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The State Department released some 7,000 pages of Hillary Clinton's emails Monday from her time as secretary of state. This batch is the latest in a series of monthly, court-ordered releases that started in May. This is the largest batch so far.

An early scan reveals little new information — a lot of logistics planning, tech issues and news articles sent around. One email appears to suggest some confusion at the State Department help desk about Clinton's actual email address.

The latest batch of Hillary Clinton's emails from her time as secretary of state contains 125 the government now considers "confidential," the State Department said.

"We stand by our contention that the information we've upgraded was not marked 'classified' at the time the emails were sent," State Department spokesman Mark Toner said Monday in a press briefing.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

India has been practicing a form of affirmative action since independence nearly seven decades ago.

The country has quotas that allow "reservations" for government jobs and college slots for members of the most disadvantaged castes.

But a backlash against such caste quotas in the state of Gujarat, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's home turf, provoked riots last week and fears that the upheaval may be just beginning.

Dr. David Burkons graduated from medical school and began practicing obstetrics and gynecology in 1973, the same year the Supreme Court issued its landmark abortion decision in Roe v. Wade.

Burkons liked delivering babies. But he is also committed to serving all his patients, including those who choose abortions.

A longtime federal judge struggled Monday over what constitutes justice for members of one of Washington, D.C.'s most notorious drug rings.

Senior U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth pressed a public defender about the fate of Melvin Butler, a man who helped flood the city with cocaine that contributed to waves of violence in the late 1980s.

"You're saying that I can't consider the fact that he was one of the biggest drug dealers in the history of our city?" the judge asked. "Congress has tied my hands and I can't consider that?"

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