Michelle Maternowski

Digital Services Coordinator

Michelle is WUWM’s Digital Services Coordinator. She is responsible for all things digital - from overseeing WUWM’s digital platforms to managing WUWM's online and social media content.

She is also behind many special projects at the station. Michelle coordinates Bubbler Talk, a series that uses the Hearken platform to engage WUWM’s audience in the reporting process.

Michelle is involved with Precious Lives, a series on guns, kids and how to stop the violence in Milwaukee. In 2016, she was named station collaborator for Precious Lives: Before the Gunshots, which was part of AIR’s national Localore: Finding America initiative. Through that, came Precious Lives: The Live Show, a live performance series with which Michelle is deeply involved.

She, along with WUWM’s LaToya Dennis, created Let’s Talk, Milwaukee, a series of conversations that take place out in the community.

Michelle is part of the team that created the award-winning web project, More Than My Record, an offshoot of WUWM’s Project Milwaukee: Black Men in Prison series. More Than My Record allowed those who were formerly incarcerated to tell their own stories.

Before being named the station’s Digital Services Coordinator in 2014, Michelle was an assistant producer for Lake Effect (2007-2008) and WUWM’s Web Marketing Specialist (2008-2014).

She holds bachelor degrees in Marketing and Political Science from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

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Courtesy of Tetra Tech EM Inc.

For this week's Bubbler Talk, we look into a question submitted by Scott Wimer, who asked: What used to be located on the land south of Greenfield Ave., west of the Kinnickinnic River and east of the old Chicago/Northwestern tracks?

Perhaps you'd recognize that big, vacant plot (actually it's two distinct parcels) in the Milwaukee Harbor as formerly holding gigantic coal piles and dilapidated buildings.

Michelle Maternowski

Segregation comes with borders, whether they are manmade - 124th Street, the dividing line between Milwaukee and Waukesha counties, or natural - the Milwaukee River. Today, WUWM reports on one particular border, and how some people feel about crossing it.

Michelle Maternowski

It’s widely understood that Milwaukee is a segregated metropolitan area. But what’s less-appreciated is how segregation connects to other social issues the area faces.

Soon-to-be-released research by UW-Milwaukee professor Marc Levine links segregation to a key factor that overlays it – poverty. Levine is the director of UWM’s Center for Economic Development.

UWM Libraries American Geographical Society Library

“Segregation is not an accident,” according to Reggie Jackson, the head griot for American’s Black Holocaust Museum.

“There’s this idea that people self-segregate, but the reality is that there’s never really been self-segregation in Milwaukee,” Jackson says. “The segregation that we have, in terms of people of color, was created by a variety of different in institutions and individuals.”

DUSTIN A. CABLE, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, WELDON COOPER CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE, REFERENCE DATA BY STAMEN DESIGN

The assertion that Milwaukee is currently one of - if not the most segregated metro area in the United States is probably deserved but with some qualifications, according to UW-Milwaukee researcher Marc Levine.

An extraordinary number of blacks live in the city as opposed to in Milwaukee suburbs, and in the city itself - while it is diverse, African-Americans, whites and Latinos tend to live in neighborhoods with little diversity.

John O'Hara

Barbara Gensler, a legend in the local scholastic theater scene, has died.

According to her obituary in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Barbara Gensler passed away on January 30, 2017 at the age of 81.

Gensler was featured in WUWM's Life's Voices series in 2012 for her work in the community:

As well as on Lake Effect:

 Original post from May 15, 2012:

Susan Bence

Milwaukee Riverkeeper describes itself as “a science based advocacy organization working for swimmable, fishable rivers.” Unfortunately, the Milwaukee River Basin, which includes the Kinnickinnic, Menomonee, and Milwaukee Rivers and their tributaries, has some work to do before reaching that swimmable, fishable goal.

For the past decade, Riverkeeper has dispatched dozens of citizen scientists to monitor water quality in nearly 100 spots throughout the basin.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

If Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke does not resign, three Democrats from Milwaukee want Governor Walker to remove Clarke from office.

State Sen. Chris Larson and Reps. Christine Sinicki and Jonathan Brostoff call Clarke "a dangerous menace," citing four deaths that have occurred in the county jail in recent months, including of a newborn.

mementosis, flickr

On Thursday, the City of Milwaukee announced the first-ever Drug Mail Back Program. It will allow you to easily dispose of unused or unwanted prescription drugs stashed in your medicine cabinet. At select CVS pharmacies, you will find envelopes addressed to the police department. In them, you can pour unwanted medicines and drop the envelopes in the mail.

“While in one way, it is just a small initiative, it is certainly a vital one to stemming this growing crisis,”  says Milwaukee Alderman Jim Bohl.

Bonnie Petrie

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson became the first state Republican to win election to the U.S. Senate during a presidential year, since 1980. On Tuesday, he again defeated former Democrat Senator Russ Feingold in a rematch of Wisconsin's 2010 Senate race. Johnson's win helped Republicans remain in control of the Senate.

The incumbent argued that Feingold did not deserve to be sent back to Washington. Johnson told the Associated Press that he won Tuesday's election because, "I told the truth... I think the good folks of Wisconsin recognized that."

For the latest electoral count in the race for president, visit NPR's live blog.

As the results come in, projected winners of Wisconsin's Tuesday, November 8, 2016 general election will be marked in bold.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
Donald J. Trump (R)
Hillary Clinton (D)
Gary Johnson (L)
Jill Stein (Green)

Michelle Maternowski

Milwaukee lost a valuable voice on Thursday, when longtime radio broadcaster and community leader Eric Von died.

Von had more than 25 years in the broadcast industry. He could be heard weekday mornings on his WNOV 860 show.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

At a press conference Monday, Mayor Tom Barrett announced that the existing 10 p.m. weekday curfew for minors will be more strictly enforced.

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke has also ordered Sherman Park to close to the public at 6 p.m. Monday night. It will reopen at 6 a.m. on Tuesday. Clarke announced that the nighttime park closure will continue until further notice. People angry about the fatal police shooting of an African American man in Milwaukee took to the streets again overnight Sunday.

Michelle Maternowski

For updates, follow @WUWMradio on Twitter or this post from Monday.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett and Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn held a news conference Sunday afternoon to share details about the investigation into Saturday's events. Barrett said there is a photo that shows "without a question" that the African American man who was fatally shot by police was holding a gun.

NEBARI - FOTOLIA.COM

Projected winners of Tuesday, August 9, 2016 primaries are in bold.

U.S. SENATE

Winner faces incumbent Ron Johnson (R) and Phillip Anderson (L).

Democratic
Russ Feingold
Scott Harbach

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

District 1: Winners face Jason Lebeck (L)

Republican
Paul Ryan - incumbent
Paul Nehlen

Democratic
Ryan Solen
Tom Breu

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