Politics & Government

Political news

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Outside an apartment building on Broad Street, along the county line in Philadelphia, birds outnumber the rush-hour traffic.

"It's nice and quiet compared to other neighborhoods which I lived in," said Tyrone Peake, 52.

In 1981, when he was just 18, Peake was arrested with a friend for trying to steal a car to take a girl home after a long weekend.

"No, we never got the car," Peake said. "We broke the ignition column and then the cops came."

littleny - Fotolia.com

Wisconsin might restrict the types of groceries people can buy with FoodShare benefits.

On Thursday, an Assembly committee will listen to people's comments on the proposed new rules for the program designed to help low income people purchase food. Critics question whether the changes would be legal, because 100 percent of the funding for FoodShare comes from the federal government.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders announced his run for president Wednesday night in an interview with The Associated Press.

Sanders is the longest-serving independent member of Congress in U.S. history and a self-described "Democratic Socialist." The 73-year-old is considered a long shot but if elected, he would be the oldest person and first Jewish person to serve as commander-in-chief.

Here are five things you should know:

He was active in the Civil Rights movement

Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is running for president, he said Wednesday night. He will be challenging Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination, and the self-described "Democratic Socialist" will keep the pressure on Clinton to move to the left.

Sanders has lamented for a long time what he thinks has been woefully missing from the national conversation.

Lethal injection was the grim subject before the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday. Specifically at issue: whether the drug combinations currently used to execute convicted murderers in some states are unconstitutionally cruel.

The issue comes to the court after three botched executions over the past year.

Pages