Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Jeramey Jannene / Flickr

Cities around the country are facing an affordable housing crisis and Milwaukee is no different. That's one of the reasons this year's Henry W. Maier State of Milwaukee Summit at UWM is focusing on the city's on-going issues with housing. 

This year's topic also pays tribute to the 50th anniversary of the March on Milwaukee and the fight for fair housing in the city. 

Elelicht / Wikimedia

Since July, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has been reporting on a series of stories about tourists at Mexican resorts who have experienced mysterious blackouts, resulting in robbery, assault, rape, and death. The culprit? Tainted alcohol - though exactly how it was tainted is another question.

David Banks/Getty Images

Certainly, Wisconsin and Illinois have storied rivalries in the sports arena: the Green Bay Packers vs. the Chicago Bears, the Brewers and the Cubs, the Bucks and the Bulls. But a few of our listeners have been wondering if that competitive spirit runs deeper than the action on the field.

One such listener, Jason Gessner, reached out to Bubbler Talk and asked, “Have Wisconsin and Illinois always had contentious relationship or is that a more modern development?”

Dave Nakayama / Flickr

Right now, there are more than two million people incarcerated in the United States - but that’s just a small fraction of people with a criminal record.

More than 75 million people living in the United States have been convicted of some kind of crime, most of whom spend the majority of their lives in free society. But just because they served their sentence, that doesn’t mean they’re free from consequences associated with their conviction.

Joy Powers

Skipper’s Alley has found a following in places far from their home in Dublin. The Irish band has played on cruise ships, on a St. Patrick’s Day tour in the African nation of Zambia, and now the group is bringing their music to Milwaukee with a performance at the Irish Cultural and Heritage Center

Skipper's Alley describes itself as a "modern Irish folk band with an old-school approach," and their music falls within the traditional Irish music genre - more generally. 

Courtesy of Paul Walter

It’s listener suggestions that inspire the features that make up our weekly Bubbler Talk segment. But Bubbler Talk itself was the inspiration for a student project that played out earlier this year in the community of Slinger.

NASA/COBE Science Team / Wikimedia

John Mather shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2006 for his work with the Cosmic Background Explorer, or COBE. Launched in 1989, the satellite was instrumental in developing our understanding of cosmic microwave background radiation.

So, what is that? 

"The cosmic background is the sort of light and heat that come to us from all directions, way out there from the distant universe. So not coming from objects, but from whatever is really, way farther beyond that," Mather explains. 

seregraff / Fotolia

Most people who interact with cats on a regular basis have had at least a few perplexing moments with them. Human beings look at cats as fairly inscrutable animals, but cat behaviorist Jackson Galaxy would argue that a lot of that confusion comes from what he terms “looking at cats through dog colored glasses.”

Audrey Nowakowski

For the inaugural Lake Effect On-Site, the team headed to the Rafters Room at Three Cellars in Oak Creek. The conversation focused on this southern Milwaukee County community's rapid growth. 

Looking around modern Oak Creek, the huge developments taking place would have come as a surprise to the people who called the area home a hundred years ago. In fact, Oak Creek wasn’t even incorporated as a city until the 1950s.

Joy Powers

If you happen to be walking by Milwaukee’s Oriental Theatre around midnight (the second Saturday of every month), you may see scantily-clad people wrapped around the lobby waiting with anticipation for a unique - yet somehow ubiquitous - experience.

U.S. Army Europe / Flickr

The work of the United Nations is honored at this time each year with United Nations week. Despite a speech by President Donald Trump to the UN General Assembly last month, the place of the United States in the global political sphere is tenuous. Foreign aid and the State Department have been in the cross-hairs when it comes to cuts to the federal budget.

In 1953, Denis Dubis was born at St. Luke’s Hospital in Milwaukee. After decades of struggling with his identity, Denis was reborn as Denise Chanterelle DuBois and is the author of the new memoir Self-Made Woman.

The book explores her life growing up in suburban Greendale, struggling with her identity, an unstable home life, and ultimately, drug and alcohol abuse.

Christopher Boswell / Fotolia

Earlier this year, Lake Effect spoke with researchers Dmitri Topitzes and Joshua Mersky about their research on the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences, also known as ACEs.

These encompass a variety of things that can happen in childhood - including different forms of abuse, neglect, and household dysfunctions. Research has found that ACEs can have a huge impact on a person’s ability to succeed later in life. 

Tamara Thomsen / Wisconsin Historical Society

There are thousands of shipwrecks in the Great Lakes - many of which haven’t been seen by human eyes for more than a century. The area off the coast of Ozaukee, Sheboygan and Manitowoc counties is home to 37 known wrecks, and researchers say there could be as many as 80 undiscovered shipwrecks.

Maayan Silver

Six years ago, Will Lautzenheiser was starting a job teaching film at Montana State University, when he started to feel a pain in his leg. After his first two classes, he went to the hospital where he went into total organ failure. In a matter of days, a strep infection had caused Will to lose his arms and legs.

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