Politics & Government

Political news

For the first time ever, Wisconsin voters will go to the polls today to decide which candidate will take of the governor in an recall election. Republican Incumbent Scott walker is only the third governor is U. S. history to face recall. Organizers launched the effort last winter after he pushed forward a bill to strip collective bargaining rights from most public workers. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports on how the Democratic contenders have been crisscrossing the state, each wanting their name opposite Walker’s on the June 5 ballot.

Across the country, the term “War on Women” had made its way into the lexicon. As proof of an alleged war, critics of recent legislation point to changes in women’s health care, including abortion protocol, as well as pay discrepancies between the genders. WUWM’s LaToya Dennis reports that Wisconsin has changed a few policies affecting women, with supporters claiming there is no concerted war, just changes that make sense.

There will likely be primary elections in recall races targeting Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch, and four GOP state senators.

The Republican Party of Wisconsin says it has lined up “fake” Democrats to run in primaries, against the real Democrats who hope to challenge the six Republican incumbents.

The fake Democrats, like genuine candidates, will need to obtain enough valid signatures to get on the ballot. The Republican party says it would not spend money on the fake Democrats’ campaigns.

The party says the move is meant to force primaries in the race, thus creating firm dates for upcoming recall elections.

It will soon be relatively easy to learn who signed the recall petitions against Gov. Scott Walker and four Republican state senators.

On Wednesday, two Tea Party groups plan to activate the searchable online database they’ve created.

President Obama
Michael Reynolds -Pool/Getty Images

President Obama spoke to a cheering crowd of Master Lock employees Wednesday. The president cited the central city company as an example of what he intends to promote – manufacturing growth in the U. S. As WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, Master Lock decided to bring 100 jobs back here from China.

Hundreds of people celebrated on the streets of downtown Madison Tuesday, as a truck full of petitions aimed at recalling Gov. Scott Walker pulled up to the Governmental Accountability Board office. Volunteers carried dozens of boxes into the building as organizers claimed they’ve collected more than one million signatures to force an election. The recall effort began last year in response to Walker’s push to end most collective bargaining rights for public unions. As WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, election officials now have their work cut out for them.

Members of a studio audience posed question to our Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval panel about what happened in 2011 and where we might go from here, Friday morning at the Pabst Theater.

We conclude our Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval live panel discussion with a look at what the future of Wisconsin should be.

We continue our live panel discussion of the legacy of the past year in Wisconsin politics, live from Cudahy's Irish Pub at the Pabst Theater.

All this week, as part of our Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval series, we’ve been trying to digest the events of the past year – from the budget repair bill to controversial legislation, to the ongoing recall efforts. Today, live from Cudahy's Irish Pub at the Pabst Theater, we speak with a panel of guests – including lawmakers and people affected by this turbulent 2011 in politics. We ask what the past year has meant and what their vision of the Wisconsin of the future might be.

Public Policy Forum Analyst Rob Henken talked to Bob Bach Friday, as part of our special Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval broadcast at Cudahy's Irish Pub, inside the Pabst Theater.

Henken discussed the direction he feels Wisconsin is headed in, after volatile year in state politics, which saw numerous changes in state law and policy.

As our Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval series concludes, Bob Bach talks to a variety of people about where they think the state is headed, after the sweeping and divisive political changes Republican Gov. Scott Walker promoted this year.

He spoke with Karen Royster of the left-leaning Institute for Wisconsin’s Future. She finds flaws in the GOP legislation.

Could State Government be Scaled Back Further?

Dec 16, 2011

WUWM concludes our week-long series, Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval Friday.

Bob Bach talks with a variety of guests about where they think Wisconsin is headed, based on big policy changes made by GOP leaders in 2011.

In the finale of our series, Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval, we are looking toward Wisconsin’s future -- in light of the sweeping and divisive political changes Republican Gov. Scott Walker ushered through in 2011.

Brett Healy, president of the conservative think tank the MacIver Institute, joined Bob Bach to offer his perspective.

It's a Wonderful Wisconsin?

Dec 15, 2011

Over the past week, our Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval series has explored what the impact of the past year’s contentious political happenings has had on Wisconsin. We’ve identified winners and losers of the political fight and explored what lies ahead for the Badger State.

But we have to wonder, did it all matter? So what, that the debates on collective bargaining, the role of unions, and the size of government made Wisconsin a national lightning rod? Would these conversations have happened eventually? What would Wisconsin look like if none of this had happened?

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