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Martin O'Malley, former governor of Maryland, says he'll decide by late May whether he's running for president. Running would put him — even he seems to acknowledge — in an uphill battle against Hillary Clinton, currently the only Democrat who has declared.

O'Malley is positioning himself to Clinton's left, and even President Obama's left.

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat who is considering running for president in 2016, spoke with NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep.

O'Malley talked about why he feels Hillary Clinton — who would be his major competitor for the Democratic nomination if he decides to run — might have trouble connecting with young voters, Republican economic theory and why he opposes the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

For Republicans running for president — or eyeing it — this weekend was a big opportunity.

GOP presidential hopefuls from Marco Rubio to Ted Cruz to Carly Fiorina to Donald Trump descended on New Hampshire this weekend. The 19 candidates, and potential candidates, gathered in Nashua, N.H., for an event sponsored by the state Republican Party. They wooed activists and jockeyed for early position in the state that holds the first presidential primary.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

When Politicians Lose Their Accents

Apr 18, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker is one of the presidential hopefuls speaking at that GOP event. And the way Walker speaks has been getting some close scrutiny lately. Check out this clip from when he was running for governor of Wisconsin.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED SPEECH)

We are moving into the election season — feels like we're moving faster and faster, candidates are already in the early states — notably the newly announced Hillary Clinton. She headed right to Iowa for some close encounters with voters. Republicans, reportedly a score or so, are in New Hampshire this weekend, taking turns shaking hands with voters,

Hillary Clinton is inauthentic, not transparent and will have trouble connecting with younger voters. And Republican economic theory is "bull- - - -."

That was essentially the argument Martin O'Malley made in an interview with NPR for why voters should choose him to be president over Clinton — the overwhelming favorite for the 2016 Democratic nomination — as well as whichever candidate survives the Republican primaries.

Editor's Note: This is a reporter's notebook from NPR's Tamara Keith, who is covering the Hillary Clinton campaign.

The e-mail from the Clinton campaign came late on Monday. Meet at the Panera Bread in Davenport, Iowa, at 9:45 in the morning. I was to be one of about a dozen reporters in a press pool given access to an unpublicized stop. What we quickly learned was that the restaurant was a decoy. The unannounced meet-and-greet was happening at a small coffee shop 20 minutes away in Le Claire.

Earlier this week, members of Congress and their staffs were greeted by a makeshift golf expo set up in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The event included golf shot simulators, certified golf instructors and a putting challenge between Democrats and Republicans. It was all part of National Golf Day, an annual event organized by the industry that promotes the economic and health benefits of the sport.

A federal appeals court in New Orleans heard oral arguments in a case that could determine the viability of President Obama's plan to temporarily shield more than 4 million undocumented immigrants from deportation and issue them work permits.

At stake is whether the president will get to implement his plan before his term expires.

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