Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

» Contact Lake Effect

Ackerman and Gruber via Milwaukee Magazine

As the Latino population in Milwaukee continues to grow, so does the community’s influence on everything from culture to food to politics.

But as much as the evolution has been felt in urban places like Milwaukee, it is being felt even more strongly in some surprising places. Places like the small town of Curtiss, which is about 40 miles east of Eau Claire.

Milwaukee County

With the state budget complete, cities and counties are set to begin work on their fiscal plans for the coming year.  The City of Milwaukee holds a preliminary budget hearing later this week.

At the County level, the budget process will play out with new leadership. Milwaukee County Board Supervisor Theodore Lipscomb was recently elected to chair the board, replacing Marina Dimitrijevic.

WisDoc / Flickr

All summer, Jewish Museum Milwaukee has hosted an exhibit that views the history of baseball through the lens of the immigrant experience.

Chasing Dreams: Baseball and Becoming American features not only the stories of pioneering Jewish baseball players, but those of other immigrant communities.

Mike Mozart / Flickr

The grocery and discount retailer Meijer made headlines earlier this month with its second wave of store openings in the Milwaukee area. Shock waves have already been reverberating through other parts of the retail community here since the opening of a Nordstrom Rack discount store in the past year.

Milwaukee is relatively friendly to discount retailers. However, the opening of Wisconsin's first full-fledged Nordstrom department store shows it is also a competitive place at the higher end.

Mike McGinnis / Getty Images

When baseball season opened, there were high hopes for the Milwaukee Brewers.  They’d had a rough end to their 2014 season, but the pundits thought they had the potential to bounce back.

But, as we know by now, that didn’t happen – it’s been a struggle all year for the Brew Crew, and that was reflected when the team sent a host of players elsewhere in the last few weeks. 

Milwaukee's Diamonds in the Rough, Screen Capture from YouTube.com

Many big league ballplayers of today leave the game in their mid or late 30s.  A lot of them spend their retirement years someplace warm and often around baseball, either in the professional or, sometimes, at the collegiate level.

Macmillan Publishers

Major changes happened in the world of baseball just after World War II, representing a unique period in the sport's history. Seasons were tenuous during the war. Hundreds of ballplayers left their teams to join the military and were replaced by players who were ineligible to fight, or whose better playing days were behind them.

Kari / Flickr

Political analysts describe Wisconsin as purple – neither liberalism’s traditional blue, nor conservatism’s typical red.  The state’s deep political divides are well-documented, but often in terms of political party or philosophy.

A Wisconsin researcher is looking at a divide of a different kind. Kathy Cramer, a political science professor at UW-Madison, has been researching the rural-urban gap and how it affects Wisconsin politics.

Lauren Fox / laurenfoxwriter.com

Lauren Fox's third novel, Days of Awe, is a first person narrative that sends it's protagonist, Isabel, on a very difficult journey.

Throughout the course of a year, the character loses her best friend and her marriage. Isabel also metaphorically loses her daughter, a fairly typical teenager with the mood swings.

bus
Michelle Maternowski

Opponents of the downtown Milwaukee streetcar project said they're launching a petition drive to block any potential expansion of the project. That word came after a previous drive fell short of its goal, amid questions over whether it would have carried any legal weight.

Even with plans for the first phase of the streetcar moving forward, many supporters say the project really only represents the tip of the iceberg when it comes to addressing the challenges of transit in the Milwaukee area.

Pages