Ann-Elise Henzl

News Director

Ann-Elise Henzl became News Director in September 2017.

Prior to her appointment, she worked in the WUWM Newsroom for more than 20 years. She served in a number of roles, including executive producer of the award-winning Project Milwaukee series, substitute news anchor for Morning Edition, and general assignment reporter.

Ann-Elise has been recognized for her work on numerous occasions, such as when she and a colleague shared the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio Television Digital News Association (for best use of sound in a story).

Ann-Elise has English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee, and attended Marquette University for two years.

When she's not at work, she often can be found at one of the area's dog parks, with her pal, Peabody.

» Contact WUWM News

Alex Wong / Getty Images

Updated at 4:47 p.m. CT

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden began a visit to Wisconsin on Thursday by meeting with the family of Jacob Blake, the Black man whose shooting by a white police officer sparked days of sometimes violent protests.

This was Biden’s first trip to Wisconsin this campaign cycle.

He spoke with Blake on the phone for 15 minutes during his visit. Biden says Blake “talked about how nothing was going to defeat him, about how whether he walked again or not, he was not going to give up.”

Getty Images

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett says COVID-19 remains a threat, but there have been enough improvements in testing, tracing and other benchmarks to advance the city to Phase 3 of its Moving Milwaukee Forward Safely Plan. That means a number of Milwaukee businesses can expand their operations beginning Friday.

As of 2 p.m. Friday, bars and restaurants will be allowed to open their doors for indoor seating for the first time since mid-March. The number of customers must not exceed 25% of each restaurant’s capacity.

Emily Files / WUWM

Protests are happening around the country following the May 25 death of George Floyd, a black man who died when a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck. In Milwaukee, protests have been occurring since last Friday over Floyd's death and other cases of police brutality. Here you'll find updates on protests happening in the Milwaukee area.

Courtesy of Samer Ghani

Protests are happening around the country following the May 25 death of George Floyd, a black man who died when a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck. Here you'll find updates on protests happening in the Milwaukee area.

Check out all of WUWM's protest coverage here:

The Milwaukee Police Department is investigating a multiple shooting in a home in the 2800 block of N. 12th St., on the city’s north side.

In a brief news conference early Monday afternoon, Police Chief Alfonso Morales said the bodies of five people, ranging in age from 14 to 41, were discovered in the home after someone called police around 10:30 a.m. on Monday to report that the person’s family was dead.

Teran Powell

It was a very unusual spring election and presidential primary in Wisconsin on Tuesday. It happened in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic and due to a court order, results won't be made public until April 13.

Chuck Quirmbach

For more up-to-date information, read our March 18 post.

Updated Tuesday at 1:31 p.m. CT 

Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images

Updated Friday at 2:37 p.m. CT

Milwaukee learned more late Thursday afternoon about the fatal shootings Wednesday on the campus of Molson Coors — still thought of by many as Miller Valley. Milwaukee police released the names of victims and the suspect, who’s believed to have killed the five men before turning the gun on himself.

A hushed battalion of journalists waited inside the Milwaukee Police Department Administration Building on West State Street for the update.

OZAUKEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY/THE KUBALA WASHATKO ARCHITECTS

Wisconsin has a nickname. You've seen it on license plates: America's Dairyland. And in Milwaukee, you may have heard this moniker: Cream City.

It intrigues Bubbler Talk listener Anne Bromfield, who asked: "Why was Milwaukee once referred to as Cream City?" The answer might surprise you. It has nothing to do with the dairy industry.

ALTHOUSE

A couple of Wisconsin politicians weighed in on President Donald Trump’s administration last week, taking starkly different stances on the Republican president’s performance.

Democratic Gov. Tony Evers blasted Trump over immigration policy, while GOP Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner defended Trump on the Mueller investigation.

ALTHOUSE

After a months-long, bruising fight over the state budget, Gov. Tony Evers signed the document last week.

Republicans who control the Legislature are declaring victory because of the mark they put on the Democratic governor’s spending plan. They stripped his major policy proposals and made other big changes.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Pubilc Library

Like many cities, Milwaukee once was home to a number of "movie palaces" — places where the surroundings were nearly as much of a draw as what was playing on the screen.

These were single-screen, sometimes luxurious venues built in the early days of cinema well before the proliferation of TVs and suburban multiplexes. They had special features like air conditioning and newsreels.

Bubbler Talk received a question asking what happened to one of those theaters: the Grand, previously known as the Warner.

UBJSP / stock.adobe.com

State Republicans held their annual convention this past weekend in Oshkosh, WI. Party members and leaders used the event to look at what went wrong for the GOP in the fall of 2018 — and to better position the party for the 2020 elections.

While Republicans maintained the majority in the state Legislature in the fall elections, the party's candidates lost in all statewide races.

JR Ross of Wispolitics.com says presenters at the convention talked about how GOP candidates suffered last fall by drifting from the grassroots.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Public Library

Editor's note: This piece was originally published June 24, 2016. As thousands of delegates, reporters and other visitors prepare to descend on Milwaukee for the 2020 Democratic National Convention, many might be intrigued by the city's interesting political history. The piece includes portions of an interview with Anita Zeidler, who has since passed away.

EMILY HAMER/WISCONSIN CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers announced on Monday that the state's National Guard troops are returning home from Arizona. Evers issued an executive order, which says 112 Wisconsin National Guard personnel are currently performing border security duties.

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