Colin Dwyer

T-Mobile has agreed to pay a $40 million fine to settle a federal investigation into its former practice of faking ring tones when calls couldn't connect in rural areas. The Federal Communications Commission announced the settlement Monday, saying that in the course of the agency's investigation, T-Mobile acknowledged it had injected such false ring tones into "hundreds of millions of calls."

Updated at 1:28 p.m. ET

In Armenia, demonstrators have gathered by the thousands in the city of Yerevan as lawmakers elected former President Serzh Sargsyan to be the country's new prime minister Tuesday. But they have not descended on the country's capital to congratulate the longtime leader on his new role.

Brett Connolly's idea had to have seemed simple at the outset.

The little girl had been banging away on the glass during warm-ups before the Washington Capitals' first round playoff matchup with the Columbus Blue Jackets. What she lacked in age and stature, she clearly made up for in enthusiasm — so why not give the budding superfan a souvenir she could cherish?

Updated at 4:44 p.m. ET

Out of more than 2,400 submissions, distinguished projects in just 21 categories earned gold Monday as winners of the 2018 Pulitzer Prizes.

Billy Mitchell has broken his silence.

Three weeks after Colombian militants abducted a trio of Ecuadorean press workers, the president of Ecuador, Lenín Moreno, has confirmed what many in the country had feared: Reporter Javier Ortega, photographer Paúl Rivas and driver Efraín Segarra have been killed by a dissident faction of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons says it has confirmed the U.K.'s findings on the identity of the poison used against a former Russian spy and his daughter last month.

Updated at 2:45 p.m. ET Thursday

Oh, you've seen them before: those little stickers or tags making clear that if you want your warranty on a product to remain valid, you'd better leave one or more of its parts untouched. The idea, of course, is that consumers are barred from using third-party parts and repair services for the product if they would like to hang on to that guarantee.

Andre Ingram didn't know why his exit interview had been bumped up a day. But he had his bags packed anyway. A longtime veteran of the NBA's minor league, he knew there was no need to dawdle after his season wrapped with the South Bay Lakers in El Segundo, Calif., especially with his wife and their daughters waiting for him in Virginia.

After three members of the Swedish Academy resigned Friday, protesting its response to a long-simmering scandal, the committee known for awarding the Nobel Prize in literature has found itself in unfamiliar — and precarious — territory: Beyond examining the merits of an author's past work, as it does each year, the centuries-old group is now also facing questions about its own future.

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva's deadline has come and gone, and still the former Brazilian president remains a free man — for now, at least. He has hunkered down with his supporters in a São Paulo suburb, some 280 miles from the southern city of Curitiba, where a judge's order had mandated that he present himself to police by 4 p.m. ET Friday.

One month after Sergei and Yulia Skripal collapsed on a shopping center bench, apparently poisoned, the Russian ex-spy and his daughter are showing marked signs of improvement. Hospital officials announced Friday that Sergei is "responding well to treatment, improving rapidly and is no longer in a critical condition," just one week after his daughter reached stable condition.

The last time Saudis could walk into a commercial movie theater, buy a bucket of popcorn and settle in for a silver-screen spectacle, that film may well have been E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Or Tron, maybe — or Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan?

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