Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Dave Reich, courtesy WI High School Cycling League

Hundreds of high school and middle school mountain bikers will line up at a sports complex in Iola on Sunday morning for the state championship of the Wisconsin High School Cycling League.  And while the league's co-founder and co-director says there will, indeed, be state champions crowned, she thinks the real victory is in the growing number of participants around the state.

"Our main goal is to just to get more kids on bikes," says Kathy Mock, "so that they have this activity to take with them into adulthood."

John Sparrow / facebook.com

Of all the iconic names in Milwaukee history, among the most enduring on the musical front is the Violent Femmes. The band emerged from the punk scene more than 35 years ago and scored hits such as Gone Daddy Gone and Blister in the Sun, and became one of the top alternative rock bands of the 1980s. 

Courtesy of the City of Milwaukee

Low-income public housing projects used to be thought of as islands, often cut off from the rest of city life. They were densely populated, high-rise apartment complexes, often troubled by gangs, drugs and other criminal activities. But over the last decade or two, public housing design has shifted. High rises are giving way to a more neighborhood-based approach.

Milwaukee Bucks

The Milwaukee Bucks open their NBA season this evening in Boston, against the Celtics.  They’ll play their first game at the BMO Harris Bradley Center on Friday against the Cleveland Cavaliers.  It’ll be the last opening night at the arena the team has called home since 1988.

In a feature in the October issue of Milwaukee Magazine, writer Zach Brooke explores the new arena that is rising downtown.

Penguin Random House

Writer David Barclay Moore worked for eight years for the New York-based anti-poverty nonprofit, Harlem Children’s Zone. His work involved shooting short-form videos that told stories about the people the group was seeking to help. This experience helped him to understand, first hand, the challenges faced by many of the people living in concentrated pockets of public housing.

A lot has happened in the last year and a half for singer-songwriter Tift Merritt.  A new baby, a new album, and a new creative outlet - textile design. 

Almost none of it has come simply or easily.

freshidea / Fotolia

There’s a lot that we can learn from our DNA. Some of it is information that’s important - like whether we’re predisposed to develop a disease. But that doesn't mean we can do something about it.  There is, however, a lot of information that we can use, such as learning how our bodies respond to different kinds of foods.

(vincent desjardins) / Flickr

The legislative bodies for the City of Milwaukee and Milwaukee County are taking up budget proposals made by their chief executives. And while both proposed budgets deal with a structural imbalance, they take it on in different ways.

coachwood / Fotolia

Title IX is a federal law passed in 1972 that seeks to provide equal opportunities for women and girls in any academic setting that receives federal funding. The law turns 45 this year, and it’s most visible and associated work has been in intercollegiate sports, where colleges and universities were required to bring women’s sports and sports scholarships into line with those offered to men.

Could the answer to the tone of discourse in this country lie in a series of picture books for children? It might be putting a lot of pressure on a publication, but Brad Meltzer is up for the challenge.

Meltzer is the author of numerous thrillers for adult audiences and has hosted a couple of series on the History Channel, most recently Brad Meltzer’s Decoded.

John Sturdy

The October issue of Milwaukee Magazine is its annual “Best Of” issue, and it features some of the highlights of the city in areas ranging from the familiar, like "Best Taco" to the lesser known titles, like "Best Boozy Art Class."

Managing the whole operation is the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Carole Nicksin, who says the annual "Best of," is one of her favorites. 

In the late 1970s and early '80s, Steve Martin was the most famous stand-up comedian in America.  Martin's albums, such as "Comedy Is Not Pretty" and "Wild and Crazy Guy" sold millions of copies and helped launch a career that went on to movies, novels, and stage plays.  But along the way, Martin lost his love for performing on stage in front of an audience.

courtesy Max Weinberg

Forty-two years ago this week, Bruce Springsteen played a concert at the Uptown Theater on Milwaukee’s west side.  The theater is long gone, but that show is remembered by many in Milwaukee, because it was stopped by a bomb scare, and then re-started, hours later.

Dennis Andersen

Folk singer Arlo Guthrie doesn't mind if "Alice's Restaurant" is still the first thing that pops to mind when you hear his name.  Guthrie doesn't play it at every show - in fact, he's not planning to play it in Milwaukee Friday night.  But he understands that his fans' love for a fifty-year-old song is as much about themselves as it is about the songwriter.

Photo by Damon Dahlen Scheleur / Huff Post/facebook.com

Since the 2016 campaign, a lot of us in the media have been trying to figure out exactly what’s on the mind of the American people, and how we got to this point.  There have been a lot of polls taken, a lot of surveys analyzed.

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