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The Republican effort to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, has led to a standoff in the Senate.

Senate Democrats on Monday night began using parliamentary maneuvers to slow Senate business as part of a coordinated protest against the GOP push to pass an Obamacare replacement bill. A small group of Republican senators has been working in private for weeks, shielding from public view the bill and the negotiations surrounding it.

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

So it seems that it's not only Democrats who have trouble keeping their digital information secure online. An extensive database of information about 198 million Americans collected by a contractor hired by Republican groups was obtained by a security researcher, who found it on an Amazon server, with not even a single password protecting it.

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As we just heard, Alaska Republican Lisa Murkowski is among those lawmakers with reservations about the direction of the Senate's health care bill. Alaska is a deeply red state, but many of its rural residents depend on Medicaid for health care.

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So…How's The Resistance?

Jun 19, 2017

After the inauguration of President Donald Trump, many Democrats adopted a new mantra: “Resist.” The word appeared on signs waved in massive marches in cities across the country, Greenpeace put it on a giant banner outside the White House, Congressional phone

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to take up an appeal over electoral districts in Wisconsin after a lower court ruled that the state's Republican-drawn map constitutes an "unconstitutional partisan gerrymander."

It's the first time in more than a decade that the nation's highest court will take up the issue of partisan gerrymandering, or drawing voting districts with the aim of strengthening one political party.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has decided to consider the issue of partisan redistricting that has arisen in Wisconsin. Republican legislators redrew the state's political boundaries in 2011, in a manner that Democrats argue put Democratic voters at a disadvantage. GOP lawmakers defend the maps, as does state Attorney General Brad Schimel. Oral arguments are expected to take place after the high court convenes in October.

President Trump did it again on Twitter late last week.

"I am being investigated for firing the FBI Director by the man who told me to fire the FBI Director! Witch Hunt," he tweeted Friday morning.

Once again, a Trump tweet set off a media frenzy, this time making everyone wonder whether he was indeed confirming that he was under investigation for obstruction of justice. (The White House later said the tweet was not confirmation that Trump has been informed that he is under investigation.)

Wisconsin's state Supreme Court race suddenly is heating up. Last week, conservative Justice Michael Gableman announced that he would not seek reelection next year.

A couple people had already thrown their hat into the ring. Others followed, after hearing Gableman's news.

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UpdateMilwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke reportedly will remain on the job in Milwaukee County. Earlier this spring, he announced that he would join the Trump administration as an assistant secretary in the Department of Homeland Security. 

Clarke had not been specific about the timing, but indicated that he would begin work in his new post in June.

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