Politics & Government

Political news

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Let's continue this conversation with our Friday commentators. We have E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution. Welcome to you.

E J DIONNE, BYLINE: Good to be with you.

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Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

The U.S. Justice Dept. sent letters on Friday to nine jurisdictions, giving them until June 30 to prove they are cooperating with federal authorities in enforcing immigration law - or risk losing a big pot of federal funding. That grant money has been earmarked for law enforcement.

Other communities that received the letter include Chicago, New York and New Orleans.

When U.S. intelligence agencies spy on Americans, they're supposed to get a warrant. But what happens when they're spying on a foreigner and an American calls up?

The way intelligence agencies handle what they call this "incidental" collection of information — and what political leaders eventually do with it — will be a big part of the next phase in Congress' investigations about the Russian interference in last year's presidential election.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET.

The U.S. Justice Department has escalated its approach to so-called sanctuary cities, writing at least eight jurisdictions Friday to put them on notice they could be failing to cooperate with immigration authorities.

Alan Hanson, the acting assistant attorney general for the Justice Department's grant-making arm, warned the cities that they're required to submit proof that they comply with federal immigration law.

A remark U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions made earlier this week about a judge in Hawaii isn't sitting well with the Aloha State.

In an interview on the The Mark Levin Show, Sessions was asked about the status of President Trump's executive order on travel.

RICHARD HURD, FLICKR

Fifty-four retired Wisconsin judges wanted the state's high court court to prohibit judges from hearing a case, if it involved their largest campaign contributors. The threshold would have ranged from $500 for a municipal judge to $10,000 for a Supreme Court justice. But on Thursday, the court majority rejected the retirees' petition, insisting such rules would violate the constitution and voters' decisions.

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And I'm David Greene with a guide to this day's news. And, Steve, let's start in Paris where people yet again are dealing with the specter of terrorism.

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Sen. Bernie Sanders is campaigning for Omaha, Neb., mayoral candidate Heath Mello Thursday night, and he's not apologizing for it.

"Absolutely, and I want him to win," Sanders, I-Vt., told NPR Thursday, after a rally in Grand Prairie, Texas.

The Thursday event with Mello, a Nebraska state senator who's running as a Democrat in the mayoral race, is one of several rallies Sanders is holding across the country this week. It's part of a Democratic National Committee-organized unity tour with DNC Chair Tom Perez.

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