she studies are still co-sleeping with their infants.

WUWM has been reporting on the impact of gunshot injuries. Bullets wound hundreds of people in Milwaukee every year, and change their lives. Ann-Elise Henzl focuses on the youngest victims: the children shot.

Ann-Elise Henzl

This week, as national leaders consider ways to reduce gun violence, we’re reporting on the hundreds of people in Milwaukee living with gunshot injuries.

WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl talked to three men with spinal cord injuries, about how a bullet changed their lives.

Thanks to improvements in medical care, more victims recover from gunshot wounds, which once might have been fatal.

However, the growing survival rate does not tell the full story about victims’ experiences. Some face significant physical and emotional damage.

Ann-Elise Henzl

It seems several times each month, Milwaukee mourns people who have been shot to death.

Last year in the city, gunfire killed 72.

Argonne National Library

A lot has been written about the effort to attract more women and people of color to what's known as the "STEM" fields - science, technology, engineering, and math. Leaders in all of those fields have spoken of the need to have a future workforce that better reflects the demographics of this country. But where do we actually stand in attracting students to STEM education?

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