Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Thomas Mohr Photography

Tuesday, April 25 would have been Ella Fitzgerald’s 100th birthday. The woman known as the first lady of song and the queen of jazz had a pure tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and what’s been described as a "horn-like" ability to improvise. And while she wasn’t the first jazz singer to scat, she elevated it to a high art.

Moriah Bame

On Monday, April 10th, the back room at Colectivo on Prospect avenue was home to a very spirited discussion between 5 Wisconsin radio talk show hosts, two moderators, and the studio audience.

It was the fourth in a series of community events called MilMag Live!, produced by Milwaukee Magazine and Lake Effect. This month’s topic was based on a feature story by the magazine’s managing editor Tom Tolan called, "Do We Even Need Talk Radio Anymore?"

Dan Mullen, flickr

Phil Lapayowker has noticed a distinct lack of what some people unkindly call ‘flying rats’ in Milwaukee.

"I was listening to a podcast and they were talking about animals in cities and stuff, and they ended with 'Do you know what color a pigeon’s eyes are?' and I was like, I have no idea!" he says. "So I’ll go look for one, or when I’m walking I’ll see one I’m sure. And I’ve never run into one in Milwaukee… I mean it’s kind of crazy. You go to other cities like Chicago and they’re everywhere."

In Tandem Theatre

American composer and songwriter Bob Merrill is probably best known for the Barbra Streisand mega-hit Funny Girl, which opened on Broadway in 1964. But before that, in 1961, he debuted Carnival!

Based on an earlier film starring Leslie Caron, the show ran over 700 performances on Broadway before it closed in 1963. Some of its songs include Rum Ticky Ticky Tum Tum, Always, Always You and Love Makes The World Go ‘Round.

kubais / Fotolia

Every so often, when he isn’t off in California trying out this year’s vintage, Ray Fister stops in to chat about wine. Lake Effect's wine contributor is the co-creator and voice of the wine blog and podcast Life Between the Vines.

Courtesy of Luminous Theatre

The Simpsons achieved cult status years ago. It started off as a series of drop in shorts during the Tracy Ullman in 1987, but by 1989, the animated sitcom began its own run. It has recently been renewed through at least 2019, and is the longest running scripted television in history. 

Penguin Random House

This month marks the 100th anniversary of the official entry of the United States into the First World War. The US had been fighting wars along the Mexico border and in Cuba before it entered the European conflict in 1917.  But it took WWI to turn the United States into the global military power it has become.

Jordan Acker Anderson

Artists often teach others to paint, sculpt or draw. They might do it because they love it or because they need to supplement their income, or a combination of both. But as anyone who teaches knows - skill, dedication, and a significant time commitment are required to do it well. That often means artists don’t have enough time or energy to devote to creating their own work.

Lorenzo Lotto / Archivio fotografico Gallerie dell’Accademia

Each month, cellist Robert Cohen joins us for a segment for an inside look into the life of a professional classical musician.

This month, Cohen had the opportunity to perform in a very special room at the Brera Gallery in Milan, Italy, for the opening of a Lorenzo Lotto exhibition. He was part of a series that linked the mentality of the painters and sculptures to the mentality of the composers of the pieces chosen to accompany the art work.

Ross Zentner

 

Joe Hanreddy is a familiar name to theatre audiences in Milwaukee. He was the artistic director at the Milwaukee Rep from 1993 to 2010. During this tenure the company created and staged more than 50 new American plays in addition to classics from Shakespeare to Tennessee Williams.

 

Maria Petrella / Umbrella Group Milwaukee Facebook

One of the signature lines of Shakespeare’s tragedy, Macbeth is “Is this a dagger I see before me?” In traditional productions of the play, only the actor playing Macbeth can envision that dagger. But thanks to advanced digital technology the audience for Umbrella Group Theatre’s new production can say, “Why yes, that is a dagger you see before you.”

Every month, Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger comes to the Lake Effect performance studio to play a song with friends and fellow musicians. 

In this The Monthly Beatdown with John Sieger, the singer-songwriter plays a tune with two members the group Semi-Twang, Mike Sieger on bass and Mike Hoffmann on Nashville, high strung guitar ahead of the group's performance at Anodyne Coffee in Walker's Point tonight.

Sinn Féin / Flickr

Last week, British Prime Minister Theresa May formally triggered Article 50, which starts the process of the UK’s departure from the European Union, known as “Brexit.” Public opinion in Great Britain remains sharply divided on the process, just as it was when the issue was put to a vote last year.

Tom Davenpport / Milwaukee Ballet

The world of classical ballet is one of tradition.  Choreography for ballets like Sleeping Beauty or Swan Lake has been passed down through generations of dancers and choreographers.  And while some ballets represent 21st Century interpretations of traditional works, others seek to present a performance that is as close an experience to the original as possible. 

courtesy of Renaissance Theaterworks

The end of the first world war in 1918 - the “great war” - heralded a marked shift in western culture. Music, theater, visual art, and literature all changed, both in response to the war’s carnage and as a way of deflecting its horror.

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