Politics & Government

Political news

Business groups and labor unions sharply disagreed today over the potential impact of a proposed change to the federal rule governing overtime pay.

In coming months, the two sides will submit comments in writing to the Labor Department to try to shape the rule's final wording, but the verbal sparring already has begun.

Business leaders say hiking overtime pay would reduce hiring, while unions say the change would stimulate the economy by raising incomes for about 5 million Americans.

Before laying out the different reactions, we'll look at what happened today:

The State Department is set to release about 3,000 pages of emails from Hillary Clinton's time as secretary of state on Tuesday. The release is part of the State Department's schedule to release a bundle of Clinton emails every month through Jan. 29, 2016.

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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

California Gov. Jerry Brown has signed off on one of the strictest school vaccination laws in the country a day after the state Legislature gave the measure final approval.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, whose political career has taken almost as many turns as a roulette wheel at an Atlantic City casino, is running for president.

He made the announcement Tuesday at Livingston High School, which he attended and where he was class president. Declaring "America is tired of hand-wringing and indecisiveness and weakness" in the White House, Christie said he is ready "to fight for the people of the United States of America."

Supreme Court justices have been turning heads this month with their choice of words, as well as with their landmark rulings.

June decisions have given us Justice Elena Kagan's bountiful Spider-Man allusions, Chief Justice John Roberts' exclamation of "What chumps!" and Justice Antonin Scalia's exhortation to "Ask the nearest hippie."

Jeb Bush will release 33 years of tax returns later this afternoon, a Bush campaign aide confirms to NPR.

"This is more than any presidential candidate in the history of the United States," Bush spokeswoman Allie Brandenburger wrote in an email. "This display of transparency is consistent with the high level of disclosure he has practiced during his life in public office."

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