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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Divided States: Florida Voters Roundtable

Oct 20, 2016
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has been ruffling feathers lately by suggesting there could be massive fraud at the polls on Nov. 8. Local elections officials are among the many refuting Trump's allegations and insist every voters' ballot will count.

At a campaign stop in Green Bay, Wisconsin this week, Trump said: "They even want to try to rig the election at the polling booths. And believe me, there's a lot going on."

He repeated his claim of a 'rigged' election during Wednesday's debate:

The final presidential debate was fast-moving with candidates clashing. Trump made waves early with a racially loaded sentence on immigration. "We have some bad hombres here," he said. "And we're going to get them out." Trump defended Russia's Putin and Syria's Assad and suggested he may not accept the results of the election. Much like the first debate, Clinton was on the offense, attacking Trump on his treatment of women and his temperament. She contrasted their records: While she was in the Situation Room getting bin Laden, Trump, she said, was on Celebrity Apprentice.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was noncommittal when he was asked if he would accept the results of the November elections.

"I will keep you in suspense," Trump said during the final presidential debate. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton said she was "appalled" by his response.

Here's the clip:

During the final presidential debate, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump clashed over Russia.

Responding to a question about one of her speeches released by WikiLeaks, Clinton pivoted by saying Trump should disavow Russia. Trump responded by saying it would not be a bad thing if Russia and the United States got along and that Russian President Vladimir Putin has no respect for Clinton.

"That's because he'd rather have a puppet as president," Clinton replied, sparking one of the fiercest confrontations during the debate thus far.

Here's the clip:

Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton debated Wednesday night in Las Vegas — the final time before the November election.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors across the newsroom, live-annotated the debate. Portions of the debate transcript with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact checks below.

Find more coverage at nprpolitics.org.

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was overall more cordial and more policy-focused than their nasty second debate faceoff. But the stunning moment that will stand out is the GOP nominee's statement that he won't necessarily accept the results of the election on Nov. 8.

"I will tell you at the time," Trump said in a shocking statement that signals a break from the traditional transfer of power. "I will keep you in suspense."

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

The debate will be split up into six 15-minute segments. Each segment will be dedicated to a topic selected by moderator Chris Wallace of FOX News.

Wallace selected these topics for the debate: debt and entitlements, immigration, economy, supreme court, foreign hot spots and fitness to be president. These may change, depending on news developments.

As Donald Trump warns about the prospect of a "rigged" presidential election, he's getting some help from a conservative activist group.

Project Veritas, which has carried out several damaging video sting operations, has posted several videos in recent days purporting to show Democratic operatives bragging about inciting violence at Trump's campaign events, and appearing to detail how they could bus out-of-state supporters in to commit voter fraud.

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