Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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Mitch Teich

The rise of actor Rainn Wilson to prominence should provide some comfort to awkward adolescents everywhere.  Wilson was a bassoonist, Dungeon-and-Dragons playing nerdy kid in Seattle before being nerdy was cool.

A move to the Chicago area in high school allowed him to break out of his earlier mold and pursue theater ( though he kept up with the bassoon).  While it didn’t happen overnight, Wilson connected with acting, and with comedy, and the most visible result was his character, the intense Dwight Schrute, on the long-running NBC comedy, “The Office.”

Kenneth Sponsler, fotolia

The Harley-Davidson Museum is devoted to one of the icons of the open road.  But the museum was taken over for a sold-out celebration of the form of transportation that has been irrevocably altered by the open road.

Waukesha-based Trains magazine marks its 75th anniversary this month.  But when Kalmbach publishing launched it, trains occupied a much different place in American culture.  The magazine has chronicled the seismic shifts in the past three-quarters of a century.

Streeter Lecka / Flickr

The Green Bay Packers return home this weekend for a game against the Detroit Lions.  The game couldn’t come at a better time for the Packers who just lost two road games in a row, and in convincing fashion.

There’s more than a little angst in Packer Nation at the moment, and sports contributor Howie Magner thinks it may be a bit of an over-reaction from fans.

"Suddenly, people are wondering if they are going to make the playoffs, or if they need to fire everybody.  Or whether they should trade Aaron Rodgers, which is all kind of silly," he says.

Beth Cortez-Neavel / Flickr

WUWM's Project Milwaukee series last year on the issue of the incarceration rate among African-American men in Milwaukee pointed to the apparent disparities in traffic stops and other citations.  These encounters with the law often result in offenders ending up back in prison.

County Executive Chris Abele /

The Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors this week passed an amended budget for the coming fiscal year.  The changes were made to what was proposed by County Executive Chris Abele. 

The new document has some key similarities to what Abele proposed but also some major differences.  Abele is expected to make vetoes of parts in the coming days, and the County Board will follow with a meeting at which the vetoes can be overridden.

Gruber Law Offices /

It’s tough to watch local television, or listen to commercial radio, or drive on the highway without encountering an ad for a personal injury law firm.

In Milwaukee, there’s one set of commercials that is especially ubiquitous:


Or maybe you’ve seen it in Spanish:

Mitch Teich

Way back when, the R&B Cadets were poised to hit it big coming out of the Milwaukee music scene.  The group played infectious music, had a loyal following, and drew thousands to their live shows.

But the Cadets came to a halt when John Sieger’s other musical effort, Semi-Twang, was signed to a major label.  The sudden end initially led to some friction among the members, but thirty years later, that friction is essentially ancient history.

Mitch Teich

When Al Exner looks back at his grandkids today, he’s shocked at how different their experience as 18-year-olds is from what he experienced when he was their age.

Serve Marketing /

Not long ago, the effort to reduce the number of teenage pregnancies in Milwaukee was seen as a resounding success.  The rate dropped 56% between 2006 and 2013.

But last month, the latest statistics showed the rate climbed slightly - around 1% - in the past 12 months.  Almost 24 of every 1,000 girls in Milwaukee between 15 or 17 years old gave birth to a child last year. A new public service campaign has taken a different approach to the issue.  It addresses parents who, themselves, had children at a young age. 

Mitch Teich

For more than two decades, Milwaukee’s Wisconsin Lutheran High School has held a service to honor veterans on Veterans Day.  The service typically introduces students to someone who has served in some capacity in the armed forces, and this year’s honored speaker has a unique story to tell.

Lieutenant Colonel Henry Ratenski served in what was then the Army Air Force at the end of World War II...the very end.