Politics & Government

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A California bill that would allow students to opt out of mandatory school vaccinations only if they have a medical condition that justifies an exemption is one step closer to becoming law, though it still has a long way to go. The bill was introduced in the California Senate in response to a measles outbreak at Disneyland in late December that's now linked to almost 150 infections.

President Obama is in Jamaica on Thursday, meeting with Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller and more than a dozen other leaders from throughout the Caribbean. It's the first stop on a three-day tour that also includes a hemispheric summit meeting in Panama. Topping Thursday's agenda is a looming energy crunch in the Caribbean, and a chance for the U.S. to seize the initiative there from leftist leaders in Venezuela.

In Missouri, two political suicides have stunned the Republican Party. In February, state Auditor Tom Schweich, a leading candidate for the party's nomination for governor, shot himself. Then just last month, his press secretary, Spence Jackson, took his own life. The tragedies have sparked fresh scrutiny of Missouri's increasingly bruising political system.

Schweich launched his campaign for governor with a scathing broadside against the state's Republican Party establishment.

Wisconsin Supreme Court Chief Justice Shirley Abrahamson has filed a federal lawsuit to ensure she's not immediately removed from her leadership position. 

She's named all six other members of the court and some state officials as defendants.

Abrahamson sued Wednesday, a day after voters approved a constitutional amendment that allows justices to select the court's leader.  For the past 126 years, the position has gone to the most senior member of the court.

State Rep. Wendell Gilliard, D-S.C., discusses the fatal shooting of Walter Scott by a police officer in North Charleston, S.C., after Scott was stopped after a traffic stop. Gilliard also explains his proposed legislation, which would mandate that police officers wear body cameras while on duty.

This story was updated April 9 at 4 p.m. ET.

As Hillary Clinton is expected to officially launch her presidential campaign in the next couple of weeks, her famous, former president husband talked to Town & Country magazine, which went along with him to Haiti in February.

Here are four takeaways from that interview:

1. The Clinton Foundation is not going away — even if Hillary Clinton wins.

Ron Paul stood off to the side Tuesday as his son Rand announced he was running for president.

There was no speaking role for the elder Paul, 79. There was no ceremonial passing of the torch of "liberty."

There wasn't even a hearty thank you or nod to the father's raucous presidential campaigns that laid the groundwork for the son's launch.

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