Avie Schneider

Updated at 5:02 p.m. ET

The power plays for Hollywood's biggest studios are coming fast and furious.

Comcast on Wednesday made a $65 billion offer for some of the biggest Hollywood holdings of 21st Century Fox, the global television and entertainment conglomerate controlled by Rupert Murdoch and his family. The deal would not include Fox News.

Updated at 12:18 p.m. ET

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross on Thursday announced a deal with Chinese telecommunications company ZTE that includes a $1 billion fine — a move that may indicate progress in high-stakes trade talks between the U.S. and China.

After nine years and 2,630 posts, the All Tech Considered blog is being retired.

NPR Managing Editor Sara Kehaulani Goo acknowledged the important role blogs have played in "finding and growing a digital audience for our stories." But, she added, "when it comes to news, 'blogging' no longer defines what we're doing." Our audience, she said, finds stories in many other ways.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is known for being outspoken and unscripted. But he took that to a new level in a remarkably blunt and contentious call with Wall Street analysts Wednesday after the automaker reported a record loss of more than $700 million last quarter.

"Excuse me. Next, next," an irritated Musk said on the conference call with analysts who follow the company. "Boring, bonehead questions are not cool. Next?"

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

The Dow Jones industrial average lost 459 points Monday, falling 1.9 percent, as tech stocks led the markets down and investors eyed growing trade tensions with China. Earlier in the day, the Dow was down more than 700 points.

Amazon tumbled more than 5 percent after President Trump criticized the company in tweets. The tech-heavy Nasdaq index lost 2.7 percent. The S&P 500 index lost 59 points, or 2.2 percent.

Updated at 4:05 p.m. ET

U.S. stock indexes surged about 3 percent Monday after fears eased of a trade war with China. The two big trading partners reportedly are negotiating to improve U.S. access to Chinese markets.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the U.S. and China have "quietly started negotiating" and that U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is considering a trip to Beijing for talks.

Worries about a possible trade war helped send stock prices down sharply Thursday, with the Dow Jones industrial average losing nearly 3 percent of its value.

The Dow finished at 23,598, a decline of 724 points. The drop left both the Dow and the Standard and Poor's 500 index in negative territory for the year.

When President Trump announced that the United States would impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports earlier this month, European allies warned that they could retaliate. Targets might include classic American exports such as bourbon, blue jeans and Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

Now, the European Union has published a 10-page list of hundreds of U.S. products that could be subject to European tariffs.

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

A day after dropping more than 1,000 points, the Dow rebounded Friday to close up more than 300 points. But the index lost nearly 5 percent for the week as the markets focused on rising interest rates, inflation and ballooning government debt.

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

The stock market went on a wild ride again on Monday, with the Dow Jones industrial average closing down 1,175 points, its worst point drop in history. The Dow closed down 4.6 percent and turned negative for the year.

At one point Monday afternoon, the Dow was down 1,579 points — the largest intraday point drop in the history of the index.

Updated at 6:01 p.m. ET

Major stock indexes dropped sharply Friday, with the Dow Jones industrial average tumbling 666 points amid signs that wage growth is finally picking up.

The 2.6 percent drop in the Dow came as the Labor Department reported that 200,000 jobs were added to the economy last month, which was stronger than expected, and the unemployment rate stayed at 4.1 percent — the lowest since 2000.

Updated 12:55 a.m. ET Monday

People traveling through Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport struggled to get home Sunday after a power outage there forced hundreds of flight cancellations.

Officials announced that power had been fully restored to the airport shortly after midnight.

The power went out early Sunday afternoon and hundreds of flights at the world's busiest airport ended up canceled. Many travelers were stuck in grounded planes for hours.

A Japanese maker of materials used in airplanes and car parts has admitted that one of its subsidiaries falsified quality-assurance data, the latest in a string of Japanese industrial giants to mislead customers.

Toray Industries said Tuesday that it had identified 149 instances of altered data between 2008 and 2016. The products involved affected 13 customers and included cords used for tires and car hose belts.

Updated at 10:03 p.m. ET

President Trump on Friday announced that Mick Mulvaney would become acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, hours after outgoing Director Richard Cordray tapped his own interim successor.

Earlier Friday, the CFPB announced that Cordray had named Leandra English, the agency's chief of staff, as deputy director to take over the bureau.

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

Richard Cordray, the embattled director of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, announced Wednesday that he will leave the agency by the end of November.

"I am confident that you will continue to move forward, nurture this institution we have built together, and maintain its essential value to the American public," Cordray wrote in an email to the agency's staff.

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