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President Trump's "zero tolerance" practice of 100 percent prosecution was modeled after an earlier get-tough policy on the Southwest border called Operation Streamline. It was supposed to streamline the process for punishing unauthorized immigrants and deter people from jumping the border.

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Colorado Congressman Mike Coffman was in that meeting with President Trump this evening. He's a Republican critical of the White House policy of separating families who try to cross the border unlawfully. Congressman Coffman, welcome to the program.

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Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET Wednesday

Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry.

On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy of separating families — and replacing it with a policy of detaining entire families together, including children, but ignoring legal time limits on the detention of minors.

Updated 3:30 p.m. ET

In opposition to the Trump administration's practice of separating immigrant families, at least five governors, including two Republicans, say they will not send their National Guard troops to the U.S.-Mexico border.

Harry How/Getty Images

Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown is accusing Milwaukee police officers of discriminating against him because he is black when they used a stun gun last winter during his arrest for a parking violation.

A lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday says officers could have simply issued a citation instead of "unlawfully discriminating against Mr. Brown on the basis of his race."  

Officers detained Brown at about 2 a.m. on Jan. 26 outside a Walgreens store on Milwaukee's south side.  He was apparently double parked in a disabled spot.

Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET

President Trump told House Republicans that he will support them "1,000 percent" in their efforts to pass immigration legislation later this week. Republicans left the wide-ranging talk in the Capitol in good spirits but still unsure if they have the votes to pass a bill.

Kansas cannot require people to prove their U.S. citizenship before they can vote, a federal judge says, ruling that the state's election law is unconstitutional. The judge sharply criticized Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who has based much of his political career on worries about voter fraud.

Updated at 6:29 p.m. ET

Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department's inspector general, returned to Capitol Hill on Tuesday to take questions from lawmakers hoping to put their spin on the report his office released last week.

The nearly 600-page report is a comprehensive look at the Justice Department's handling of its investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server in 2016.

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Two sounds from the debate over border enforcement. Both were heard yesterday afternoon.

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