LaToya Dennis

News Reporter

LaToya Dennis joined WUWM in October 2006 as a reporter / producer. LaToya began her career in public radio as a part-time reporter for WKAR AM/FM in East Lansing, Michigan. She worked as general assignment reporter for WKAR for one and a half years while working toward a master's degree in Journalism from Michigan State University. While at WKAR, she covered General Motors plant closings, city and state government, and education among other critical subjects.

Before coming to public radio, LaToya interned at the CBS affiliate in Lansing, Michigan. She also took part in NPR's 2005 Next Generation Radio Project in Kansas City, Missouri as well as NPR's summer 2006 Next Generation Radio Project in Indianapolis, Indiana.

LaToya holds both a Bachelor's degree and a Masters degree in journalism from Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Dennis is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists.

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LaToya Dennis

City leaders are remembering Ald. Joe Dudzik today as a proud family man and one who fought for his constituents. Dudzik died after hitting construction barricades while on his motorcycle Thursday night on the city’s southwest side. On Friday Alderman Jim Bohl fought back tears.

“I was proud to have alderman dudzik as a colleague, but I was more proud to have him as a very close friend,” Bohl says.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Ann Althouse, Flickr

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, better known as WEDC, is in the limelight once again. 

FRANK JUAREZ / FLICKR

The Milwaukee School Board will hold its first meeting Thursday since the Legislature’s budget committee approved several items that could greatly impact MPS. Perhaps the biggest would be the creation of a Recovery School District. 

It would give an independent commissioner oversight over failing MPS schools. At Thursday night’s school board meeting, members are expected to discuss giving the MPS superintendent similar powers.

Milwaukee School Board member Larry Miller says the state budget language stunned him.

Mary Spicuzza ‏/ Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The Milwaukee Fire Department says all passengers made it out of an Amtrak train after a fire in the locomotive.

First responders were notified of the fire in the passenger train just after noon Thursday on the city’s south side near E. Walker and S. Barclay streets. The train was coming from Chicago and headed to downtown Milwaukee.

LaToya Dennis

Black Lives Matter. The phrase has become a rallying cry across the U.S. among people upset about cases of police brutality against black men.

In Milwaukee, another movement is afoot. It aims to let people know that black love also matters.

One organizer of the Black Love movement is Shawn Muhammad. He’s better known in the community as Gat Turner – an emcee and spoken word artist.

“The string of recent events with gun violence and fighting and a lot of drama that’s going on in our community, we believe that that’s a result of self-hatred,” Muhammad says.

F.Schmidt - Fotolia.com

Fewer babies died last year in Milwaukee than the previous year, but city leaders aren’t yet ready to celebrate. Infant mortality remains troubling, especially among African Americans babies.

84 infants died prior to their first birthday last year across Milwaukee. Black babies died at nearly three times the rate of white babies.

LaToya Dennis

Thursday marked one year since former Milwaukee Police Officer Christopher Manney shot 14 times and killed Dontre Hamilton. 

Thursday night, the Hamilton family, along with supporters commemorated Dontre’s life with a march to Red Arrow Park where he was killed. That’s also where the celebration took place. Hundreds of people came out to enjoy the live music, poetry, food and arts and crafts. There were people there of all walks of life and all ages. There was dancing, but there were also tears. At times, Dontre’s mother, Maria Hamilton, was overcome with emotion.

littleny - Fotolia.com

Wisconsin might restrict the types of groceries people can buy with FoodShare benefits.

On Thursday, an Assembly committee will listen to people's comments on the proposed new rules for the program designed to help low income people purchase food. Critics question whether the changes would be legal, because 100 percent of the funding for FoodShare comes from the federal government.

Uber App

It used to be that if you needed a ride, and public transit was not an option, you called a cab. These days, there are a lot more players in the game—companies like Lyft and Uber.

On Tuesday, the Assembly will vote on proposed statewide regulations for transportation network companies. The rules would supersede local rules, perhaps enabling the industry to expand into more Wisconsin communities.

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Bucks

Milwaukee is buzzing about the proposed new arena for downtown. The Bucks, on Wednesday, finally unveiled their blueprint.

It calls for the creation of an arena and entertainment district. The cost: one-billion dollars. Some business owners seem excited.

If you sort through the details of the plan, you find an arena that seats 17,000 people, a public plaza that would serve as an entertainment venue and a state-of-the-art practice facility.

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