Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Frank Walsh

Dance is perhaps the cruelest art form. The physical toll on the body is immense. Most professional dancers, who probably started dance classes in elementary school, have begun second careers by their early 30s.

But we retain the ability to move into old age, even if it's limited. So why should expressive and artistic movement be limited to the young?

Janna / Fotolia

October is prime apple picking season in Wisconsin. Orchards not far at all from Milwaukee’s city center allow people to pick their own and for many families doing so is a rite of passage.

Wisconsin Foodie host and food contributor, Kyle Cherek, is all about good food. And he says apples certainly qualify.

"Wisconsin is an ideal place to grow these things between our sun, between our good soil, between our great source of water and then the crisp nights," explains Cherek. "We're really ideal for this things that came from the other side of the world originally."

Renaissance Theaterworks Facebook

The stated mission of Tonia Sina’s organization, Intimacy Directors International, is to “create safe places for dangerous work." The dangerous work in question is intimacy on stage, which at first glance might not seem terribly dangerous. But if not handled correctly, intimate scenes can place actors in awkward, uncomfortable, or even abusive situations - even when no malice was intended.

Kathy Wittman

The Florentine Opera kicks off its fall season in a decidedly lighthearted mood. Franz Lehár’s operetta, The Merry Widow, premiered in Vienna in 1905 and has been wildly popular on stages across the world since then. The story concerns a wealthy widow, a series of misunderstandings between her and a long lost love, and attempts to hang onto her money by marrying her to the “right” man.

natbasil / Fotolia

The fall theatre season is well underway across town.

photogolfer / Fotolia

Tomorrow evening at the North Shore Congregational Church in Fox Point, the Milwaukee/Chicago based Great Lakes Baroque ensemble opens its third season with a program that focuses on the music of the late French Baroque period.  Music for the Last Queen showcases French composers of the late 18th Century - just prior to the French Revolution.

John Sturdy

The October issue of Milwaukee Magazine is its annual “Best Of” issue, and it features some of the highlights of the city in areas ranging from the familiar, like "Best Taco" to the lesser known titles, like "Best Boozy Art Class."

Managing the whole operation is the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Carole Nicksin, who says the annual "Best of," is one of her favorites. 

In Tandem Theatre

Do you remember cramming for a test?  Trying to regurgitate everything you learned over a semester so that you could pass the final exam and get out of high school intact? Sure you do.  That’s the situation a twelfth grade English class finds itself in, in In Tandem Theatre's production of All The Great Books (Abridged) this month. But there’s a twist.

Chasing Bubbles / facebook.com

If you knew the late Alex Rust when he was a young man, you might not have expected he'd become the subject of a documentary.  Rust was a farm boy from Indiana who became a day trader, working at the Chicago Board of Trade.  By the time he was 25, he realized he had other fish to fry.

Ross Zentner

There’s been a lot of recent attention paid to women’s accomplishments in math and science - from the film Hidden Figures, which showcased the contribution of four African-American women to the US space program in the 1960s. 

dendron / Fotolia

For more than 20 years, the Milwaukee ensemble Quattro Horns has played at everything from corporate events to the commencement at the Medical College of Wisconsin, to weddings and private parties.  Three of the four members - Robert Ditmer, Joe Hill, and Jo Hoffmann - have been with the group since its founding.  Dain Shuler is the new kid on the block.

NASA

Dr. Kathy Sullivan hadn’t planned to go to space. The former astronaut went to school to study earth sciences, later earned a doctorate in geology. She worked as an oceanographer, but decided to apply to be an astronaut for the chance to see Earth with her own eyes and not through lenses.

HIBROW.TV

Cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect every month for On That Note, an ongoing conversation about the life of a touring classical musician.

Recently, Cohen made a large technological leap, which he's been contemplating for years. He bought a tablet. "I am now using an iPad on a special stand to read my music," he explains. 

Chris Crain / Facebook

If you don’t know of Milwaukee musician Chris Crain, you should. The church musician, R&B singer, and multi-instrumentalist has overcome a lot to get where he is. Crain was born with brachial plexus palsy which prevents his left hand and arm from functioning fully.

milwaukeenotebook.com

What happened to the bathhouses that used to be along the Milwaukee River?

That’s the question listener Laura Hatrich submitted to WUWM’s Bubbler Talk. “I see some structural footprints, but wonder how and why they were removed,” she wonders.

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