Politics & Government

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The shaky peace between Donald Trump and Fox News is in tatters, after the Republican presidential candidate blasted Fox's Megyn Kelly during her show Monday night. On Tuesday, Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes said Trump should apologize for remarks he called "crude" and "unacceptable."

"I liked The Kelly File much better without @megynkelly," Trump said in one tweet. "Perhaps she could take another eleven day unscheduled vacation!"

The CEO of Wisconsin's besieged job creation agency plans to retire from his position on Sept. 25. Reed Hall says he originally accepted the job for a three-month interim period and now, three years later, it's time to resume his retirement.

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation has been plagued by reports critical of its performance. Criticisms include that it failed to track delinquent loans and lacked documentation to justify many of its decisions.

Death row inmate Bernardo Tecero is scheduled to be executed Wednesday, making him 11th person to be put to death in the state this year.

Tecero, a Nicaraguan national, is condemned for murder of a school teacher during an armed robbery of a Houston dry cleaning establishment in 1997. A Texas jury convicted him in 2000.

There is no dispute Tecero is the killer. At issue, however, is whether or not he should be executed.

The decision clock is ticking for Vice President Biden to decide about a presidential run — and history hasn't been kind to past candidates who waited until the last minute.

Recent campaigns are littered with would-be front-runners who tried to wait it out and seize late momentum. Instead, they ended up as has-beens.

In the 2004 election cycle, Gen. Wesley Clark didn't enter the contest until September. He was leading the Democratic polls then, but rapidly fell once he became an official candidate.

When billionaire developer Donald Trump entered the presidential race two months ago, he drew a sharp line between other candidates — needy candidates, always trading favors for money — and himself.

"I'm really rich. I assure you of that," he said as supporters cheered. "And by the way, I'm not even saying that in a bragga — that's the kind of mindset, that's the kind of thinking, you need for this country."

M.P. King / Wisconsin State Journal

The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism outlined new procedures the state Dept. of Corrections may follow in deciding whether to hold an inmate in solitary confinement including the person's mental status and the severity of the infraction committed.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Justice Department is trying to make it easier for Native American tribes to gain access to national crime databases. Federal authorities say the program could prevent criminals from buying guns and help keep battered women and foster children safe.

The issue of who can see information in federal criminal databases might sound boring, until one considers a deadly shooting at a high school in Washington state last year.

This post was updated at 2:30 p.m. ET with comment from Sen. Menendez's spokesperson.

The Justice Department forcefully defended its prosecutors Monday against allegations of misconduct and perjury lodged by lawyers for Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., and an eye doctor who served as one of his longtime donors.

Stocks opened Monday with a swan dive: The Dow Jones industrial average plunged about 1,000 points, or 5 percent, in just minutes.

By midday, enough brave buyers had waded back in to push up prices — up to where losses were only around 1 percent or so.

But that didn't last. Around 3 p.m., the Dow dropped again, sliding nearly 700 points.

Stress-filled minutes ticked down until 4 p.m.: CLANG, CLANG, CLANG.

The closing bell rang. Brows were wiped, and commentators scrambled to explain why investors had seen both panic selling and panic buying.

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