Politics & Government

Political news

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The United States often chastises African countries about elections that are less than free and fair — occasionally slapping on sanctions and other punitive measures. But with Donald Trump claiming the U.S. vote could be rigged, Africans are taking to social media to turn the tables.

President Obama had some harsh words for Donald Trump's charges that the presidential election is going to be rigged — "Stop whining."

On Election Day this November, about 1 in 4 Americans will vote using a device that never lets the voter see a copy of his or her vote on paper.

Let's make one thing clear: Three weeks out from this election, Hillary Clinton is winning — and it's not close.

Yes, people still have to vote, but if Democratic groups come out — and the Trump scorched-earth campaign is more like a white flag than an actual strategy — Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States unless something drastic changes between now and Election Day.

The month of October has been about as bad as could be for Trump. Let's recap. There was:

- The leaked audio of Trump's comments bragging about kissing and groping women,

Well, maybe.

Democrats have fantasized about turning Texas blue for a long time. And Hillary Clinton sees a slight opportunity to do that.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump is warning that the election will be rigged. He has precisely zero evidence to back up that claim. But he has a remarkably receptive audience.

Around 30 percent of Americans have "little or no confidence" that votes will be counted accurately — and Trump's voters are far less confident about that than Clinton's.

Traditionally, candidates do not complain about an election being rigged until they have actually lost. But 2016 is not a traditional year, and Donald Trump is no traditional candidate.

Allegations of media conspiracy, partisan collusion and Election Day shenanigans have become a staple of Trump's rally speeches and Twitter blasts. In his widely quoted tweet on Sunday, he was characteristically blunt: "The election is absolutely being rigged by the dishonest and distorted media pushing Crooked Hillary — but also at many polling places — SAD."

This election has been particularly noisy.

But when all the Twitter storms and heated exchanges (maybe) fade away after Nov. 8, the issues that affect real voters will remain.

With that in mind, we set out to create a cheat sheet on where each candidate stands on the issues voters care about most. The issues we chose to highlight come from the top 10 issues voters said were "very important" to their vote, according to a 2016 poll from the Pew Research Center.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Thousands of people turned out to see Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in Green Bay Monday night. Trump vowed to win Wisconsin in November and reiterated familiar promises to build a wall at the Mexican border and renegotiate trade deals. But, Trump also rolled out something new - a package of ethics reforms that he says are designed to end government corruption.

Trump took the stage to chants of “USA” and “lock her up” in reference to his opponent, Democrat Hillary Clinton. Trump bashed Clinton for her ethics, after WikiLeaks revealed a slew of hacked emails.