Health & Science

For millions of Americans, climate change is making the weather nicer. That's the conclusion of a new study that points out winters are getting quite a bit milder, while summers aren't getting that much worse.

The study's authors say the mild temperatures might be one reason some people aren't so worried about climate change.

For most of the U.S., the hottest temperatures in July haven't gone up much — scientific consensus is about half a degree over the past 40 years. Same for sticky humidity — not much change, if any.

The European Union has filed new antitrust charges against Google, alleging that it uses its Android operating system to impose unfair conditions on makers of mobile devices.

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We found that Google pursues an overall strategy on mobile devices to protect and expand its dominant position in internet search," Margrethe Vestager, the EU's commissioner for competition, said in a statement today.

Updated April 20 at 1:50 ET with a statement from the American Hospital Association.

Bowing to pressure from the hospital industry and Congress, the Obama administration on Wednesday delayed releasing its new hospital quality rating measure just a day before its planned launch.

On Tuesday, the state of Utah officially declared a new public health crisis: pornography.

Gov. Gary Herbert signed a resolution stating that pornography is a "public health hazard" that harms both individuals and society.

The nonbinding resolution calls for research, education and policy changes "to address the pornography epidemic that is harming the citizens of Utah and the nation."

One of the chief goals of the Affordable Care Act was to expand insurance coverage so that all Americans could have access to quality health care. How's that working out?

White women are dying at a slightly younger age than in the past. That's according to a report released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

The National Institutes of Health has suspended work in two facilities that manufacture products given to people who are enrolled in research studies, saying the facilities haven't complied with safety standards designed to protect already-sick people from inappropriate risks.

Confused if you should "dip" or swipe your new chip card?

You might be haunted by the memory of the last time the machine balked when you inserted your chip credit card in the slot — and you suffered the impatient glares from that long line of people behind you.

It can take time for new technology to settle in. Chip cards, designed to curb fraud, have been in use in Europe and the rest of the world since 2002, but they're new to the United States.

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Insurance giant UnitedHealth Group says it will stop selling insurance on Obamacare exchanges in most states starting next year.

In a Tuesday call detailing UnitedHealth's first quarter earnings, CEO Stephen Hemsley said the company would "remain only in a handful of states," after losing money on the individual health plans it sold on state exchanges.

With the Zika virus spreading through Latin American and into U.S. territory, lots of researchers want to pursue projects to help fight the disease.

But there's one problem: money.

Or rather, getting money to researchers. President Obama has requested $1.9 billion from Congress to fight Zika, but this appeal is being held up by a vote in Congress. In the interim, the White House redirected $510 million from federal money left over from the response to Ebola.

U.S. lawmakers Tuesday once again brought Apple, the FBI, security experts and law enforcement officials to testify on the ongoing debate over encryption and the ability of investigators to access data on electronic devices.

If you're like most people in North America, you probably spend most of your time indoors. Leave home in the morning, drive to work, stay in your cube all day, head home again. Ninety percent of our lives are spent inside a built environment of some kind – ones that we share with millions of invisible microbes.

Scientists increasingly recognize that rooms and buildings have their own microbiomes, and that those microbial roommates may affect the health of human inhabitants. Those microbes vary depending on what city you're in, according to a study published Tuesday.

To show that the tainted water in Flint, Mich., is safe when filtered, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he will be drinking it for the next month when he's at home and at work.

During a visit to Flint on Monday, Snyder said he visited a family's home and drank filtered tap water, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Picture a dusty, nomadic herdsman around 5000 B.C., trudging with his mare somewhere in Central Asia, and pausing to quaff a refreshingly tart yogurt drink from his gourd. Fast-forward to the present day, and it seems all you need for your daily dose of friendly flora is to wander into the kitchen and pop a breakfast burrito in the microwave.

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