Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for The Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

She just moved to Milwaukee’s East Side, where she lives with her cats Misses and Marvin. Joy spends much of her free time drawing, painting and practicing the mandolin.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

John Flannery / Flickr

This summer, the northern hemisphere sees some pretty spectacular astronomical events. The Perseid meteor showers will peak in mid August and about a week after that, parts of the United States will witness the first total solar eclipse since 1979. It’s also the first one visible from the Pacific ocean to the Atlantic since 1918.

The number of GED graduates at Milwaukee’s main test sites plummeted beginning in 2014, the year a new GED test — a computer-based exam that focuses on higher-order thinking — was adopted across the nation. Still, educators agree that the new test assesses the skills that are needed to succeed in today’s workplace, and the passing rate has improved — from 47 percent in 2014 to 72 percent in 2016.

One of the major promises Donald Trump made during his presidential campaign was a significant change in the United State's relationship with China - in light of the communist nation's rise to the top of the global economy. Some of Trump’s rhetoric has softened since he took office, and since his meetings with top-level Chinese leaders.

Junius Brutus Stearns - / Wikimedia

Update, Friday, June 16:

The Wisconsin Assembly passed a measure calling for an Article V Convention, as well as two other measures regarding the parameters of the convention and the attendees. The proposals now head to the Wisconsin Senate. 

Original Post, Friday, February 3:

tpsdave / pixabay

Milwaukee is often called a city of neighborhoods - and with good reason. By some estimates there are more than a hundred distinct neighborhoods in the city, each with their own unique culture and community traditions.

LISTEN: One Question, Lots of Answers: How Are Milwaukee Neighborhoods Named?

But when it comes to talking about the city's “hottest” neighborhoods, Milwaukeeans tend to rely on some familiar favorites.

psphotography / Fotolia

From physical ailments to post-traumatic stress disorder - the health issues facing veterans are getting much more attention than they used to. In the Milwaukee area, most of the care veterans of all ages receive happens through the Veterans Administration and the Clement Zablocki VA Medical Center. But the VA doesn’t always go it alone.

Office of the President of the United States / Wikimedia

It’s hard to overstate how irregular the news cycle is at the moment. With new allegations about the Trump Administration’s Russian ties coming out seemingly on the hour - it can be difficult to make sense of what’s really going on, even for journalists.

Women of color in Milwaukee will be disproportionately harmed by a provision in the American Health Care Act ending Medicaid reimbursements for abortion providers, such as Planned Parenthood. This could result in severely limited services such as gynecological exams, STD testing and treatment, and contraception.

Until she was 20, Tiferet Berenbaum, 34, had never seen a gynecologist. She had never had a Pap smear, or even heard of one.

While Milwaukee may be considered the United States’ most segregated city, our neighbors just south of us aren’t too much better. Chicago is consistently ranked as one of the most segregated cities in the U.S., and much like Milwaukee, its history is rooted in government sanctioned racism.

For decades, racially restrictive covenants forced black Chicagoans to live in a designated area of the city known as the Black Belt. The use of these covenants was struck down by the Supreme Court in the late 1940s, but that wasn't the end of their impact.

Jonathan Shoemaker / Aja-Monet/Facebook

It’s hard to encapsulate a person’s life and experiences in printed words. No matter how eloquent the writing, there will always be moments and pieces left to speculation. This was one of Aja Monet’s biggest worries when she first considered publishing her poetry.

formulanone / Flickr

It’s hard not to see the many changes currently happening in the city of Milwaukee. From the torn-up streets making way for the new Milwaukee Streetcar, to the ongoing construction of the new Bucks Arena - the city is making a visible transformation, unlike anything seen in recent decades.

And it’s not just Milwaukeeans who are taking notice. U.S. News and World Report just ranked Milwaukee as one of the top three up-and-coming places to live in the country.

Mestic / Facebook

While Wisconsin is known as the Dairy State, perhaps a better moniker would be: the Land of Milk and Manure. With more than 1.2 million dairy cows in Wisconsin, the state is inundated with trillions of pounds of manure every year.

But Wisconsin is not alone. The proliferation of large-scale farming in the United States and throughout the globe has left many communities dealing with a poop predicament.

By day, Stephen Anderson is a psychologist whose practice is based in Milwaukee. But in his spare time, Anderson is also a well-regarded poet, with many published works to his name. His latest collection, In the Garden of Angels and Demons features a mix of old and new poems, which vary in both form and content. Anderson will read from the collection for an event at Boswell Book Company on Wednesday, May 24.

A Discovery

jovannig / Fotolia

Earlier this year, WUWM highlighted racial disparities in our Project Milwaukee series: Segregation Matters. The series looked at the history of segregation in the city and how it impacts things like housing, health care, and education.

Andrea Waxman

In spring 2013, the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service started an occasional series of stories about four graduating high school students who participated in a program that helps students from low-income families get into college and earn a degree. Four years later, they checked back to see how they are doing.

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