Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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One published collection into her career, Milwaukee poet Jaimee Hills is an award-winner.

Hills’s new book is called How to Avoid Speaking, and it’s the recipient of the 10th Anthony Hecht Poetry Prize.  The poems have a little something for everyone, in terms of style, tone, form, and subject matter. 

Morgan / Flickr

The White House issued its first-ever college scorecard this week.  It’s a website designed to help people compare costs and offerings across all the public and private colleges and universities in the country.  It’s a tool that its designers hope will be useful in connecting schools with their future students.

Oneterry Aka Terry Kearney / Flickr

Milwaukee author Lauren Fox’s latest novel that came out over the summer is called Days of Awe, which she told Lake Effect about in a recent interview (included in audio below).

The effort to build a new downtown arena for the Milwaukee Bucks took another step forward last week.  

County Executive Chris Abele announced the sale of Park East land near the current BMO Harris Bradley Center to the Bucks to make way for a practice facility.  A detail in the state budget bill that passed this year removed the county board from overseeing that land sale. Meanwhile, the Milwaukee Common Council will vote later this month on the city’s contribution to the public financing of the arena. 

Matthew Simmons / Getty Images

At first blush, The Wizard of Oz and Bethesda Lutheran Communities wouldn’t seem to have much in common.  One is a beloved, classic movie; the other is an organization that supports developmentally disabled adults.  But what they do have in common is Meinhardt Raabe.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

The Green Bay Packers open their 2015 season with a game in Chicago against the arch-rival Chicago Bears, amid the usual high expectations for the Green and Gold.

Lake Effect sports contributor Howie Magner is not sure whether those high expectations are likely to be met this season. 

"There are players on the defensive side of the ball that can make game-winning plays, but as a whole (if you're a Packers fan), what you want is the defense to be good enough," says Magner.

Steven Depolo / Flickr

The Wisconsin healthcare landscape is a crowded one.  A number of mergers and alliances have formed over recent years, with several major systems now dominating patient care in the Milwaukee area.

Jeff Swensen / Getty Images

While the large field of Republican candidates for President is grabbing most of the headlines, it will be one of the Democratic hopefuls making a case to voters in Milwaukee today. Hillary Clinton, the former Secretary of State, former U.S. Senator and former First Lady, will speak at an event at UW-Milwaukee late this afternoon.

Macmillan Publishers

Regardless of your personal history, most people can agree that sixth, seventh and eighth grades are a pivotal period in a child’s life – the middle grades between adolescence and young adulthood. And the new middle grade novel by Milwaukee area native Jane Kelley has that complicated transition at its heart.

Simon King / Flickr

Last week, the U.S. Labor Department reported that unemployment fell to 5.1 percent, its lowest level in seven years. But that figure only tells part of the story. August was a below-average month for new jobs nationwide, and wages grew at a rate below what the Federal Reserve had hoped for the sake of the economy at large.