Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

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WUWM

The eight Democrats vying for the chance to take on Gov. Walker this fall shared the stage at UWM last week for their only broadcast debate, with just weeks to go until the Aug. 14 primary.

In this week's Capitol Notes conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com what he found interesting about the discussion, and whether there was a clear winner.

WUWM

The eight Democrats vying for the chance to take on Republican Gov. Scott Walker this fall made their cases to voters in their only broadcast debate Thursday night, with just weeks to go before the Aug. 14 primary.

The Milwaukee Common Council Tuesday settled a lawsuit related to police practices

Milwaukee aldermen have approved a nearly $3.5 million settlement, related to the former police chief’s policy of routine traffic stops in high-crime areas. Edward Flynn set up the program in hopes that the practice would significantly reduce violent crime. But, the ACLU of Wisconsin filed a federal class action lawsuit last year. The organization claimed the policy amounted to thousands of illegal “stop and frisks” of African-American and Latino residents. The vote Tuesday followed a sometimes bitter debate.

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Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin's campaign could get a shot in the arm, as former presidential candidate and fellow U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders stumps for her in Eauu Claire this weekend.  Republicans are targeting Baldwin's seat in November and Sanders is considering another run for President himself in 2020.  In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, what it means for Baldwin to have a heavy hitter like "Bernie" rallying for her.

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Some Milwaukee residents and officials consider new Police Chief Alfonso Morales to be a breath of fresh air. Earlier this year, he took over for Edward Flynn, who retired. The Fire and Police Commission chose Morales to serve the final two years of Fynn's term. Morales has pledged to improve police-community relations, and some say he's making inroads. But a Milwaukee alderman thinks the public deserves a say in who heads the police department. 

He's pushing for a change that would allow citizens to elect the police chief.

Andy Manis/Getty Images

The Foxconn groundbreaking last week on Foxconn's huge LCD screen factory in Racine County was a big deal for Gov. Scott Walker. He pushed hard for the Taiwanese electronics giant to locate the plant in Wisconsin. 

The day after the groundbreaking, Walker celebrated the news that Foxconn plans to create at least 200 jobs in Green Bay.  Those workers will develop applications for Foxconn's display screens.

President Trump will be in Mount Pleasant, Wisconsin, on Thursday for the groundbreaking of Foxconn’s giant LCD manufacturing plant. The Taiwan-based company is building a $10 billion complex in Racine County and promising up to 13,000 jobs. In exchange, state and local officials offered Foxconn more than $4 billion in tax incentives, prompting cries of corporate welfare. There are also concerns to about the impact on air and water quality the operation would have on the region.

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After months of anticipation, groundbreaking will be held Thursday on the huge Foxconn complex in Racine County.  And President Trump, who advocated for the Taiwanese electronics giant to locate in Wisconsin, will be on hand for the festivities. 

State and local governments committed $4.5 billion in tax incentives to land the massive LCD screen manufacturing plant, and it could create up to 13,000 jobs. 

Althouse

A group led by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder worked to elect Democrats in last week's special elections in Wisconsin.  One of the two open legislative seats went to a Democrat, while a Republican captured the other.  

Now, another big Democratic national organization is getting into the mix.  It's a group formed by former President Obama.  The organization says it's targeting Republican Gov. Scott Walker in November.  It's also trying to get a Democrat elected to the seat currently held by House Speaker Paul Ryan.

Harry How/Getty Images

Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown is accusing Milwaukee police officers of discriminating against him because he is black when they used a stun gun last winter during his arrest for a parking violation.

A lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday says officers could have simply issued a citation instead of "unlawfully discriminating against Mr. Brown on the basis of his race."  

Officers detained Brown at about 2 a.m. on Jan. 26 outside a Walgreens store on Milwaukee's south side.  He was apparently double parked in a disabled spot.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday dismissed a challenge to Wisconsin’s political maps. Justices ruled that the plaintiffs lacked legal standing and failed to prove that individual rights were violated. The case now goes back to a federal district court. 

The decision virtually guarantees the current political boundaries will be in place for the fall elections.

After weeks of speculation about whether the “blue wave” would continue in Wisconsin, the results from Tuesday’s special elections are in, and they are mixed.

Republican Jon Plumer of Lodi won an Assembly seat north of Madison. He garnered 54 percent of the vote, to defeat Democrat Ann Groves Lloyd.  Meanwhile, Democrat Caleb Frostman collected 51 percent, to topple GOP state Rep. Andre Jacque for a state Senate seat in the Green Bay area.

Both districts lean heavily Republican, and both parties are claiming some sort of victory, in light of the varied outcome.

If you’ve been driving in Door County or the Green Bay area recently, you may have noticed a lot of yard signs. It’s because voters are gearing up to cast ballots later this month in a special election for state Senate, after Republican Frank Lasee resigned in December for a job in Gov. Walker’s administration.

Walker tried to delay the election, but a court ordered him to schedule it promptly, after a group led by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder sued.  The race pits Republican state Rep. Andre Jacque of De Pere against Democrat Caleb Frostman of Sturgeon Bay.

Next week, voters will head to the polls to cast ballots in special elections for two vacant legislative seats – one in Lodi, and one in De Pere. The contests will fill the posts of lawmakers who resigned last December, in order to join Gov. Walker’s administration.

Althouse

Hundreds of delegates are expected to gather in Oshkosh this weekend for the annual state Democratic Party convention.  This year's focus will be on the governor's race, as more than a dozen Democratic candidates have announced their intention to run against Republican incumbent Scott Walker in November.  But first, they'll have to get through a crowded Democratic primary in August.

In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, just how fired up delegates at the convention will be.

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