Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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Milwaukee Public Library

This week's Bubbler Talk inquiry comes from listener Brad Lichtenstein: "Besides the lakefront, what else did Socialist mayors do for Milwaukee?"

DESTINA, FOTOLIA

A new survey shows 42 percent of registered voters in Wisconsin plan to vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton in the presidential race, while 35 percent plan to back GOP candidate Donald Trump. Seventeen percent say they won't support either candidate. Clinton's seven-point lead is smaller than the 10-point advantage she had in the previous poll, conducted in March.

Ann-Elise Henzl | Milwaukee Public Radio

We are joining NPR this week in a special reporting project, called A Nation Engaged. It's exploring whether Americans believe their vote counts. WUWM talks to brand new U.S. citizens who'll be able to vote for the first time in this fall's presidential election.

Thailand native Xou Chang was one of about 100 people from nearly 40 countries who became a citizen at an outdoor naturalization ceremony on Tuesday in Milwaukee.

Government Accountability Board

On Thursday, the state Government Accountability Board will convene its last scheduled meeting. The Republican-led Legislature voted to eliminate the agency, which oversees elections and ethics. Lawmakers will replace it with two entities, and appoint the people who oversee them. Stakeholders are pondering the role politics may play as the GAB disbands.

Photo courtesy of The Racine Journal Times

A state of emergency exists in Racine County for about a dozen homes along the lakefront. The eroding lake bluff is threatening to pull down the houses. 

Emergency officials will meet with residents Tuesday evening to talk about possible solutions.

Roger Tietz is in the business of preventing lake bluff erosion. He works for Edward E. Gillen Marine, a Mequon company that installs shore protection. Tietz says this year a lot of areas without protection are vulnerable.

Milwaukee is wrestling with the crime of carjacking. It seems there are regularly stories in the news about people forced at gunpoint to give up their vehicles. Sometimes those crimes have deadly outcomes, as perpetrators speed away and crash.

On Thursday, members of the Common Council plan to discuss action they could take to reduce carjacking and high-speed chases. Meanwhile, some people concerned about the crime are urging drivers to take precautions. AAA is among them.

: Wisconsin Veterans Museum

For decades, the Wisconsin Veterans Museum has been collecting the personal stories of people who've served in the military. They reflect on their time in uniform, the impact of their service, and their thoughts about it today.     

Some of the reflections the veterans share are intense, especially those recalling fallen soldiers. Other stories are mundane at first, before becoming dramatic.

UW System

Gov. Scott Walker came under fire by UW System administrators and others last year, after his proposed biennial budget suggested altering the mission of the UW System.

For more than 100 years, the Wisconsin Idea has been in place. The mission, which is described in state statutes, says, in part, that the public university system must "extend knowledge and its application beyond the boundaries of its campuses." The statement also says that inherent in the UW System's mission is "public service designed to educate people and improve the human condition."

Ann-Elise Henzl

There's a new plan in Wisconsin to cut the growing cost of prescription drugs. The idea involves having the state analyze drug prices to determine whether they're reasonable.

State Rep. Deb Kolste says there's a simple reason Wisconsin should investigate medicine prices.

"Drug costs are rising at a much faster pace than wages, inflation and even the rest of health care," she says.

michaeljung, fotolia

Tens of thousands of graduates are either entering the workforce or searching for their place in it.

And if you're a new grad looking for a job, these may be some of the best words you'll hear this spring:

"There will be an increase that pretty much brings us back to the levels of employment for recent grads that occurred before the recession."

That's Jean Salzer, director of UWM's Career Planning & Resource Center. She’s talking about predictions from the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

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The Obama administration is changing overtime rules for some salaried workers. Employers across Wisconsin say they're preparing to feel the pain the changes will cause. Many still have questions about how they'll comply with the rules.

ALS Association Wisconsin Chapter

When all other treatments have failed for people who are terminally ill, some hope to try experimental drugs. However, federal law limits access to such treatments, in most cases, unless patients have been accepted into a clinical trial. One of Wisconsin's U.S. senators is trying to gut that restriction.

Sen. Ron Johnson wants terminally ill patients to be able to use experimental drugs when no other alternatives remain.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Milwaukee's old, abandoned structures can be an eyesore and a haven for criminal activity, and there is evidence that families sometimes live there.

Take the sprawling, former factory near 27th and Capitol.

"We know what's going on here but we can't do anything about it. All we can do is walk by and shake our heads," says longtime area resident Martha Freeman. She's seen the vacant structure deteriorate in the decade since its owners deserted it.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A number of people celebrated Earth Day over the weekend, perhaps renewing their commitment to eco-friendly habits. There's one practice that might not be on everyone's radar: finding new life for old textiles, from clothing to household décor.

Bob Woycke recycles textiles for a living.

"As a kid, I was living on 12th and Becher. I remember the ragman coming through with the horse and cart in the alley. Little did I know, I'd end up in that business," Woycke says.

Alderman Ashanti Hamilton / Facebook

Milwaukee's City Hall has a few fresh faces. Three new Common Council members took the oath of office Tuesday, beginning four-year terms. Members unanimously chose a new president, Ashanti Hamilton, who represents the city's far north side.

Hamilton succeeds Ald. Michael Murphy, who held the leadership post for two years.

Council members say they're embarking on a new beginning. Yet they're facing some old challenges.

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