Politics & Government

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When the Electoral College casts 538 votes for president this month, 38 will come from the state of Texas. All 38 were expected to go to Donald Trump. But Art Sisneros, one of the electors, says he just can't do it.

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President-elect Trump held another post-election rally last night, this time in North Carolina, one of many states that fell his way on election night. NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea was there.

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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

If there’s one state issue that riles a lot of Wisconsin leaders these days, it’s transportation. Wisconsin could face a $1 billion shortfall in its next transportation budget. Should lawmakers scale back projects or find more money?

President-elect Donald Trump continued his "Thank You" victory tour on Tuesday, making a stop in North Carolina to tout his national security agenda and formally introduce his pick for Defense Secretary, retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis.

Speaking in Fayetteville, N.C., Trump called Mattis the "living embodiment of the Marine Corps motto" — Semper Fidelis.

Alex Jones has a following. His radio show is carried on more than 160 stations, and he has more than 1.8 million subscribers on YouTube.

And he claims to have the ear of the next president of the United States.

Jones is also one of the nation's leading promoters of conspiracy theories — some of which take on lives of their own. He has been a chief propagator of untrue and wild claims about a satanic sex trafficking ring run by one of Hillary Clinton's top advisers out of a pizzeria in Washington, D.C.

He was a flamboyant, alpha-male billionaire who said things no career politician ever would — someone who promised to use his business savvy to reform the system and bring back jobs. Voters believed that his great wealth insulated him from corruption, because he couldn't be bought.

But his administration was marked by criminal investigations and crony capitalism.

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The Department of Homeland Security issued a regulation Tuesday putting restrictions on the kinds of archaeological materials that can be imported from Egypt.

That may not sound like a big deal unless maybe you're a collector or a museum. There are lots of federal regulations taking effect every day, and in fact there's been an uptick as the Obama administration's time in office wanes.

Such an increase is troubling to Republicans, but gives hope to those who want new policies in place before a new administration moves into the White House.

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Michelle Maternowski

The recount of Wisconsin votes cast in the 2016 presidential election is continuing.  So far, the results that have been reported have shown little shift in the totals that yielded a margin of victory of around 22,000 votes for Republican Donald Trump.

And unless there is a major shift in the numbers to come, most of the storylines will remain true.  Among them - a seismic shift of votes in western Wisconsin along the Mississippi River.  It’s an area in which Barack Obama saw significant support in both of his election campaigns, but swung to Republican Donald Trump this year.

The U.S. stock market is up more than 3 percent since Election Day four weeks ago.

One person who hasn't benefited: President-elect Donald Trump.

In a call with reporters, transition spokesman Jason Miller says Trump sold all of his holdings in the stock market over the summer. The move could remove some, but not all, potential conflicts of interest as the billionaire businessman takes office as president.

Even before the sale, stocks accounted for a tiny fraction of Trump's personal fortune. Most of his money is in real estate.

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