Jack Hurbanis

Digital Intern

Jack Hurbanis started as the WUWM Digital Intern in January 2020. 

He is currently a senior at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he is studying film production and communication. 

Outside of work, he can be found cooking with friends, going to see a movie at the Oriental theater, or enjoying the many seasons Milwaukee has to offer. 

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When the Democratic National Convention (DNC) first announced it would be coming to Milwaukee, there was a lot of hope for what it would bring to the city. Now, the future of the convention is unclear.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made large gatherings risky. And while the Democratic National Committee has pushed the date of the convention to August, it seems almost certain that we’ll still be dealing with this pandemic in some form.

Captain Samual Eastman / National Library of Medicine / Wikimedia Commons

We recently covered how the Oneida Nation Wisconsin is turning to indigenous agricultural practices to put food on the table during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Restaurants put $225 billion into the economy every year. While some are still in business, almost 450,000 independent restaurants must change operations to meet new safety measures or face the risk of closing completely due to the coronavirus pandemic. This will also impact the 11 million food service jobs — most of which were part of the initial flood of unemployment applications. 

>>Latest WUWM & NPR Coronavirus Coverage

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When vape pens first came out they were marketed as a healthier alternative to smoking. But as more research has been released about the longterm affects of vaping, it’s complicated that narrative. 

BlackPaint Studios

If you've driven through the intersection of First Street and Pittsburgh Avenue in Milwaukee's Walker's Point neighborhood during the last few weeks, you might have seen a bold statement painted on the windows of BlackPaint Studios: Wisconsin's Pandemic Primary = Crime Against Humanity. 

Julian Hayda

WUWM reporters and producers have been working hard covering how the coronavirus pandemic is impacting southeastern Wisconsin. We received a Bubbler Talk question about how WUWM staff are still bringing you the news while working from home. So, we thought we'd share how we're making it all happen.

>>Latest WUWM & NPR Coronavirus Coverage

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Many health care workers risk their physical and mental health to do their jobs. The coronavirus pandemic has intensified these challenges.

Just last month, emergency department medical director Dr. Lorna M. Breen committed suicide. Her family cites her work helping COVID-19 patients as the reason.

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In April, a TV news station in Bakersfield, Calif., interviewed two immediate care doctors about their views on the coronavirus outbreak. Within days, the American College of Emergency Physicians and the American Academy of Emergency Medicine condemned the interview as “reckless” and their opinions “untested.”

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There's been a lot of news recently about President Trump limiting immigration. On April 22, he signed an executive order suspending new green cards from being issued for immigrants looking to become permanent U.S. residents. There are some exceptions, like for children of U.S. citizens or for health care professionals coming to help fight the spread of COVID-19. 

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As nonessential businesses keep their doors closed around the country, small business owners are losing capital needed to make payroll, pay bills, and try to reopen when it’s allowed.

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Many of us have been cooped up in our homes as we collectively ride out the coronavirus pandemic. But the stay-at-home order doesn’t mean you need to stay inside. And for those of us living with kids, getting out in the garden can be a great way to get rid of some energy and exercise their creativity. 

Gardening expert Melinda Myers shares some gardening projects for kids of all ages:

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Although conversations about the coronavirus are really inescapable, there are still a lot of misperceptions and questions about the disease. For Bubbler Talk, we've been asking listeners what they want to know about the disease and how it's spread.

Dr. Joyce Sanchez is an assistant professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin who specializes in infectious diseases. She is here to help answer some of your coronavirus questions: 

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Pandemics and recessions are trying times, not only for people but for businesses. Some businesses rise to the challenge and serve customers in their time of need, while others see it as an opportunity for fraud and profit over people.

Consumers may need help to spot the difference and protect their wallets while protecting their health as well.

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Every month, Adam Carr from the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service talks about some of the community events happening in Milwaukee. But of course, this month is a little different.

With the coronavirus pandemic and Gov. Tony Evers' safer-at-home order, it’s a little difficult to go and explore things happening in our community. But Carr has you covered — highlighting things you can experience from the comfort and safety of your own home.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph

Many of us have probably never lived through something like a viral pandemic.

But your grandparents might have.

Before the coronavirus outbreak, the last time America faced something like what we’re living through now was in 1918 during the Spanish flu. As many as one-third of the world contracted the virus — 50 million people died.

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