Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Itzhak Andres / Wikimedia

The rise of digitization has made archiving and sharing scholarly information much easier than it once was, especially for subjects with a selective appeal. Such is the case with Yiddish theater.

The Yiddish theater flourished in 19th and early 20th Century Europe and, towards the end of its heyday, in the United States. The subject matter ranged from the humorous, to the melodramatic or even political. No matter the central topic, Yiddish theater was wildly popular for Jewish audiences around the world.

Renaissance Theaterworks

The plot reads like something out of a tabloid. Over the course of three years, three women all marry the same man. Not at the same time, of course. But they befall the same fate - murdered for their trouble. The fact that this is a true story just adds to the intrigue.

Renaissance Theatreworks opens their season with The Drowning Girls, based on the true stories of "The Brides in the Bath" murders in England, during the early 1900s. 

Chris Ranson / Lakefront Brewery

A UWM professor has teamed up with Milwaukee’s Lakefront Brewery to recreate an Iron Age brew, inspired by evidence her team uncovered in an archaeological dig.

Nathaniel Davauer

As the Milwaukee Ballet prepares to open its 47th season with a new production of Scheherazade, audiences will see a new dancer on stage in the role of "The Moon Prince." Jonathan Batista comes to Milwaukee from the Cincinnati Ballet.

Beth Lipman

Glass artist Beth Lipman is known far and wide for her detailed, overlapping glass installations that appear to drop over the edges of tables and look as though they could fall over with a puff of wind. Her work is in permanent collections at the Smithsonian and the Milwaukee Art Museum, among other places.

Devin Pedde

One of public radio’s flagship shows is beginning a new chapter. Chris Thile officially begins his tenure as the host of A Prairie Home Companion with Saturday evening’s broadcast live from the Fitzgerald Theatre in St. Paul, Minnesota.

The show was created by Garrison Keillor in 1974. And except for a few years in the late 80s and early 90s, Keillor has remained its face and voice. But last year Keillor announced his retirement and the transition to the new host began.

The Marion Consort / Facebook

The early 13th century was a time when Western music was beginning to experiment with harmony singing and with pieces heard outside the context of a church mass. And its in this period that we find the repertoire for a concert coming to Milwaukee this weekend. 

digboston / Flickr

A pretty special concert tour is rolling into Milwaukee. Steve Earle, Buddy Miller, Robert Plant and others are all on the same bill to perform and raise awareness and money for refugees around the world. The tour is called LAMPEDUSA and it benefits Jesuit Refugee Service’s Global Education Initiative.

Mitch Teich

Like all music groups, the Milwaukee-based band Dead Horses has evolved over time. In fact, they weren’t always a Milwaukee-based band – they started in Oshkosh in 2010. Since then, they, and their following, have gotten a lot bigger. The band has now shared the stage with acts like Trampled By Turtles and Elephant Revival.

Mitch Teich

This week's Bubbler Talk question comes from Jim Thompson, who teaches mechanical drawing at MATC.

"I saw on a map there were two Honey Creeks in Milwaukee. One’s down close to the [Kinnickinnic River], and the other is up by the Menomonee [River] in Wauwatosa. And I was wondering if they’re just one stream or two separate streams."

Before we searched for the answer, we were curious why Jim wanted to know:  "I happened to be putting together a jigsaw puzzle…"

Photo by Stephanie Berger /

Theodore Dreiser was one of America’s great novelists in the early part of the 2oth century. His books reflected a changing America as the country and the world became a less rural and more urban place.

Among the themes he explored was the changing role of women, far before the modern feminist movement. Sister Carrie is an early Dreiser novel and follows Carrie from rural Wisconsin to Chicago as she seeks to make a new life.

Tanya Dhein

Milwaukee's InTandem Theatre is known for its love of comedy. And the play opening Thursday falls square in the realm of comedy.

Local playwright Michael Neville wrote Dracula Vs. the Nazis a couple decades ago, and InTandem put it on ten years ago. It’s a two-person, quick-change show that sees each actor take on multiple roles.

Bonnie North

The harp has been around for millennia. There is evidence that people were making and playing some form of the instrument throughout Africa, Europe and Asia from at least as early as 3500 BCE.

The instrument we generally think of as a modern harp, however, is a relatively new addition to the fold - it’s only been around since the late 17th century. The concert harp has a series of pedals that enable the performer to change the pitch of individual strings – allowing them to play all the notes in a western musical scale.

LMspencer / Fotolia

Tuesday afternoon, UWM welcomes an award-winning scientist, writer and educator from across the state for the annual Dean’s Distinguished Lecture in the Natural Science.

Michael Brosilow


When Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947, it was a huge step forward in the role of African-Americans in professional sports. But big-time, professional sports had a much earlier story of integration in this country.