Maayan Silver

Lake Effect Assistant Producer

Maayan Silver is an assistant producer for WUWM's Lake Effect program. She is also a practicing criminal defense attorney, NPR listener and student of journalism and radio production.

Alliance Francaise

From Solomon Juneau to Jean Nicolet, there are many French names we recognize in Milwaukee.

Anne Leplae and Mary Emory of the Alliance Française de Milwaukee want Wisconsinites to understand the French history and culture that permeates in Wisconsin beyond this week’s Bastille Days celebration.

Maayan Silver

At the intersection of 47th and Burleigh in Milwaukee's Sherman Park neighborhood, the Kosher Meat Klub and My Barbershop exist side-by-side. Their coexistence reflects a larger respect between the African Americans and Orthodox Jews living in the area.    

Maayan Silver

Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood has attracted its share of attention during the past year. Much of it negative. But, some point to Sherman Park as a success story, it’s one of the most diverse in a metro area considered one of the most segregated in the country.

Maayan Silver / WUWM

As diverse as music is, music-makers come from equally wide-ranging backgrounds - spanning gender, ethnicity and age. Leaders of the Wisconsin Intergenerational Orchestra (WIO) say their mission is to connect players in that last category, in order to bring listeners fresh takes on classical masterpieces.

Artistic director of WIO, Anne Marie Peterson, speaks about working with such a diverse group including Julliard-bound viola player Tabby Rhee and her 16-year-old brother Julian.

bfatphoto / Flickr

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.

On Lake Effect, we’ve looked at various issues surrounding mental health such as trauma, substance abuse, and the need for mental health nursing and other professions to help the Milwaukee community. Many assume mental health concerns are those of grown adults, but one psychologist is encouraging parents, teachers, and caretakers how to look out for a child’s mental health.

zinkevych / Fotolia

The medical system has long separated primary health care and mental health care. And in a city like Milwaukee where there are significant obstacles for people to have good access to healthcare – one aspect of a person’s health often suffers at the expense of the other.

Milwaukee Metro Voices

From Congress to city hall, Americans are engaging in heated national discussions, picking apart topics from climate change and the economy to gun control and healthcare. Particularly at town halls, where politicians aim to connect with their constituents, tempers have flared.

Leiko Napoli

For some people, jazz is life. Trumpeter Eric Jacobson is one of those people.

Dinislam Galeev

For Aleksandra “Sasha” Kasman, playing classical piano is in her blood. It's been passed down through her mother and her father - Yakov Kasman, who is an accomplished performer and professor of piano. The legend in her family is that when she was two or three she could sing through a Shostakovich concerto from beginning to end because she had heard her father practice it so often.

Kat Schleicher

Pastime Paradise, As, I Wish. Many are familiar with the original versions of these songs by music legend Stevie Wonder.

Anna Shternshis

You may be familiar with Yiddish as the language that brought us, among others, the words shlep (carry), kvetch (complain), and nosh (eat). It’s only spoken in limited communities today, but for nearly 1000 years Yiddish was the primary language of Ashkenazi Jews all over Europe -- until the Holocaust.

Michelle Brafman

Places like Washington D.C. and New York City get a lot of attention as urban centers. So much so that their suburban surroundings are often overlooked or derided. The late New York City mayor Ed Koch queried, “Have you ever lived in the suburbs? … It’s sterile. It’s nothing. It’s wasting your life.”

Connie Ma / Flickr

Life has moved along a bit since the 1980s, but certain concepts from that time still remain fresh. In 1989, urban sociologist Ray Oldenburg wrote The Great, Good Place. The book highlights local spots that are not considered work or home, but somewhere to informally gather and socialize. Cafes, coffee shops, bookstores, bars and barbershops are all considered "third places" where community, civic engagement and civil discourse is encouraged.

Courtesy of The Milwaukee Journal

Segregation in metro Milwaukee can be traced back, in part, to discriminatory housing practices like redlining and racial restrictive covenants. During the Civil Rights movement, there was large-scale pushback against such practices.

Stuart Seeger / Flickr

It used to be that coaches and trainers didn’t pay much attention when an athlete took a blow to the head during practice or competition. But that attitude has changed drastically over the last couple decades.

"I think we've gone a complete 180," says Lindsay Nelson, an assistant professor of neurosurgery and neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. 

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