Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

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NASA

Every month, we travel the stars with our astronomy contributor Jean Creighton. Creighton is the director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium on the campus of UW-Milwaukee.

We’ve talked about everything from visible constellations to exoplanets to landing a probe on a comet. Now that it's summer, we are talking about light - star light, infrared light.

Photo by Dan Bishop

The longest day of the year, the Summer Solstice, is just about here. In celebration, music and dance will be playing out among the landscape of the Lynden Sculpture Garden this weekend. The performance is a special collaborative performance of the 17th Century Purcell classic The Fairy Queen.

Charles Nadeau / Flickr

It is picnic season in Wisconsin, and if your picnic plans include a bottle or two of wine, contributor Ray Fister might have some wines that could strike your fancy.

After visiting several Wisconsin wineries, Fister shares his experience as well as wine recommendations to try this summer:

The corruption in Illinois politics is often seen as such a farce that if you pitched an Illinois political scandal as the plot for a book, no one would buy it.

But Illinois politics have inspired plenty of books and movies – and probably no one has done it more convincingly in recent times than mystery writer Michael Harvey.

The Yeats Society / http://www.yeatssociety.com/

Today is the 150th anniversary of the birth of W.B. Yeats.

From Jonathan Swift to James Joyce through writers of today; the Irish literature tradition has remained a strong one. 

However, throughout history no name is as large as poet William Butler Yeats. W.B. Yeats won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923, and his work continues to hold great influence a century later. 

Courtesy of the Harley-Davidson Museum

Willie G., as he's known throughout the Harley-Davidson world, is a legend when it comes to motorcycle design.

He's also been painting with watercolors for over 50 years.  The Harley-Davidson Museum will highlight the work of Willie G. Davidson for their special summer exhibit, opening on Saturday, June 13.

Charles Allis Art Museum / charlesallis.org

The art form known as burlesque has a distinctly American influence. And within its American heritage, burlesque owes much to a Midwestern influence.

That aspect is especially on display in an exhibit open now at the Charles Allis Art Museum in Milwaukee. Stars such as Gypsy Rose Lee, Lili St. Cyr, Rose La Rose, Dixie Evans and contemporary performers such as Dita von Teese and Amber Ray are examined. 

"Burlesque...is no longer the mainstream that it was, but it has influenced all the major forms of entertainment today," says Annemarie Sawkins.

simulation.law.marquette.edu

You might remember the game Sim City... It had users create and manage a city, making key decisions along the way about what to build, how much to spend and how to prioritize.

A new website developed by Marquette University and the Public Policy Forum, or PPF, takes a page from the Sim City playbook. But in this case it doesn’t ask you to develop a new city, it asks you how you would fund the one we live in.

Partners in Art / http://partners-in-art.com/index.html

"There's no place like home," says Michael Paul Thiry of Partners in Art.

After a  successful 15 year stint in the Southern California art community, Milwaukee artists Jerry Hirschmann and Michael Paul Thiry (also known as Partners in Art) have returned home. With them, they have brought their unique blown glass and stainless steel flower sculptures, which also double as practical bowls and plates and have gained them notable praise.

Carroll University

Public art often gets a bad rap – rightly or wrongly.  Typically an artist is chosen, a piece is created, installed, and the only real public part is whatever reaction you have to it once it’s on display.  Artist Kasia Ozga works differently.

She takes the public part of public art quite literally.  Her latest project is a public art installation based on water at Carroll University in Waukesha, being installed with the public’s help and input at the university.

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