Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

liamcallanan.com

If there are any themes that fiction readers have warmed to in recent years, they would include Paris and bookshops.  Sometimes, bookshops in Paris. But none of them have woven Milwaukee into that mix - until now. 

Wisconsin novelist Liam Callanan’s new novel features a Milwaukee woman married to a writer who suddenly goes missing.  She and her two adolescent children go looking for him in a journey that leads them to buy a bookshop in Paris.

Susan Bence

An independent survey released earlier this month indicated that most Milwaukee residents are somewhat, or very, satisfied with police.

Yet many people, especially minorities, view the police through a lens of frustration, anger, or even fear. The city could be at a pivotal juncture, however, with last month's retirement of longtime Police Chief Edward Flynn, and the eventual installation of a new leader.

Michelle Maternowski

For this episode of the Pretzel Podcast, Mitch and Michelle look back through the dusty recesses of their minds to recall some of their earliest pretzel memories - plus they put those pretzels to the Crunch Time taste test. And, sportswriter and guest pretzel memoirist Steve Rushin talks about the pretzel sticks and pretzel rods of his Minnesota childhood.

50 Miles More

This post has been updated.

A week after the national school walkout, some Wisconsin students went the extra mile, or this case - 50 miles, to protest gun violence. The students wrapped up a four-day, 50-mile march from Madison to Janesville Wednesday, following last weekend's nationwide March For Our Lives rallies.  And the organizers say their work isn't done, even if the march is.

Katie Eder says gun violence isn't a political issue; but rather, students are literally fighting for their lives.

Mitch Teich

For a lot of us, the week leading up to Easter is a time to slow down.  Some might see it as a period to contemplate their faith, or simply enjoy the chance to spend time with family.  But the days leading up to Easter are anything but slow if you're Jim Niemann.

ChiccoDodiFC / Fotolia

Milwaukeeans looking for solutions to a tense climate between communities and the police force could look to the city of Cincinnati as an example. The area's population is comparable to Milwaukee, and has dealt with many of the same issues of mistrust between law enforcement and minority communities. 

But years of work in Cincinnati has led to a different climate. Their model for change is one that a group called the Community Coalition for Quality Policing would like to see implemented in Milwaukee.

(vincent desjardins) / Flickr

The work of police departments around the country has been under particular scrutiny in the last year. Some high profile shootings by police – and of police - have strained the relationship between some departments and the communities they are sworn to protect. 

Department of Commerce collection

Lawrence Baldassaro had been interviewing baseball players of Italian-American heritage for a while when a realization hit him.  "Here I am," he recalled thinking, "the grandson of four Italian immigrants, I teach Italian, I love baseball - why don't I write about Italians in baseball?

"It turned out that virtually nothing had been written about that subject," Baldassaro says.

WUWM's latest Project Milwaukee series, To Protect and Serve, airs March 26-30.  It will focus on relations between law enforcement and the community it is sworn to protect, at a time of major transition.  We preview the series with two of the people that helped shape it - Ann-Elise Henzl, WUWM News director and Audrey Nowakowski, Lake Effect producer and Project Milwaukee co-executive producer.

Alec Soth / Courtesy of Magnum Photos

The Milwaukee Art Museum's current photography exhibit, The Open Road, features the works of many groundbreaking international photographers who were enamored with the idea of the Great American Road Trip. But there are American photographers, as well, who have the ability to show the country to their fellow Americans in a different way.

ustas / Fotolia

When you get a cold, or the flu, or other viral illnesses, your immune system adapts to keep you from getting that particular strain of illness again. So, too, with vaccines, which essentially train your body to fight off infection from the virus or bacterium they’re designed to protect you from.

Except your immune system doesn’t always cooperate. Some vaccines need booster shots over time, and some people - especially the elderly - are susceptible to diseases they would not have caught at another time in their life. So what’s going on here?

PunkToad / Flickr

Leadership in Milwaukee - at one level - has been pretty consistent for a long time. Since 1948, the city of Milwaukee has had only five mayors.

Four of them - Frank Zeidler, Henry Maier, John Norquist, and Tom Barrett - have spent nearly 70 years in office.

There has been much more turnover on the Common Council - and the presidency of the Council.  One person who has experienced both is Marvin Pratt, who served as mayor in the four months between John Norquist’s resignation and Tom Barrett’s election, and was common council president from 2000-2004.

Alex Wong / Getty Images News

Dissent came quickly this week within the Republican Party after President Trump fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and announced he wished to appoint C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo to the top diplomatic post.  Republican Senator Rand Paul announced he would oppose that appointment, as well as that of Gina Haspel, who Trump named as his choice to lead the C.I.A..  Republicans hold the narrowest of margins in the Senate, so Paul’s objections could place the appointment in peril.

Sporting News Archives

Steve Rushin has covered thousands of professional and college athletes in his decades as a sportswriter and columnist.  But these days, he's spending a lot of time watching amateur athletes at work - his kids, as they play youth and high school basketball.  And Rushin has taken particular note of the fans around him.

Tony Kushner's 1993 play, Angels in America, is an angry, sprawling meditation on gay life at the height of the AIDS crisis. It won Tony Awards, the Pulitzer Prize, and it gave the world a new vocabulary with which to discuss being gay in America.

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