Michelle Maternowski

Digital Services Coordinator

Michelle joined WUWM in 2007 as an assistant producer for Lake Effect. In 2008, she was hired full-time as WUWM's Web Marketing Specialist. And in 2014, Michelle was named WUWM's Digital Services Coordinator. She is responsible for managing WUWM's digital and social media content, strategizing and implementing WUWM's digital endeavors and overseeing WUWM.com.

Michelle holds bachelor degrees in Marketing and Political Science from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

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How can you and your cat better co-exist? Cat behavioral expert Jackson Galaxy sheds some light on the topic.

Galaxy is the star of the Animal Planet TV series, My Cat from Hell, and one of the nation’s leading cat whisperers. He will be in town Sunday at Turner Hall Ballroom as his, and Kate Benjamin's, new book, Catify to Satisfy, comes out.

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Any day now, workers will begin dismantling two historic Eschweiler buildings on the former Milwaukee County Grounds in Wauwatosa. 

WUWM 89.7 FM – Milwaukee Public Radio is one of 15 stations chosen after a national competition to incubate storytelling experiments and expand public media to more Americans.

Milwaukee County Board Chairman Theodore Lipscomb on Thursday filed a lawsuit against County Executive Chris Abele.  Lipscomb says he has serious concerns over extent of the County

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Some educators in northern Wisconsin aren't letting the fact that climate change is a politically charged issue sway them from teaching about the subject.

Cathy Techtmann is among them. The UW-Extension environmental outreach specialist decided it was time to rethink climate change education.

“The old model purely based on science were just not resonating with people,” Techtmann says. “A lot of people realize that there’s cultural component, not just a scientific piece but also a cultural piece that makes the issue come alive to people.”

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Late Monday in Madison, Gov. Scott Walker announced, "I will suspend my campaign immediately, I encourage other candidates to do the same." 

Walker said he believes he is being called to lead, by helping to clear a crowded field of Republican candidates. He also encouraged the GOP candidates remaining in the race to "offer a positive conservative alternative to the current front-runner," without naming real-estate mogul Donald Trump.

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Glendale-based produce wholesaler, Maglio Companies, has teamed up with Growing Power for an experiment.

This summer, the Milwaukee-based national leader in urban farming installed eleven hoop houses next to Maglio’s headquarters, just off I-43, to grow some of its own food. Inside, tomatoes grow in lush profusion.

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One part of Milwaukee that hasn't changed over the years is its flag, which some say is a problem. Graphic designer Steve Kodis is leading the charge to update the flag.

The Milwaukee flag doesn’t make too many appearances, to be honest. And when it does, you might be struck by how much stuff is on it – from the head of a Native American chief to a ship’s hull to a picture of another flag to a factory to something that looks oddly like a flying saucer.

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A new analysis of census and other population data shows that the Milwaukee metropolitan area (Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis) is among the regions seeing the most dramatic increases in the number of Black and Latino people living in neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty. 

The report, titled Architecture of Segregation: Civil Unrest, the Concentration of Poverty, and Public Policy, was released by The Century Foundation

Daniela A Nievergelt / Flickr

The water slides in the Wisconsin Dells today are a strange, accidental metaphor for the area's geological history. 

An ice dam that broke towards the end of the last Ice Age sent water from a glacial lake down the Wisconsin River, carving the fanatical sandstone cliffs that distinguish the Dells today.

That's one of many reasons why geologist Marcia Bjornerus sees beyond the Wisconsin Dells' water parks, tacky shirt shops, and salt water taffy.