Erin Toner

News Reporter

Erin Toner is a reporter for WUWM. Erin was WUWM's All Things Considered local host from 2006 to 2010. She began her public radio career in 1999 at WMUK in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Prior to joining WUWM in 2006, Toner spent five years at WKAR in East Lansing, Michigan.

During her career, Toner has served as a mentor for NPR's Next Generation Radio project, trained and mentored college students and taught a news reporting course at Michigan State University. She holds a degree in journalism from Michigan State University.

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There are still loose ends in the case of a white Milwaukee police officer fatally shooting an unarmed black man.

This week, the city’s Fire and Police Commission upheld former officer Christopher Manney’s dismissal. Members agreed with the chief that Manney violated department policy in his encounter last April with Dontre Hamilton and deserved to lose his job because of the harm caused.

Erin Toner

The U.S. Supreme Court will not consider the constitutionality of Wisconsin's voter ID law, meaning the state is free to impose it, but the AG says not next month.

Absentee ballots have already been mailed and early in-person voting started Monday, so state Attorney General Brad Schimel says it's too late to enforce the law for the April 7 election.

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Monday marks the fifth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act’s passage. Experts and politicians continue assessing the law’s impacts. WUWM’s Erin Toner caught up with UWM Prof. Owen Thompson, who studies the economics of health care. Thompson says some dire predictions, such as insurance premiums would skyrocket, have not come to pass.

Erin Toner

It used to be that if you wanted to see a doctor for your annual checkup or the flu, your options were Monday through Friday, during the day. But things are changing.

Many providers now offer extended hours to make seeing a doctor more convenient, and discourage visits to emergency centers.

Dr. Mushir Hassan is working through a busy morning of appointments, popping in and out of patient rooms, and pulling up charts on the laptop he totes. All pretty routine, except it’s a Saturday, a day doctors normally have off and many healthcare clinics are closed.

Former Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold is acting a lot like a candidate.

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Gov. Walker’s proposed budget would change the way thousands of Wisconsin families get care for an elderly loved one, or a member with disabilities.

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Thousands of low-income Wisconsin residents who get federal subsidies for their health coverage could be impacted by a case the U.S. Supreme Court is considering.

Wisconsin is set to become the nation's 25th "right to work" state. Republicans in the state Legislature are fast-tracking a bill to Gov. Scott Walker, who is a potential 2016 presidential candidate.

The state Senate passed a right-to-work bill late Wednesday, and the State Assembly could pass it next week.

The measure aims to weaken private sector unions by letting workers opt out of mandatory dues. Wisconsin Republicans appear to be following an anti-union playbook that's been circling the Midwest.

Erin Toner

The controversial option of double-decking I-94 near Miller Park is off the table.

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Public school supporters swarmed the streets around Gov. Walker’s home in Wauwatosa Monday. The demonstrators are upset with his proposed budget, which would reduce K12 school aid by nearly $130 million next year.

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