Marge Pitrof

News Director

Marge has been with WUWM since it changed formats from music to news and information in the late 1980’s. Searching for a place where she could produce in-depth journalism, Marge was hired by WUWM as a reporter. For several years, Marge also hosted Morning Edition.

While a reporter, Marge was a frequent contributor to NPR and won numerous awards for her work.

Since fall of 2000, Marge has been managing the news department but still has the occasional opportunity to produce stories.

Prior to joining WUWM, Marge worked in commercial radio both as an afternoon news anchor and a field reporter. She also worked for short periods at a few TV stations.

» Contact WUWM News

Last week, while on the campaign trail, Gov. Walker was quoted as saying there are only a "handful of reasonable, moderate followers of Islam who don't share the radical beliefs" of Islamic terrorists.

In response, Ahmed Quereshi, president of the Islamic Society of the Milwaukee has written an open letter to the GOP hopeful. It states that a clarification from Walker would serve the best interests of all concerned, including the safety of American Muslims, including thousands in Milwaukee and their houses of worship.

The CEO of Wisconsin's besieged job creation agency plans to retire from his position on Sept. 25. Reed Hall says he originally accepted the job for a three-month interim period and now, three years later, it's time to resume his retirement.

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation has been plagued by reports critical of its performance. Criticisms include that it failed to track delinquent loans and lacked documentation to justify many of its decisions.

On Friday, the Dow plunged more than 530 points and it started Monday, by plummeting 1,000 points. The fear is that China’s economy is slowing, yet Brian Jacobsen, chief portfolio strategist at Wells Fargo Funds Management, is frustrated by the reaction.

Supporters of a bill to restrict secret John Doe investigations, insist prosecutors went overboard in looking for wrongdoing surrounding Gov. Walker. So an Assembly committee advanced limits on Thursday, with all Republicans voting in favor and all Democrats against.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

If Wisconsin Republicans voted in their presidential primary today, 25% would pick Gov. Scott Walker, according to the new Marquette Law School Poll. In April, 40% said they would select Walker.

Most state GOP voters favor other Republican candidates. Following Walker (25%) are Ben Carson (13%), Donald Trump (9%), Ted Cruz (8%), Marco Rubio and Carly Fiorina (each 7%) and Jeb Bush (6%).

UWM

The money will establish a Lubar Center for Entrepreneurship at UWM, on the corner of Kenwood Blvd. and Maryland Ave.  According to UWM Chancellor Mark Mone, the Lubar Center will house many of UWM's programs that prepare students to be entrepreneurs and innovators, and it will assist start-up local companies that are striving to bring more services and products to market.

"Wisconsin has fallen behind other states in creating new jobs and launching startup companies... bolstering this kind of entrepreneurial ecosystem is vital to a healthy economy and job creation,” Mone said.

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Bucks

The Wisconsin Assembly on Tuesday approved a funding deal for a new arena in Milwaukee. It would cover the public share; the Bucks’ former and current owners will contribute $250 million in private money. So after months of debate, the bill is headed to the desk of Gov. Scott Walker. The vote was not unanimous, 52 to 34, but the legislation did garner bipartisan support.

Marti Mikkelson

The consensus is that Milwaukee's elusive animal is someone’s exotic pet, according to Karen Sparapani, executive director of the Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Control Commission.

Her goal is to capture, not kill the big cat several people have reported seeing on the city's north side since last week.

Tia Nelson has resigned from her job with the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands, according to the Wisconsin State Journal. Nelson has served as the agency's executive secretary since 2004. Her father was Earth Day Founder and late Wisconsin U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson.

In April, the board prohibited Nelson and her staff from talking about climate change on the job or working on issues related to climate change. The ban came, after board member and State Treasurer Matt Adamczyk insisted the agency remove all climate change references from its website.

Wisconsin National Guard, flickr

The governor says he wants Wisconsin National Guard members to be able to protect themselves from attack, citing the shootings that killed five servicemen in Chattanooga, Tennessee last week.

Gov. Walker issued an executive order on Tuesday giving the state's Adjutant General Donald Dunbar the authority to arm guard members as necessary and to evaluate longer-term plans to better protect all of Wisconsin's soldiers.

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