Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Bridie Farrell / facebook.com

A fifth woman came forward this week to accuse Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of making sexual advances at her when she was a teenager.  Both Democrats and some Republicans have pressured Moore to drop out of the race.

wladimir1804 / Fotolia

For State of Wisconsin employees, including employees at UW-Milwaukee, the health insurance open enrollment period brought a lot of questions. Most of the insurance companies who previously offered coverage will no longer do so in 2018.  State employees in the Milwaukee area have only two companies to choose from.

One is the Menasha-based Network Health, which also made the recent decision to remain on the Milwaukee County exchange, despite uncertainty about the Affordable Care Act’s future. 

Chung Sung-Jun / Getty Images

 

President Trump’s trip to Asia continues through the weekend as he addresses trade and economic links with world powerhouses such as China, even as Republicans back in the United States debate the tax cut measure working its way through the Senate.

Marcus Goldhaber

Thinking about veterans does not have to be limited to Veteran's Day. That's the concept behind New York-based musician Marcus Goldhaber's new album Carry You On.  It’s an album with a unique hook, to get civilians and veterans to have meaningful conversations with each other.

Mitch Teich

For more than 120 years the Milwaukee Soldiers Home served veterans of conflicts from the Civil War through Vietnam. But for the past 28 years, the original 1867 building, called Old Main, has stood vacant, even as it remained an iconic piece of the skyline west of downtown.

Today, the building is closed to the public, and the few visitors who are allowed inside are required to wear hard hats and are offered respirators to guard against the dust, mold, and peeling paint.

Wikimedia Commons

Today is the first Tuesday in November, which is typically the fall election day in this country. A year ago, Donald Trump was elected president, and a year from today, people will go to the polls in Wisconsin to vote in the gubernatorial, Congressional, Senate, and state legislative races.

Sara Stathas

In one year, people around the country will be voting in the midterm elections. Here in Wisconsin, voters will decide whether Scott Walker gets another term as governor, whether Tammy Baldwin continues in the US Senate, and - for voters in the 1st Congressional District - whether Paul Ryan will stay in Congress.

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley / Defense Department/Wikimedia

Lewis Black is angry a lot of the time. At least in public. For the political comedian, that’s part of what people expect of him.

Courtesy of Paul Walter

It’s listener suggestions that inspire the features that make up our weekly Bubbler Talk segment. But Bubbler Talk itself was the inspiration for a student project that played out earlier this year in the community of Slinger.

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Most people aren’t able to say that they work with data from the South Pole, but Justin Vandenbroucke is the exception.

Vandenbroucke is an assistant professor in the physics department at UW-Madison, and specializes in high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. He works with data from the IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory.

"Neutrinos are sub-atomic particles that have no charge, so they’re kind of like neutrons, but they also have very little mass so they’re even less massive than protons and electrons,” he explains.

NASA/COBE Science Team / Wikimedia

John Mather shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2006 for his work with the Cosmic Background Explorer, or COBE. Launched in 1989, the satellite was instrumental in developing our understanding of cosmic microwave background radiation.

So, what is that? 

"The cosmic background is the sort of light and heat that come to us from all directions, way out there from the distant universe. So not coming from objects, but from whatever is really, way farther beyond that," Mather explains. 

norajanestruthers.com

Nora Jane Struthers has made a pretty big splash with her latest album. Champion earned a glowing review from rock critic Ken Tucker on Fresh Air recently, and the record got its streaming debut through the NPR website.

Audrey Nowakowski

For the inaugural Lake Effect On-Site, the team headed to the Rafters Room at Three Cellars in Oak Creek. The conversation focused on this southern Milwaukee County community's rapid growth. 

Looking around modern Oak Creek, the huge developments taking place would have come as a surprise to the people who called the area home a hundred years ago. In fact, Oak Creek wasn’t even incorporated as a city until the 1950s.

Photo by Win McNamee / Getty Images

Politicians of all stripes are reacting to the latest schism in the Republican Party. Arizona Senator Jeff Flake - an outspoken critic of President Trump - announced he won’t seek reelection next year. And in doing so, he became even more outspoken in his criticism of the President and what he believes Trump represents.

Courtesy Randex Communications

There were many contemporary western musicians who performed with South African artists, especially as Apartheid was winding down in the late 1980s.

But musicians like Paul Simon and Peter Gabriel never went to jail for playing with those artists.  Johnny Clegg did.  Clegg moved to South Africa as a boy in the late 1960s and was attracted to the culture and tunes of Zulu street musicians in Johannesburg.  That was not legal in those days, but it didn’t deter him. 

Pages