Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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In many respects, Milwaukee attorney Robert Habush's career has been incredibly successful. 

Habush has represented clients in some of the most high-profile lawsuits in Wisconsin history - from the collapse of the crane that killed workers building Miller Park to suits against Big Tobacco.

Habush’s career – and his personal story - are the subject of a new biography, titled Courtroom Avenger: The Challenges and Triumphs of Robert Habush, by Milwaukee writer Kurt Chandler.

yaquina, flickr

As temperatures hover in the low 60s downtown throughout this summer with only a few warm days, there were some people who theorized that maybe we skipped summer altogether and jumped straight from spring to fall.

That might be cause for concern if you have a garden growing – we’d hate to have a killing frost in August this year.  Fortunately, that probably won’t happen.  But the temperature swings are a concern for Lake Effect's gardening contributor, Melinda Myers.

Terra Guitarra

Depending on when and where you see musicians Julie Patchouli and Bruce Hecksel, they might be playing under the name Patchouli or they might be called Terra Guitarra. The multi-instrumentalists call western Wisconsin home, but they’ve toured nearly non-stop for sixteen years.

Fotolia, niyazz

As the Wisconsin State Assembly takes up the proposed state budget today, the Senate passed the budget by an 18-15 vote late last night. The substantial last-minute additions to the budget bill, called Motion 999, last Thursday led to an uproar on both sides of the aisle for its proposal to overhaul the state’s open records law.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A few weeks have passed since the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a key part of the Affordable Care Act. The court’s decision affirmed the legality of subsidies the government provides to make health insurance more affordable.

It’s the latest legal hurdle the five-year-old law has cleared, however, questions still remain about how the latest ruling will be felt in places like Wisconsin, and about what the future holds for the healthcare landscape.

Mitch Teich

When Al Exner looks back at his grandkids today, he’s shocked at how different their experience as 18-year-olds is from what he experienced when he was their age.

Homeandgardners / Flickr

A Milwaukee researcher was one of the key figures behind a landmark report on treating cardiac arrest in the United States.

Doctor Tom Aufderheide is a professor of emergency medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin and was on the steering committee for the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine report on cardiac arrest. The report, called Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act, was released yesterday.

For some reason, love stories in books and movies almost always deal with people aged 16 to 34 years old. The young and the beautiful. That 35 and up group is usually there for comedic relief.

This is not the case for writer Emma Hooper's new book. She wrote a story to challenge that stigma.

"We don't stop having desires, dreams or motivations once we turn thirty five. We don't have everything figured out either," Hooper says.

Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

After being the Wisconsin Badgers basketball coach for the last 14 years, Bo Ryan announced he will be retiring after next season.

Ryan lead the Badgers through multiple final fours, championship games and has even brought through some first round draft picks.

Although UW-Milwaukee's Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health is still in its fledgling stages, the school has already begun to make a difference.

Now the school is starting the process of looking for new leadership. After leading the school through its formative years, founding Dean Magda Peck is stepping down July 1. 

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