Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

One of the major promises Donald Trump made during his presidential campaign was a significant change in the United State's relationship with China - in light of the communist nation's rise to the top of the global economy. Some of Trump’s rhetoric has softened since he took office, and since his meetings with top-level Chinese leaders.

We are a long time removed from the era in which farming represented the majority of southeastern Wisconsin's economy, but there remain many people who make a living on farms in the region.

Writer Anna Blessing highlights compelling stories of farms in Wisconsin and throughout the Midwest in her book, Locally Grown. In her acknowledgements, Blessing described the farmers she met “heroes," who approach their work as a kind of art. 

Wisconsin Historical Society Press

Writer Marnie Mamminga is a Chicago-area native but many of her most touching words are written about her family’s cabin in the northwoods of Wisconsin.

Mamminga’s latest book, On a Clear Night: Essays From the Heartland, is a collection of essays that reminiscences her time in the northwoods as well as other parts of her life.

mikemangione.com

Mike Mangione is a Milwaukee area musician and also the host and producer of the artist-to-artist interview podcast called Time and the Mystery. Mangione appears every month on Lake Effect to discuss an interview he’s done with musicians, actors and other people of note.

Ben Husmann, flickr

Bubbler Talk is supposed to be on its summer break, as we gather more questions and look for more answers to what you’ve always wanted to know about this place we call home. But not long before the hiatus, a question came in that it would be a shame to wait until fall to answer. "Hi, my name is Sarah Richoux, from San Francisco. My question is: Why is frozen custard such a big deal in Milwaukee?"

Image courtesy of the Summit Players

The Milwaukee-based Summit Players will once again bring Shakespeare to Wisconsin's state parks. It’s always an adventure to perform in a new space for any actor, but being outdoors adds its own unique sets of challenges.

One of the biggest challenges the Summit Players face is ensuring their voices are heard during the show. Actor A.J. Magoon shares his past experience competing with Polish Fest that happened to be going on right next door:

Amy Lombard

Lane Moore appreciates dating app blunders so much that she decided to make them happen live in her comedy show, Tinder LIVE! Ahead of Moore’s Friday Turner Hall show in Milwaukee, she joins Lake Effect to discuss how swiping left and right in real-time went from an inside joke to a comedy she says everyone can relate to.

Australian writer Graeme Simsion knows his latest novel isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but he’s OK with the conversations that will come out of it.

The Best of Adam Sharp explores subjects from marriage to infidelity to lost love, while working in some classic rock as well.

“One of the questions I was asking was how far will someone go to save a marriage? And I was also asking about the difference between romantic love and what you might call companionate love,” Simsion says.

HMHBooks / Twitter

Paul Theroux is widely regarded as one of the finest living American writers. But really, he’s a writer of the world. His fifty-year career encompasses travelogues such as The Old Patagonian Express and Deep South, and novels ranging from The Mosquito Coast to Hotel Honolulu.

f11photo / Fotolia

Don’t look now, but we’re already into June and into that fleeting period in Wisconsin known as summer. Maybe you have big plans for the summer - but even the busiest among us have those summer days, or nights, where we’re considering how to spend our time.

"The best part of summer is that it always revives that child-part in us, and here in Milwaukee I think it really does that," says Milwaukee Magazine editor-in-chief Carole Nicksin. 

David Haynes, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel hosted Across the Divide: New Realities for Immigrants, an event at Carroll University in Waukesha. On Monday, May 22, panelists shared their thoughts and experiences with community members about an issue that is as complicated as ever.

Meet the panelists:

Mitch Teich

At the end of another intense news week, Lake Effect news analyst Charlie Sykes marvels at a fast pace cycle, which doesn't seem to slow down.

"We're living in an era," he says, "in which every day, there's a story - a revelation - that in a different world would have dominated the news for weeks in and of itself.  And yet, these are one news-cycle stories."

On Friday's Lake Effect, Sykes offered his take on several key issues that dominated the news (for a while, anyway) this week:

Forbes / Forbes Magazine

Institutions in the U.S. were generally spared the worst of the recent ransomware attack called WannaCry. But there's no guarantee the U.S. won’t bear the brunt of the next cyber-attack that comes along.

DFM Collection / Centre numérique des manuscrits orientaux

The continued depletion of religious diversity in the Middle East could be contributing to the death of one of the oldest living languages, known as Syriac.

The language holds both religious and historical significance, but as political turmoil wreaks havoc in the region, Syriac and its native speakers face an uncertain future. A group of scholars meeting this week at Marquette University is working to preserve both the language and the cultural traditions that accompany it.

Communist Daughter / Facebook.com

"It's the new album until tomorrow." On the last day of their tour, husband and wife musical team Molly and Johnny Solomon of Communist Daughter share exhausted breaths of post-tour pants-less desires and insight into their next project. 

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