Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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liamcallanan.com

The oral history and public radio series, StoryCorps, frequently makes the point that “listening is an act of love.”  It is probably not a stretch to imagine that the fictional characters who drive writer Liam Callanan’s new book might buy into that idea.

Dennis Brekke / Flickr

With debate over the state budget continuing, Wisconsin legislators are hearing from public school administrators around the state who are concerned about significant proposed cuts to K-12 education spending.

But funding is not the only hot-button education issue on the legislature's agenda. There are also debates over standardized testing, Common Core standards, integration programs, and voucher and charter schools.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Between the recent Israeli elections to the deteriorating situation in Yemen, the Middle East is in the news again.

Our foreign policy contributor Art Cyr spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich to put things into context, starting with the root problems creating a potential path to civil war in Yemen:

Lake Effect contributor Art Cyr is Professor of Political Economy and World Business and the Director of the A.W. Claussen Center for World Business at Carthage College in Kenosha.

Jessica Z Schafer / RAM

Take some sugar, some corn syrup, gelatin, and potassium sorbate and you have…art? 

Brad Wilson / Flickr

Even before Hurricane Katrina changed just about everything in New Orleans, the state of Louisiana had started the process of reshaping the city’s public schools, creating an entity known as the New Orleans Recovery School District.  But the storm sped up the process and was used as the catalyst for nearly a wholesale state takeover of control of schools there.

Mike Kalasnik / Flickr

A spokeswoman for Governor Scott Walker says context is lacking in a report about a major gift to Walker's 2010 campaign. The story, by investigative reporter Michael Isikoff, was published yesterday in the online Yahoo News service. 

paukrus / Flickr

This spring is the 100th anniversary of one of the most notorious maritime tragedies in history – but there is probably a lot you didn’t know about the sinking of the Lusitania.

Stephen Brashear / Getty Images

Last week, the Starbucks coffee chain announced its initiative to get people to talk about the sensitive issue of race.  The plan was pretty straightforward – have its baristas write #RaceTogether on coffee cups and initiative conversations. 

But the idea almost immediately became the source of ridicule on social media, criticized as heavy-handed or quixotic.

But take Starbucks out of the equation, and how do you initiate a dialogue about race relations and inequality?

Mike Wright, Flickr

In a mix of sports metaphors, Tuesday's Reading Blitz represents a full-court press for organizations trying to improve reading skills among Milwaukee kids.

The day's effort, sponsored by the United Way of Greater Milwaukee and Waukesha County, is the culmination of a concerted effort to increase the number of volunteer reading tutors in the community.  Community engagement specialist Karissa Gretebeck says the effort is aimed particularly at the youngest readers.

antoniamurphy.com

In the modern day rat race of our constant and busy lives, few people actually act on the common thought of leaving the city behind and heading out in search of a simpler lifestyle.

Antonia Murphy was brave enough to actually do it. Murphy is an American whose primary experience with farm life came from an ill-fated effort to care for her father's chicken.

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