Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Jeremy Daniel

Will Ray can thank his mother, and a bet, for his career. The Kenosha native is currently starring as J.M. Barrie, the author of the original Peter Pan, in the National Broadway Touring Company production of Finding Neverland.

PostSecret

Storytelling is having a moment in the sun. From national programs like The Moth to local ones like Ex Fabula, telling our stories out loud in front of an audience seems to something we want to engage in and listen to. PostSecret:The Show is a bit different.

Denver Museum of Nature and Science

The largest exhibition on the ancient Maya ever to be displayed in the United States is currently on view at the Milwaukee Public Museum. This pre-Columbian civilization flourished in what is now Central America, and had advanced mathematics, a complex written language, and sophisticated art and architecture.

NASA

One of the key pieces of technology that has enabled space exploration is the Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomy contributor Jean Creighton, who also leads UW-Milwaukee's Manfred Olson Planetarium, celebrates the telescope's four most important contributions in her current program: Hubble's Cosmic Quest.

Penguin Random House

Milwaukee author Nick Petrie has given up his day job. Thanks to the bestselling success of his Peter Ash series, the former contractor and building inspector now puts author in the occupation line on his tax returns. It’s a very welcome change, but one that was a long time coming - about a decade or so.

Petrie says it's still a little strange to not be tethered to the daily work world. "I feel sort of like Wile E. Coyote after he's run off the cliff. My legs are going and I'm trying really hard not to look down."

Simon & Schuster

Lake Effect first talked with writer and Wisconsin native Cynthia Swanson a few years ago, when her debut novel, The Bookseller, was published. It went on to become an award-winning New York Times bestseller.

Mark Frohna

The 1950s kicked off what was known as “the Space Age,” an era in which real Cold War fears were manifested in popular culture’s monsters and space aliens.

Nathaniel Davauer

The soundscape that you hear when you click on the audio for this post was composed especially for Pull, a dance work premiering tonight at the Pabst Theatre. The piece was choreographed by Milwaukee Ballet Leading Artist Nicole Teague-Howell, and the composer is MIAD grad and Milwaukee based artist, Luxi. It was the first time they had worked together and Teague-Howell says it was a wonderful opportunity to stretch their artistic wings:

 

Original artwork by Ian Anastas / Cooperative Performance

Immigration, and the stories of immigrants, are front and center in this country - from the debate over the future of DACA, to the proposed border wall, no-fly lists and travel bans.  It is a challenging time to be an immigrant in this country.

Juan-Miguel Hernandez

Each month cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect to talk about life as a touring classical musician. This month, we find Cohen making a big professional change: After 6 years, he performed his final concerts as a member of the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet. Cohen is returning to a predominantly solo career.

Ross Zentner

According to Merriam-Webster, the first known use of the word “equivocate” was in 1590. The dictionary further states the word has a couple of meanings: To use language especially with intent to deceive, and to avoid committing oneself in what one says.

Playwright Bill Cain says there is a further meaning, that equivocation can be a way to get to the deeper truth. How we use what appears to be the language of lies to tell a more profound truth is at the core of his 2009 play of the same name.

Shizuka Takemura

Thursday through Sunday, UWM’s Dance Department presents its annual Winterdances concert at the Kenilworth East building on Milwaukee's east side. These performances are often topical, reflecting the interests and concerns of both the dance faculty and their students.

Mazos Hamburgers / facebook.com

Milwaukee’s dining scene is vibrant enough that it’s tempting to always seek out the new, hot establishments.  And while new can be great, Lake Effect contributor and Wisconsin Foodie host Kyle Cherek says not to forget our dining heritage.

"I'm not saying don't go to the new places, because we need that energy, they're beloved, people are working very hard," he says. "But when you're thinking about 'Where should we go?,' for many people it's being a tourist in your own town."

Doubleday/Penguin Random House

Colson Whitehead has won just about every literary accolade there is for The Underground Railroad: The Pulitzer prize, the Carnegie Medal, and the National Book Award are but three. The book is also a New York Times best seller and it’s being translated into 40 languages.

Tom Bamberger

Tom Bamberger is not shy. The award-winning photographer and architecture critic is known for his acerbic take on the shortcomings of Milwaukee’s architecture and public spaces. But Bamberger has a soft spot for the new Northwestern Mutual Tower and his affinity extends to the plaza in front of the building

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