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Before they got down to debating the big issues Thursday night, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders wrangled over one big word: progressivism.

Which of them was the true progressive? Was Clinton a progressive at all?

Sanders has long billed himself as a progressive, also describing himself as a "democratic socialist." He has not been known for flirting with the term "moderate." But Clinton has at times willingly chosen the latter label.

The fifth debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders was their first appearance as a duet, and that helped to highlight some of their harmony – even as it heightened their crescendos of dissonance.

With Martin O'Malley having suspended his campaign earlier in the week, the two remaining rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination met in New Hampshire on Thursday night — on stage together for nearly two hours.

"I happen to respect the secretary very much; I hope it's mutual," said Sanders.

And Clinton reciprocated:

In a year where so many Republican voters are angry at Washington, it can be tough to have two former presidents in your family.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has struggled with that dynamic his entire campaign — sometimes embracing the Bush legacy, and sometimes holding it at arm's length. (The campaign logo is Jeb!, not Bush!)

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The fifth Democratic debate was the first mano-a-mano encounter of the campaign. It meant there was enough room for an extended argument over the word "progressive." The biggest clash came when Sanders accused Clinton of taking Wall Street money. Clinton fired back that it was time to end that "artful smear." Sanders again turned talk of foreign policy to questioning Clinton's "judgment" on the Iraq War. Clinton replied: "A vote in 2002 is not a plan to defeat ISIS." Sanders refused to politicize the email issue.

The fight over the definition of "progressive" dominated the first half of Thursday's debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders on MSNBC, the first head-to-head debate between the two. It came just days before the crucial New Hampshire primary.

Here are seven moments that stood out:

1. "A progressive is someone who makes progress."

The debate focused on a central question about what it means to be a Democrat in 2016.

"A progressive is someone who makes progress," Clinton said.

Last night, just before the 9:00 deadline to enter the Baltimore mayoral race closed, DeRay Mckesson submitted his documents. In a last-minute surprise move, the Black Lives Matter activist who gained national attention during protests in Ferguson, Mo., made it official.

For Republicans who aren't named Ted Cruz or Donald Trump, the goal in New Hampshire's upcoming primary is to finish second — at best.

That's the best outcome the establishment Republican contenders can hope for following this week's Iowa caucuses, where Cruz and Trump topped the field in a tight three-way race with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

Since the Bill of Rights, there have been just 17 changes to the U.S. Constitution.

On Thursday, Tennessee's House of Representatives voted 59-31 to call for a constitutional convention, becoming the fifth state in recent months where lawmakers have called for a major rewrite of the Constitution.

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