Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

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During the Presidential campaign and in the weeks following Donald Trump's election last fall, actor Alec Baldwin was responsible for the definitive - satirical - impression of the incoming President.  Baldwin's Trump routines on NBC's "Saturday Night Live" made headlines for poking fun at the headlines the President-elect himself was making.

tab62 / Fotolia

President Trump vowed a repeal of the Affordable Care Act throughout his campaign and one of his first moves as president was seen as the initial step toward that campaign promise. But healthcare has fallen out of the headlines in the days since then, replaced by other issues.

John O'Hara

Barbara Gensler, a legend in the local scholastic theater scene, has died.

According to her obituary in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Barbara Gensler passed away on January 30, 2017 at the age of 81.

Gensler was featured in WUWM's Life's Voices series in 2012 for her work in the community:

As well as on Lake Effect:

 Original post from May 15, 2012:

John Glaser/Cal Sport Media / Flickr

 

For sports fans, it’s a big weekend. And it’s also a big weekend for people who enjoy expensive TV ad campaigns. That must mean Super Bowl Sunday is rapidly approaching. The fifty-first edition of the proverbial big game pits the Atlanta Falcons against the New England Patriots.

For Packers fans, it’s a rough time, as we are again denied the opportunity to watch Aaron Rodgers square off against Tom Brady on the world stage. Sports contributor Shaun Ranft is going to watch the game anyway to see how this year's Super Bowl storylines will unfold.

Even if you are entirely happy with the state of world affairs circa 2017, the idea of disappearing can be alluring - especially in the midst of a Wisconsin winter. But the disappearance at the heart of novelist Idra Novey’s new book extends beyond that romantic notion of disappearing for a while.

Antonio Zugaldia / Flickr

For the last 25 years, The Onion has been the satirical newspaper of record. But as the lines between real and fake news are blurrier than ever, does that mean the end of satire? The paper's founding editor, Scott Dikkers, says this is an age-old question.

Courtesy Quad/Graphics

Super Bowl 51 will kick off on Sunday in Houston.  Many football fans here in Wisconsin are still miffed that it will be the Atlanta Falcons, and not the Green Bay Packers, representing the NFC in the game against the New England Patriots.

But Wisconsin will be represented in its own way in the stadium, and in the homes of hundreds of thousands of football fans around the world.  This year’s physical Super Bowl game program was printed in Lomira, Wisconsin, by Quad/Graphics.

Ron Sachs - Pool/Getty Images

Forget the first hundred days. The first hundred hours of the Trump Administration are without parallel in recent memory. From immigration policy to trade, our place in the modern world seems to be evolving rather quickly.

One thing that hasn’t changed is the analytical eye of our foreign policy contributor. The always level-headed Art Cyr joins Lake Effect to chat.

Mike Mangione

Milwaukee-area musician Mike Mangione's podcast, called Time & The Mystery, is described as a series of artist-to-artist conversations with musicians, actors, comedians and others about the philosophy behind what they do and how they connect with their audience.

Jean-Pierre Dalbéra / Flickr

In December of 1984, a pesticide plant owned by Union Carbide leaked poisonous gas and chemicals into the environment in and around Bhopal, India. The Indian government’s figures show the disaster killed more than 3,000 people and injured more than 500,000.

Mitch Teich

Just north of the BMO Harris Bradley Center, a massive superstructure is rising from an open field. The city’s new sports arena currently under construction is scheduled for completion in 2018, and will be the new home for the Milwaukee Bucks, who have been based at the Bradley Center since 1985. 

Many Faces, One Humanity / facebook.com

An election season often brings to the fore the issues that divide the country, but a Milwaukee organization - while not taking on politics directly - is looking for the things that connect us.

Istimages / Fotolia

It’s easy to type a word into Google and get a brief definition. However, using a physical dictionary is an entirely different experience. 

Steve Kleinedler can relate to both the online and the physical experiences as the editor of the American Heritage Dictionary, which recently issued its fifth edition with more than 400 heretofore undefined words. 

Photo courtesy of Department of Special Collections and University Archives, Marquette University Libraries

Dick Enberg retired last fall from a sixty-year career as a sports broadcaster.  In that time, he covered eight Super Bowls, tennis's Grand Slam events, and thousands of baseball and basketball games.  Enberg worked with scores of fellow broadcasters, from Merlin Olsen to Joe Morgan to Bud Collins.  But of all the people he shared a broadcast booth, one rises to the top.

Loozrboy / Flickr

The proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline project and the protests against it got a lot of international media attention for what its backers said it would do, and what opponents feared it would do.

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