Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has been ruffling feathers lately by suggesting there could be massive fraud at the polls on Nov. 8. Local elections officials are among the many refuting Trump's allegations and insist every voters' ballot will count.

At a campaign stop in Green Bay, Wisconsin this week, Trump said: "They even want to try to rig the election at the polling booths. And believe me, there's a lot going on."

He repeated his claim of a 'rigged' election during Wednesday's debate:

Military veterans have to tailor their resumes in order to clearly link their experience to the qualifications of the civilian job they're seeking. They also face another challenge: living without the routine and fellowship they had grown accustomed to in military life.

Randy Jackson of South Milwaukee served in the Navy in Desert Storm and left the military in 1993. He says it took him years to adjust to life as a civilian.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Many employers say they offer plenty of opportunities for new veterans just entering the civilian workforce. Yet some vets have to overcome hurdles as they begin their new careers.

When you hear glowing words like these about veterans, it seems like it should be a breeze for them to find jobs:

"They've had more experiences, they've been around the world, which certainly lends to the global environment that we have in our industry."

"They have the work ethic, the dependability, the maturity."

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin has been in Donald Trump's crosshairs this week. That's because Ryan said that although he'll vote for Trump, he’ll focus these remaining weeks leading up to November's election on keeping GOP control of the House, not on helping Trump campaign. Ryan made his comments after the video surfaced last week, showing Trump making lewd, predatory comments about women.

With the Trump-Ryan rift grabbing headlines, the media packed into a speech Ryan had scheduled in Brookfield on Thursday. But he had other issues on his agenda.

Gerardo Mora/Getty Images

The latest Marquette Law School Poll was released on Wednesday. It says Democrat Hillary Clinton has the support of 44 percent of likely voters. Republican Donald Trump, meanwhile, has the backing of 37 percent of likely voters.

Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate, had the backing of nine percent of likely voters, while Jill Stein of the Green Party captured three percent. Six percent of voters surveyed remain uncommitted.

The nation continues to watch developments in the race for president, stemming from Donald Trump's offensive comments about women caught on tape in 2005. The fallout has Wisconsin state lawmakers talking. They're pondering whether the controversy surrounding Trump will affect races for the Legislature here.

Wisconsin state Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald has backed fellow Republican Trump for months. At a luncheon on Tuesday, he was asked about Trump's boasts that as a celebrity, he could freely kiss and grope women.

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This election year, WUWM and other public radio stations have collaborated with NPR on A Nation Engaged. The project has probed voters on how they feel about a variety of issues.

In our final installments this week, we ask Milwaukeeans what it means to them to be Americans, and what the next president could do to advance that vision. We collected these responses at a job fair for veterans in Milwaukee.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Wisconsin still isn’t sure how the presidential race will play out here. But the candidates or their surrogates continue coming to campaign. A couple rallies over the weekend didn’t turn out exactly as planned.

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Milwaukee leaders continue to grapple with how to reduce crime. A Common Council committee began a series of public meetings this week on a proposed public safety plan. It relies heavily on beefing up law enforcement and imposing tough sentences to the dismay of people who favor a different tack.

The NAACP and others want Milwaukee to learn from an approach police in some other cities take.


Milwaukee has a growing problem with prostitution. It appears to have gotten out of control on the near south side. That's according to residents who testified at the Common Council's Public Safety Committee meeting on Thursday.

Ald. Bob Donovan chairs the panel and represents part of the near south side. He says prostitution there is nothing new.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Some Milwaukee voters didn't wait to hear Monday night's debate, as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump attempted to woo voters. In-person absentee voting began Monday in downtown Milwaukee at the Zeidler Municipal Building. 

Business was brisk. We asked a number of voters what issues were important to them as they cast their ballots. Additional early voting sites on the north and south sides will open October 10.


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Mayor Tom Barrett says Talgo plans to refurbish rail cars for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority at Milwaukee's Century City.

READ: WUWM's Coverage on Century City

About six years ago, Talgo began manufacturing high-speed trains at its Century City facility, for the high-speed rail line that was set to travel through Wisconsin. But that work ended after the state broke its contract with the company in the wake of Scott Walker's first election as governor.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

A weekend brunch staple: the Bloody Mary. The vodka and tomato juice drink has become known for its garnishes, which tower over other cocktails. Garnishes in Milwaukee may include asparagus spears, jumbo shrimp, even a piece of brisket or a miniature hamburger.

Michelle Maternowski

Gov. Scott Walker is drawing sharp criticism for his plan to delay highway projects, including the Zoo Interchange in Milwaukee. In the past, the governor has hailed the interchange as key to state businesses that transport products throughout the region.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Update: Three Republican legislators are requesting an investigation into who leaked the secret John Doe documents to The Guardian. Assemblymen Robin Vos, Jim Steineke and John Nygren have sent a letter to Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel, asking him to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate, insisting the person responsible committed a crime.

(Original post follows)