Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

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As the stock markets opened today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was running at just over 19,885.  If things go especially well today, it could very well finish over the 20,000 mark for the first time in history. 

This may seem monumental, but award-winning Washington Post financial columnist and Marketplace Morning Report contributor Allan Sloan says not to get too excited.

T. Krueger / WPR

Last week, Milwaukee was one of four cities nationwide that participated in NPR's A Nation Engaged project.  The idea behind the project was to gather together citizens to ask them what they wanted the incoming Presidential administration to know about their towns and cities.

Milwaukee’s event was moderated by NPR’s National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea, who stressed the importance of events that bring reporters into the field, particularly in swing states like Wisconsin. 

Earlier this week, Milwaukee Magazine and Lake Effect kicked off a new, monthly live conversation series. This month’s MilMag Live! event focused on two topics. The first of those was the influence of insiders and outsiders in shaping Milwaukee.

The discussion was led by Lake Effect's Mitch Teich and Carole Nicksin from Milwaukee Magazine. One of the areas of richest discussion was what brings people to Milwaukee, and what drives them away. 

The panel included: 

Much of writer Emily Fridlund’s new novel, A History of Wolves, plays out in a remote part of a lonely town in northern Minnesota. But anyone who reads it could probably substitute the north woods of Wisconsin as an appropriate image.

Check cashing stores and payday loan centers have a checkered reputation, to put it mildly. Critics say their high interest rates and fees take advantage of people who are already financially disadvantaged. But the truth is, these alternative financial systems are proliferating in Wisconsin and around the country.

Writer Lisa Servon wondered why. Servon is a professor of city and regional planning at the University of Pennsylvania and her new book is called The Unbanking of America: How the New Middle Class Survives.

Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

Chances are that even if you have never attended a local pro wrestling meet, an idea of what one looks like probably comes to mind. You might imagine a tightly packed room in a small arena or community center.  You might think of the sounds, or even the smells that inhabit the space - sweat, beer, hot dogs.

http://jackieevancho.com/photo-album/official-photos/

Update:

While most Presidential inaugurations feature performances from high-profile musicians, the upcoming Trump inauguration has thus far been notable for not having such performances booked.

To date, the only solo performer confirmed to perform is 16-year-old Jackie Evancho, who will sing the National Anthem.

After a couple trips to Norway, Wisconsin writer Sandy Brehl knew she wanted to write a story about the Nazi's occupation of the country.

"I was sure that Norway had been neutral, the way Sweden was or Switzerland was, and it turns out that wasn't the case at all. And their stories just were so embedded with national pride and resilience and humor," says Brehl. "The humor particularly struck me, and I came away knowing that I'd want to write those stories."

When The Snowy Day was first published in 1962, it was a bit unusual. The now classic children's picture book was one of the very few at the time to feature an African-American child as its main character. 

Mike Morbeck / Flickr

The arctic weather outbreak is expected to stick around through the weekend in Milwaukee, which gives football fans here a good excuse to stay indoors on Sunday afternoon - though most of them weren't really looking for an excuse, anyway.

Although the season got off to a rocky start, the Packers are now winners of six in a row. The team will be in the marquee playoff game of the weekend, taking on the New York Giants late Sunday afternoon. But despite their recent successes, sports contributor Shaun Ranft's outlook isn't necessarily rosy.

Milwaukee Magazine is coming to the stage this Monday, in the first of a series of monthly opportunities to catch some lively conversation and music. 

Monkey Business / Fotolia

When you think back on your childhood, what did dinnertime look like? Many of us might think back on meals eaten around the kitchen or dining room table in idyllic terms: good food, conversation and togetherness. While the reality might have been a little more nuanced, there was a time when the family meal was a pretty typical shared experience in America.

Leaders at a medical center in Beaver Dam are leading communities in Dodge County in a multi-year effort to be happier and healthier. 

It's the first Wisconsin site for an international initiative called the Blue Zones Project. The project aims to help communities make healthier choices by making them more accessible.

pathdoc / Fotolia

Obesity is an issue that drives many resolutions each year. And while some who deal with it have underlying medical conditions that are to blame, for many more of us, it’s the way we eat. And for many of us, resolutions, diet and exercise may well only represent a temporary change.

(Photo by Allen Kee / ESPN Images)

The cable sports giant, ESPN, announced in October that it will soon launch a "reimagined version" of the network's signature show, the 5:00PM (Central time) broadcast of SportsCenter.  In the hosts' chairs will be Jemele Hill and Michael Smith, currently co-hosts of "His & Hers" on sister network, ESPN2.

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