Audrey Nowakowski

Lake Effect Coordinating Producer

Audrey is Lake Effect's Coordinating Producer. She edits interviews, posts web articles and aides the production of stories.

Audrey is a graduate of Cardinal Stritch University where she majored in Communication Arts and minored in History and English. She has worked with 91.7 WMSE producing public service announcements.

Monika Kørra, of Norway, was a student at Southern Methodist University in Texas a few years ago. She competed as an elite-level track athlete, but her life took a major turn when she was kidnapped leaving a party and brutally gang raped.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, 74% of rapes are never reported and 15 out of 16 rapists never go to jail. Fortunately in Kørra's case, all three men were found and arrested within a week of her attack.

Alberto G. / Flickr

Fall is the time of year when thousands of Wisconsin high schools will virtually lock themselves in a classroom on a Saturday morning and take one of two tests that have customarily helped or hindered the effort to get into college.

The ACT and the SAT have undergone some significant changes in recent years in an effort to be a more useful predictor of college success, but an increasing number of colleges and universities are becoming “test-optional” schools. These schools no longer require students to include test scores as part of their application process.

Michael Chamberlin, fotolia

School lunches take a lot of heat from all sides, especially the lunches that students buy at school. Kids complain about the taste, and nutrition advocates complain that they’re often not healthy enough.

But what about the lunches kids bring from home? Often in the shuffle of getting ready in the morning, nutrition gives way to expediency -  to the point that some schools have sent home notes with children, admonishing parents to pack them a healthier lunch.

Carl Wycoff / Flickr

The Milwaukee City Council paved the way yesterday for the Milwaukee Bucks to construct a new basketball arena.

Some in the community, such as Common Ground, had hoped the city would tie support for the arena to the Bucks’ support for other recreational facilities in the community.

Andy Manis / Getty Images

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker ended his campaign for President yesterday.  Walker had until recently polled at or near the top among GOP hopefuls, both nationally and in key states such as Iowa and New Hampshire, and had attracted international media attention.  But after some missteps and limited success in two Republican debates, Walker’s poll numbers had fallen to near zero in the last few days.


Yesterday, a report in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel profiled three Wisconsin veterans with a story that’s not often heard.  They’re transgender veterans, who each served and were discharged honorably.

Reporter Meg Jones' article explores how the military and the Department of Veterans Affairs are dealing with transgender service members.

The last two decades have been remarkable ones in the comeback of the Milwaukee River.  And while some of that comeback is in an environmental sense, right in the middle of the bigger picture of the river's comeback story was Gary Grunau.  Grunau spearheaded the redevelopment of Schlitz Park and the Riverwalk District.

Jeramey Jannene / Flickr

If you work or spend any time downtown, you know that much of the business district can be a little slower on weekends than during the work week. But this weekend, some buildings downtown and in many other parts of the Milwaukee area will be bustling with activity.

sixdays / Fotolia

Perhaps it’s an obvious point, but pregnancy is a taxing time on a woman’s body.  The cliché is that during those nine months, a woman is doing everything for two – eating, sleeping, and exercising.

And if you’re used to doing all of those things for one, understanding what’s best for you and your baby can be a daunting task.  Megan Shemanske, a local fitness team leader and pre/post-natal fitness certified by the American Council of Exercise,  stresses that the old cliché is not exactly true.

ILO in Asia and the Pacific / Flickr

Global poverty is an enormous challenge – both in developing countries, and even in an economic powerhouse like the United States, where millions try to get by on subsidence wages. And whether you’re talking about India or Milwaukee, the plight of children is especially heart-rending.

In India alone, 40 million children lack education, health and opportunities. 22 million children are child laborers, and twenty percent of children between the ages of six and fourteen have no access to primary education.