Health & Science

Updated at 3:49 p.m. ET

As the solar eclipse made its way from the West Coast to the East Coast, NASA shared its expertise live.

Eclipse Map: Tracking The Astronomical Show

Aug 21, 2017

Updated at 3:47 p.m. ET

The United States was treated to a solar eclipse Monday, but where you were in the country affected whether you saw a total eclipse or a partial one. The map reflects the time zone you're in.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher/NASA

It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Eleven states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

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Seated at a kitchen table in a cramped apartment, Rosendo Gil asks the parents sitting across from him what they should do if their daughter catches a cold.

Blas Lopez, 29, and his fiancée, Lluvia Padilla, 28, are quick with the answer: Check her temperature and call the doctor if she has a fever they can't control.

"I'm very proud of both of you knowing what to do," Gil says, as 3-year-old Leilanie Lopez plays with a pretend kitchen nearby.

Daniel Begay, who is Navajo, had always been told growing up that traditional American Indian foods were good for him.

But because most American Indians are lactose intolerant, "they aren't getting that same source of calcium from dairy products," Begay says.

Turns out that it's a traditional cooking method that is key to his bone health. The Navajo burn juniper branches, collect the ash and stir it into traditional dishes. The most popular: blue corn mush.

By now you likely know an eclipse is happening Monday, Aug. 21. There have been countless stories about the celestial event, how to view it, the science behind it and hotels that were booked more than a year in advance. But even with all that coverage, you might not have heard details about a small town in deep Southern Illinois that is expected to almost triple in size just for the eclipse.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DWANE BROWN, HOST:

And finally, yesterday, we asked you to contribute to our solar eclipse soundtrack. Here's what you came up with.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THAT'S AMORE")

Words You'll Hear: Eclipse Cheap Seats

Aug 20, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DWANE BROWN, HOST:

On a recent weekday, Vamsi Komarala guides me up to the rooftop of the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology in New Delhi, where he teaches physics. Fields of solar panels adorn the buildings.

I swipe an index finger across one of the panels to see if weeks of monsoon rains have washed it clean. My finger comes back filthy with grit.

Vamsi tells me the panels are washed twice a week, then explains the grime: "That is because in New Delhi, we have a lot of dust."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

When children in Turkey head back to school this fall, something will be missing from their textbooks: any mention of evolution.

The Turkish government is phasing in what it calls a values-based curriculum. Critics accuse Turkey's president of pushing a more conservative, religious ideology — at the expense of young people's education.

At a playground in an upscale, secular area of Istanbul, parents and grandparents express concern over the new policy.

Last week, NPR had a story that garnered a huge response from listeners and Shots readers.

The day of the long-awaited coast-to-coast solar eclipse has arrived — and if history is any guide, it's likely that somebody's eyes are going to get hurt.

One of Tesla CEO Elon Musk's companies, the nonprofit start-up OpenAI, manufactures a device that last week was victorious in defeating some of the world's top gamers in an international video game (e-sport) tournament with a multi-million-dollar pot of prize money.

We're getting very good, it seems, at making machines that can outplay us at our favorite pastimes. Machines dominate Go, Jeopardy, Chess and — as of now — at least some video games.

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