Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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Adam Baker / Flickr

While most of the people who visited Irish Fest a few weeks ago were likely there to watch musical acts, another cultural attraction that many caught was Irish dance.  It’s a form that has a huge following in the Milwaukee area, even outside of the festival season.  Hundreds of kids attend any of several schools that prepare them for competitions.

But in the coming months, organizers hope the nation’s first professional Irish dance company will make Milwaukee home. 

Penguin Random House

Computers today are doing things that we thought were impossible, even just a few years ago.  They're doing everything from study legal briefs to driving cars, to vacuuming the house.  And that has society edging toward a tipping point.

"We've reached a point where the technology is now so advanced that it is eliminating jobs faster than it's creating new ones. That has never happened before," says Fortune magazine's senior editor at large Geoff Colvin

bacchanalwine.com

Ten years ago today, the mayor of New Orleans, Ray Nagin, declared a state of emergency and called for – at that time – a voluntary evacuation in anticipation of Hurricane Katrina reaching landfall. 

However within a day, the hurricane intensified to a Category 4 level, and the storm came ashore a short time later.  The surge from the Gulf of Mexico breached the levees protecting the city, and at its worst, nearly four fifths of the city was under water.  

Mike Schubert / Flickr

Today in Spain, many of the world’s top road cyclists hit the pavement again as the Vuelta a España – the Tour of Spain – continues.  It’s one of three Grand Tour events, along with the Giro d’Italia, and the Tour de France.

Saturday morning in Wisconsin, some dedicated cyclists will hit the road in Dubuque, Iowa. They’ll cross the Mississippi River, and then ride across Wisconsin to Kenosha in a single day.

Unlike the Grand Tour, this is not a race.

Penguin Random House

If you don’t know anything about Alexandra Petri’s column for the Washington Post, the fact that it’s called “Compost” should tip you off.  It’s a humor column, at least most of the time, appearing multiple times a week online and weekly in print.

Petri grew up partly in Fond du Lac and partly in Washington, D.C., while her dad, Tom Petri, represented his Wisconsin district in Congress.

epSos .de / Flickr

The financial markets in this country rebounded somewhat yesterday before falling once again. The now four-day trend was brought on, in part by turmoil in the Chinese economy.

"They are in a position to manipulate their currency," Lake Effect's foreign policy contributor Art Cyr says. "They've tried to do that to gain advantage, but as the current market crash shows, that doesn't really gain you an advantage over the long term."

New Rivers Press

Karen Lee Boren left her hometown of Milwaukee years ago, but it’s never been far from her mind, her heart or her writing.

Boren's new collection of twelve short stories, called Mother Tongue, features a remarkable array of characters. The stories were written over a span of twenty years, with characters and themes inspired by her own life experiences.

plantoo47 / Flickr

There are many people looking for solutions to complicated social problems. And while people may have ideas, they don't always have the business acumen needed to get started.

"There's a lot of people that have great ideas and want to get them off of the ground, but there is a little bit of a gap in the initial support at the early stage. And that's where we want to focus so that we can help accelerate and scale these organizations to provide broader impact to the community," Marquette social innovation coordinator Kelsey Otero says.

The latest Marquette poll results show a majority of Wisconsinites agree with this year’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage throughout the country.

That ruling came on the heels of a separate court decision in 2014 that effectively voided Wisconsin’s prohibition of them, as well.

Schlitz Audubon Nature Center, Facebook

If you've ever been to the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center on the lakeshore north of the city, you know there is a lot of the natural world on display. And if you haven't been there, just trust me.

But quantifying everything that lives at or grows on the nature center's grounds is a daunting task, and one that's being taken on by a cadre of scientists beginning Friday afternoon.

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