Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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In the last few years, two of the most contentious debates in Wisconsin have been over a proposed iron mine in northern Wisconsin and over the future of organized labor across the state. 

It’s a century-old story involving mining and labor in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan that is the focal point of a documentary by Milwaukee filmmaker Suzanne Jurva called Yoopera!  But there’s a twist – her film centers on an effort to produce an opera about this often-forgotten piece of history. 

Carl Wycoff / Flickr

The Milwaukee City Council paved the way yesterday for the Milwaukee Bucks to construct a new basketball arena.

Some in the community, such as Common Ground, had hoped the city would tie support for the arena to the Bucks’ support for other recreational facilities in the community.

One of the many features of this year's Milwaukee Film Festival is the Cream City Cinema series, which features films by and/or about Milwaukeeans. 

Shelly / Flickr

Of the many problems urban places face in the 21st Century, one that many thought was behind us was lead poisoning in children. Action figures are no longer made from the metal, lead paint was banned from use on home interiors decades ago, and even leaded gasoline that produced lead-tainted exhaust and residue has been gone from the scene for more than twenty years.

Andy Manis / Getty Images

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker ended his campaign for President yesterday.  Walker had until recently polled at or near the top among GOP hopefuls, both nationally and in key states such as Iowa and New Hampshire, and had attracted international media attention.  But after some missteps and limited success in two Republican debates, Walker’s poll numbers had fallen to near zero in the last few days.

Courtesy of Jennifer Evans

There’s a reason why we’re programmed to go to sleep and wake up at a certain time, and there’s a reason we feel discombobulated when that clock is disrupted.

But what scientists are beginning to unravel is the mystery of how disruptions of that body clock can have wide-ranging impacts on our physical and mental health. 

Marquette University biomedical sciences professor Jennifer Evans is one of those scientists and has just received a $1.7 million dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health to study those questions.

Next month will mark ten years since the Pabst Theater Group took over management of the Riverside Theater on Milwaukee’s West Wisconsin Avenue.

The theater has been on the verge of being gutted or demolished several times during its almost 90 years in existence. The Riverside has been more stable ever since developer and philanthropist Joseph Zilber launched a complete renovation of the space in 1984.

A report out this week offers a snapshot of an increasingly important sector of the Wisconsin economy. 

The report quantifies the economic output of the state’s bioscience sector, and how it relates to other Wisconsin industries. 

The report was commissioned by BioForward, the trade association for the bioscience industry.  It was released Wednesday, at the group’s Bioscience Summit in Madison. 

Jeramey Jannene / Flickr

If you work or spend any time downtown, you know that much of the business district can be a little slower on weekends than during the work week. But this weekend, some buildings downtown and in many other parts of the Milwaukee area will be bustling with activity. / Wisconsin Historical Society Press

Even with a warm couple of days this week, fall is unquestionably in the air in Wisconsin. You’ve probably been able to turn off the air conditioner, the leaves will soon begin to turn, and it’s time to finish picking tomatoes and start getting the sweaters and sweatshirts out of storage.