Politics & Government

Political news

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President Trump was out of sight today, huddling with his national security team at Camp David. On the agenda - a much delayed decision on a plan for America's longest war. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly reports.

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Heavily armed militia members and white nationalists listing the crimes of the federal government on camera. That's what happened in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend. And it's also what happened 25 years ago at Ruby Ridge.

Friday News Roundup - International

Aug 18, 2017

Last weekend’s violence in Charlottesville may have grown from American history but it’s international news.

Around the world, leaders are criticizing President Trump’s reaction to the events. Even Ayatollah Khameni spoke up.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Aug 18, 2017

A single story dominated the news cycle this week: a tragedy that took the life of a young woman in Charlottesville, Virginia and the president’s controversial responses to the event that led to her death.

The White House, white supremacy and where President Trump’s agenda goes from here.

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Geoff Bennett, White House reporter, NPR

Updated at 7:40 pm ET

Steve Bannon has lost his job as chief White House strategist.

The White House described the departure as a mutual agreement between Bannon and chief of staff John Kelly.

"We are grateful for his service and wish him the best," said press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET

Susan Bro, the mother of Charlottesville victim Heather Heyer, says she will not speak to President Trump because of his comments that suggested white supremacists and people protesting against them were both to blame for last weekend's violence in Virginia.

Trump's Week Of Controversy

Aug 18, 2017

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Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona, was an early supporter of President Trump and often praises him. But he says he has not heard directly from Trump since the president said he was seriously considering pardoning Arpaio on a recent conviction for criminal contempt of court.

Athlete Activism, After Charlottesville

Aug 18, 2017

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Many famous athletes have condemned the white supremacist march in Charlottesville. Some, like LeBron James, speak out often on race and social justice issues. But Marcus Thompson, a sportswriter for The Athletic, says there have been new voices speaking up this week.

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Two more terrorist attacks taking place in Europe where vehicles were used as weapons.

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A member of Congress who's one of the staunchest defenders of Russia in American politics met with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in London on Wednesday.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., spent around three hours with Assange talking at the Ecuadorean Embassy there, where Assange sought refuge in 2012 in the face of sexual assault charges in Sweden.

The recent violence in Charlottesville, Va., amplified an ongoing struggle in America about who experiences discrimination and to what extent. Many of the white nationalists who rallied in Charlottesville, for example, feel that white people are discriminated against as much as, or more than, minority groups.

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Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle made emotional pleas in Madison on Thursday, urging colleagues to pass – or reject – the Foxconn bill. After seven hours of debate, the state Assembly approved the bill on a vote of 59-30.

The vote was largely along party lines, but some Democrats found themselves supporting the bill.

As we struggled this week to make sense of what happened in Charlottesville, Va., some big questions bubbled up:

What lessons does history teach about white resentment in the United States? How is the experience of other countries and other times — like Germany — relevant? How are those in power reacting to President Trump's shifting response?

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