Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

aerogondo / Fotolia

A murder on Milwaukee’s north side two years ago is the jumping off point for a week-long series the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel launched Sunday on the issue of witness intimidation.

The series, The Intimidator, was produced by reporter Ashley Luthern and John Diedrich. It explores some of the common and sometimes brutal tactics employed by those trying to keep witnesses from coming forward. 

Safe House Milwaukee

For a half-century, the Milwaukee restaurant - the Safe House has served a helping of Cold War history alongside burgers, fries, and drinks.  The restaurant was founded by Dave Baldwin, a connoisseur of the Cold War and espionage.  The ownership changed hands more recently, but the walls of the Safe House are still adorned with memorabilia from the Cold War era.

And while its day-to-day missions are food and entertainment, the restaurant not long ago hosted two people with strong connections to the Cold War.

Mitch Teich

You might not recognize the name Aoife Scott immediately, but if you know anything about the Irish musical tradition of the past 30 years, you might recognize something about her voice. Scott is the daughter of Frances Black and niece of Mary Black - both internationally known singers.

People around the country are continuing to react with anger and horror to the events that took place at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

It was at this time last year that racial tensions bubbled to the surface in Milwaukee. The violence that erupted in Sherman Park following a police shooting put the challenges of Milwaukee’s black-white relations front and center for the world to see. 

Kevin J. Miyazaki / PLATE

In preparation for your next Taco Tuesday, dining critic Ann Christenson wrote the cover story on the best tacos in town in the August issue of Milwaukee Magazine. She explains that what we’re talking about here is tacos - not, strictly speaking, Mexican food.

"For better or worse, if you take a flour or corn tortilla and put some really delicious ingredients inside, wrap it up....it is a different form of sandwich," she explains.

The leading characters of two recent young adult novels live their lives in different eras, but one gets the feeling that if they were to meet somehow, they’d feel a kinship.  That was certainly the case with their authors, who became fast friends and undertook a book tour together.

Brickboys/Splunge Comunications

Milwaukee is known for its summer festivals. From Summerfest to Irish Fest and German Fest, and increasingly, MKE Punk Fest. The citywide festival celebrating punk music art and culture is into its seventh year. But the history of the punk scene here is much older.

Michelle Maternowski

The Lake Effect team headed to WE Energies Energy Park at the Wisconsin State Fair in West Allis as part of our summer series Full Plate, which has been showcasing agriculture in our region. 

Mitch Teich

A lot has changed at the Wisconsin State Fair since the 1920s, especially in the categories of foods on sticks, foods that are fried, and foods that are fried and placed on sticks.

trapperschoepp.com

We got to know Trapper Schoepp when he interned for Lake Effect in his freshman year at UW-Milwaukee. He stayed with us as an intern throughout his entire academic career, all the while writing songs and performing in ever more famous circles. In 2012 he released his debut album Run, Engine, Run.

Sara Stathas / Milwaukee Magazine

We hear stories of community heroes from time to time - people who made a big splash, saving lives, raising money, stepping in when others couldn’t - or wouldn’t. But there are also people who, every day, do something that make their community a better place to be.

Scott Olson / Getty Images News

It was five years ago on August 5th when a gunman walked into the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek and killed six congregants and injured others. It was one of the worst religious hate crimes carried out in this country, but it also brought many disparate parts of Milwaukee together in support of the Sikh community.

Commemorations of the anniversary are planned over the next two weekends. Leaders of the Sikh Temple are planning a major observance on August 6th. But people of other faiths and in the secular community will mark the anniversary as well.

Dori / Wikimedia

The Public Policy Forum just released a comprehensive report on how Milwaukee is supported with public money, compared to other peer cities around the country. The report found that compared to similar cities, Milwaukee is decidedly more reliant on state funds as a result of the city's inability to impose most forms of local taxation. 

Mitch Teich

Whitefish Bay painter and realtor Kathleen Davis says she had a recurring vision not long ago, involving her 18-year old son, Henry, an avid climber. 

"I was having these nightmares," she explains, "that Henry would look back at me and then just take a step off the mountain and that was it." 

Writer Bianca Marais was born in South Africa in 1976, a time when the country was still very much ruled under Apartheid laws that separated people of different skin colors.  It was the year of the Soweto Uprising, when Black high school students living in the ghetto designated by the White government outside Johannesburg marched in protest of the Apartheid laws.

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