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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hundreds marched 6 miles through the heart of the nation's birthplace on Tuesday in the first high-profile street protest for more police accountability during the Democratic National Convention.

Organized by activists from the Black Lives Matter movement and other groups with the Philly Coalition for R.E.A.L. Justice, the hours-long demonstration started in North Philadelphia, a historically black neighborhood sprinkled with vacant lots and boarded-up buildings that had been left out of the convention's spotlight.

Hundreds of Bernie Sanders supporters walked out of the Democratic National Convention in protest Tuesday, after the roll call vote of state delegates was completed with Hillary Clinton officially receiving her party's presidential nomination. The walkout came after the Vermont senator moved to nominate Clinton through acclamation, basically turning his delegates over to her.

It's no secret actress Susan Sarandon is not a fan of Hillary Clinton. The vocal Bernie Sanders supporter said earlier this summer that "in a way she's more dangerous" than Donald Trump, especially when it comes to military intervention.

As the Democratic National Convention opened Monday night, a large contingent of Sanders supporters disrupted the night's program with boos and jeers, especially when Clinton's name was spoken.

Sarandon's disdain was clearly visible on her face during the convention, as seen in this GIF that went viral Monday night:

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

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