Politics & Government

Political news

After last week's mass shooting that killed 49 people at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, politicians of all stripes have been speaking out about the LGBTQ community — arguing what should be done to protect them, speaking to the importance of their safe spaces, and pledging commitment to their needs. Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, per usual, seems to have made the most waves with his words.

The documents released in the lawsuit against Trump University paint an unflattering picture. And as NPR has reported, the political repercussions could be hugely damaging for the Trump campaign.

Who would expect a Donald Trump Republican convention to be conventional, right?

Modern conventions have been staid affairs — except for the sometimes rogue empty chair. But Trump is considering ways to upend all that, campaign sources confirm to NPR.

Editor's note: This post contains language and photos some readers may find inappropriate.

I've covered presidential campaigns for decades. I've never had to bleep — or drop an asterisk into — a candidate's speech.

Until this year.

Take this Donald Trump quote from a rally in Virginia:

"We're gonna win with the military. We're gonna knock the s*** out of ISIS. We're gonna knock the s*** out of them."

The latest superPAC attack ad against Donald Trump checks all of the boxes when it comes to campaign tropes. There's stock footage, an ominous soundtrack, "real" Americans.

The richest Americans take heavy advantage of the tax code's many deductions. So Rep. Gwen Moore has an idea: She wants rich Americans to get drug-tested before they can get those tax benefits.

The Wisconsin Democrat is introducing the "Top 1% Accountability Act of 2016." Its goal: require "drug testing for all tax filers claiming itemized deductions in any year over $150,000," her office said in a press release.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Three-year-old allegations of political influence at the Internal Revenue Service are being revived as two House committees move toward punishing the IRS commissioner, John Koskinen.

The House Oversight Committee this week voted on party lines to censure Koskinen. The House Judiciary Committee holds its second hearing next week on whether to impeach him.

"This all started with the IRS using its authorities to target certain conservative groups for their beliefs," Oversight Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, said in prepared testimony to the Judiciary panel.

The NPR Politics team is back for its weekly roundup of political news, and in this episode the team discusses the aftermath of the mass shooting in Orlando: Democratic and Republican responses to the shooting, why Donald Trump's upcoming meeting with NRA is a big deal, and the filibuster by Senate Democrats that wasn't exactly a real filibuster.

The team also answers some listener questions and talks about the things they cannot let go this week.

Heard on the podcast:

Sure, the U.S. economy has problems: income inequality, aging infrastructure and slowing entrepreneurship.

But cheer up, Americans. The latest figures on developed economies show the United States is in far better shape than other countries.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, an international group that tracks global growth, said Thursday that the United States is making one of the strongest comebacks in the developed world.

The Senate is set to vote on four gun control measures Monday evening — and none of them is expected to pass.

Getting these votes scheduled was the singular goal of a 15-hour talking marathon Senate Democrats mounted on the Senate floor Wednesday. But because the outcome of the votes is already a foregone conclusion, some senators are wondering out loud: "What's the point?"

"This is unfortunately about politics on Monday night, not about finding a solution that will work for our country," said Republican Bob Corker of Tennessee.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bernie Sanders said Thursday night that his major political task for the next five months is to "make sure that Donald Trump is defeated and defeated badly."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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