Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Anna / Fotolia

As many coffee aficionados know, love for coffee can be a powerful force. But widespread adoration for coffee is nothing new. In fact, Johann Sebastian Bach dedicated a song to the beloved beverage many years ago. On Friday, Great Lakes Baroque performs Bach's "Coffee Cantata" at the Skylight's Cabot Theatre as part of an all-Bach musical program.

The Golden Age of Hollywood ran from 1929 - when the “talkies” were introduced - to the 1960s. Film stars were groomed and promoted by a studio system that could be both supportive and exploitive. When the studios began to break up in '60s, many of the stars they made famous were entering their old age. Some were still working by the late '70s, others were happily, or not, retired. But they were still accessible to fans in a way that modern celebrities aren’t.

Jennifer Brindley

This weekend, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra accompanies the Academy Award®-winning motion picture West Side Story live on stage at the Marcus Center.

Andrew Hinkle / Milwaukee Pride

PrideFest Milwaukee kicks off today, starting Milwaukee's busy season of festivals along the lakefront. This year's PrideFest features bands like The B-52s and LGBT activists such as Danica Roem. But the festival is about more than national acts - it's also an opportunity for local artists to showcase their work.

courtesy of Robert Cohen

Robert Cohen is an internationally recognized cellist who joins Lake Effect each month to talk about the life of a working classical musician. It's a series we call On That Note.

Cohen is no stranger to working with young musicians - a great part of his career is about teaching young, aspiring cellists, students who hope to perform on the world's concert stages one day. But more recently, Cohen has also been working with students who have no such dreams or professional expectations. These older adults choose to learn to play the cello for other reasons.

annschein.com

Every two years, Milwaukee hosts Piano Arts, an internationally renowned competition for young, early career pianists. For the past week, students have been performing in a series of recitals, and soon the finalists will take the stage to compete for the top prizes.

Michail Takach

1968 was a pivotal year for so many facets of American culture, from the anti-war and civil rights movements, to rapidly changing musical styles, to women’s rights. It was also a time of great change in America’s gay society. While the Stonewall riots in New York City didn’t happen until a year later, 1968 was a crucial year in Milwaukee’s gay history, especially in the Walker’s Point neighborhood.

Bonnie North

Milwaukee singer-songwriter, Claudia Johnson and her band, recently released their new EP, Nothing But Time.

The five-member Milwaukee band hasn’t been around all that long, but almost all of the musicians in the group are well-known on the local scene.

Singer and songwriter Claudia Johnson is joined by Joe Hite on keyboard, Kelp Chofs on bass, and Jack Forbes on drums. Don Moore will play guitar for the performance at Club Garibaldi.

Tom Davenport

While the dancers get most of the notice in a performance of Swan Lake, the music they dance to is no slouch either.

Written by Pyotr Illyich Tchaikovsky in 1875-76, the score for Swan Lake is still one of the most popular classical pieces of music in history. The music is lush, passionate, and Tchaikovsky at his most romantic.

Mark Frohna

Urinetown, The Musical won three Tony Awards for best book, score, and direction of a musical in 2002. It's a very tuneful satire that takes on our legal system, social responsibility or lack thereof, corporate greed and mismanagement, and musical theatre itself.

Craig A. Mullenbach / Fotolia

There have been astronomers in Wisconsin for a long time. There’s the Yerkes Observatory near Lake Geneva. There are astronomy programs at places like UWM and UW-Madison. And even a private observatory up in the Northwoods.

But astronomy contributor Jean Creighton tells Lake Effect’s Bonnie North that well before European settlers landed in the area, Wisconsin's Native Americans were already studying the night sky.

Mohamed Amin

It’s hard to overstate what a prolific photojournalist Mohamed Amin was in his relatively short life. When the Kenyan native died in 1996, he left behind 2.5 million still photographs and more than 5,000 hours of raw video, shot during his 33-year career. Until now, almost none of that work has been displayed in the United States.

Alain Elorza / Flickr

One of the luminaries of French cuisine died early this year. Paul Bocuse is credited with basically introducing American diners to French cuisine, and demystifying it. He also launched or mentored the careers of many American chefs, including Milwaukee’s own Paul Bartolotta. 

Bartolotta is the restaurateur behind Bacchus, Lake Park Bistro, and Ristorante Bartolotta. He joined food historian and Lake Effect contributor, Kyle Cherek, to talk about Bocuse's legacy with Lake Effect's Bonnie North. 

Coutesy of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

The viola, like the accordion and the banjo, is often the butt of musical jokes. Not as dramatic as its string cousins the violin or the cello, the viola nevertheless has a beautiful sound and is a crucial part of orchestras and chamber music ensembles.

Andy Stenz

Milwaukee’s Bel Canto Chorus has been making music for almost 90 years. The organization offers local singers a chance to perform a wide choral repertoire at a high standard.

As a part of the community in which it performs, the group has always presented concerts that reflect on current events. This Wednesday’s concert, The Immigrant Story, is no exception.

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