Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Theatre Gigante

Most of us know the story of Tarzan, the boy raised by apes in the jungle.  We also know about the object of his affection - the woman called Jane. A play getting its U.S. premiere in Milwaukee starts with those well-known characters, but rapidly veers into uncharted territory.

Darklens Photography

Theo Wilson did not imagine his curiosity would find him leading a national conversation about race in the United States.  The rapper, actor, and slam poetry contest winner simply wanted to know more about why people in the alt-right movement thought and felt the way they did.

So, Wilson assumed an online white supremacist persona called “Lucius25” and spent about six months interacting with people on those forums. And he learned a lot, not just about them, but about himself and his own echo-chamber.

Jason Joyce

The Florentine Opera presents Viva Opera! March 16 and 18 at the Marcus Center's Uihlein Hall. It's an evening of some of opera's greatest hits, featuring music from Madama Butterfly, Nabucco, Carmen, La Bohème, and The Pearl Fishers, among others.

Photo by Mark Frohna

Offenbach’s operetta The Tales of Hoffmann is a classic. It’s the story of the poet Hoffmann, his quest to find true love, and his three ill-fated love affairs. In its full glory, the original lasts well over three hours, requires a couple of dozen singers, and, in true operatic fashion, various characters die after singing.

Paul Ruffolo

The Milwaukee Chamber Theatre's production of Tarell Alvin McCraney’s play The Brothers Size tells the story of two brothers trying hard to find, or cling to, their paths in life.

No Studios

Oscar-winning filmmaker and Milwaukee native John Ridley formally unveiled plans to bankroll a new, for-profit creative hub in an old Pabst Brewery building on West McKinley avenue.

Ed Block spent 35 years as a professor of English at Marquette University. But during those years he wasn't just writing academic papers and analyzing other people's writing. Block was always working with his own creative inspirations.

 

Robert Cohen

This month's On That Note is all about everyone’s second favorite topic - the weather.

For most of us, weather is either nice or annoying. But musicians monitor temperatures and humidity levels with a devotion verging on the fanatical. Their livelihoods depend upon both their bodies and their instruments being in the best condition possible. And when temperatures are particularly cold and dry, it's hard on both.

Michael Brosilow

Immigration is a hot-button topic, but it is not a new hot-button topic. From the time the first Europeans displaced the indigenous peoples in this hemisphere (and probably even before that), who was welcome to make their home here has always been up for heated debate.

Audrey Nowakowski

For WUWM's second Lake Effect On-Site, the team headed to Bay View and paid special attention to one of the most distinctive neighborhoods in Milwaukee.

In front of a sold-out crowd at Enlightened Brewery and Twisted Path Distillery, Lake Effect's Mitch Teich and Bonnie North dug into some of what makes Bay View so great - its history, its vibrant dining and brewing scene, and its culture:

Jeremy Daniel

Will Ray can thank his mother, and a bet, for his career. The Kenosha native is currently starring as J.M. Barrie, the author of the original Peter Pan, in the National Broadway Touring Company production of Finding Neverland.

PostSecret

Storytelling is having a moment in the sun. From national programs like The Moth to local ones like Ex Fabula, telling our stories out loud in front of an audience seems to something we want to engage in and listen to. PostSecret:The Show is a bit different.

Denver Museum of Nature and Science

The largest exhibition on the ancient Maya ever to be displayed in the United States is currently on view at the Milwaukee Public Museum. This pre-Columbian civilization flourished in what is now Central America, and had advanced mathematics, a complex written language, and sophisticated art and architecture.

NASA

One of the key pieces of technology that has enabled space exploration is the Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomy contributor Jean Creighton, who also leads UW-Milwaukee's Manfred Olson Planetarium, celebrates the telescope's four most important contributions in her current program: Hubble's Cosmic Quest.

Penguin Random House

Milwaukee author Nick Petrie has given up his day job. Thanks to the bestselling success of his Peter Ash series, the former contractor and building inspector now puts author in the occupation line on his tax returns. It’s a very welcome change, but one that was a long time coming - about a decade or so.

Petrie says it's still a little strange to not be tethered to the daily work world. "I feel sort of like Wile E. Coyote after he's run off the cliff. My legs are going and I'm trying really hard not to look down."

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