Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 27 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time looking for his reading glasses, watching his beloved Boston Red Sox and cheering on his children on the ice rinks, ballfields, and cycling tracks of southeastern Wisconsin.

Ways to Connect

takasu, fotolia

Mother’s Day is Sunday. While it’s a time where we traditionally give thought to the influence our own mothers have had on our lives, a UW-Milwaukee researcher is studying the broader impact of motherhood. 

courtesy Rojon Productions

It's not for us to say, but chances are you're familiar with the wonderful, wonderful voice of Johnny Mathis (and bonus points if you caught all of those song references).  Mathis recorded his first song in 1955, his first album in 1956, and has recorded 78 albums since then.  Most recently, his 1982 album, I Love My Lady, was released for the first time on vinyl - in time for this year's Record Store Day.

Michelle Maternowski / WUWM

Milwaukee County’s Public Safety building is long past the point where it is simply aging. The building was built with a jail inside in 1929. Prisoners were moved to a newer facility more than 25 years ago and the building now mainly houses courtrooms and legal offices.

spotmatikphoto / Fotolia

For nearly a decade, experts have been predicting the nursing shortage. The situation has reached a critical mass here in Milwaukee, with more institutions looking for ways to train more nurses. 

"Nurses are broadening their medical care and interaction with patients in all types of realms, and so that has then increased - even more - the demand for nurses," says Cheryl Bailey, dean of the School of Natural and Health Sciences at Mount Mary University. 

Tim Duggan Books

Wisconsin is currently facing a nursing crisis, but the nursing gap has been building around the world. Christie Watson experienced it in the UK, where she worked as a registered nurse for 20 years before becoming a novelist and pursuing writing full-time.

"People aren't aspiring to be nurses because they don't really understand what the job is because there's not enough out there about the job. And certainly literature and memoirs play a part in that, I think," she notes.

Mitch Teich

The cover art for singer-songwriter Mark Erelli's latest album is a throwback.  It's made out to look like a cassette, with Erelli's last name spelled out in the font that a generation of music listeners will recognize - letters that would have spelled out the tape brand Maxell.

Smith1979 / Fotolia

Many immigrants’ rights supporters implore people to think of immigrants not in terms of nationality or country of origin, but rather, simply as fellow human beings.

Empathy towards other fellow humans is at the heart of Raveen Arora’s message. Arora is a former refugee, who once worked with Mother Teresa and now lives in Arizona and heads the Think Human Global Initiative.

Slate

Note: You can find the full audio from Leon Neyfakh's on-stage interview in Milwaukee at the bottom of this post.

The news these days is filled with stories of high-level leaks, dirty tricks, and a President with a habit of saying things you wouldn't expect to hear from a Chief Executive.

Illustration by Jason Wyatt Frederick / Milwaukee Magazine

Many of us like a good mystery.  The May issue of Milwaukee Magazine is chock-full of real-life mysteries with a decided local flair.  The magazine’s cover story relates a handful of unsolved mysteries and hidden history from around Wisconsin.

From an angry Goatman to underwater pyramids and cheese thefts, "(these stories) sort of percolated through the public consciousness for a long time," says senior editor Matt Hrodey.

Mitch Teich

Imagine going to the Baseball Hall of Fame and knowing nothing about baseball. Or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, having only listened to opera for your whole life. That kind of disconnect is a key challenge the curators of the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee have in front of them when it comes to presenting motorcycle engines.

ipopba / Fotolia

Many businesses and organizations hold courses on administering cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, and how to use an automated external defibrillator, or AED, device. The goal of this training is to have as many people as possible ready to assist in the case of a heart emergency.

And that’s music to the ears of Dr. Ivor Benjamin.

Benjamin is the director of the Cardiovascular Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin. And in July, he will assume the role of president of the American Heart Association.

Michelle Maternowski

Since 2013, a company now based on Milwaukee’s north side has become the go-to baker of authentic Bavarian soft pretzels. The Milwaukee Pretzel Company’s pretzels are found in numerous places - from bars and restaurants, to beer gardens and Bucks games. The company is the creation of husband and wife Matt and Katie Wessel, who fed their love of pretzels while living in Germany for a year.

On this very special National Pretzel Day, Pretzel Podcast hosts Mitch and Michelle take a field trip to the delicious smelling business to learn why things are going so well. 

Mitch Teich

The concept is pretty simple - two wheels, pedals, a chain, and a frame.  But within that basic mix of parts, it turns out there’s a lot of room for art.  Quite a lot of room, actually. Even a basic bike can be a work of art - art that can also take you to work, or down a wooded path.

courtesy Jenny Benjamin

Milwaukee writer Jenny Benjamin transported readers between 21st Century Milwaukee and 18th Century Italy in her 2013 novel, This Most Amazing.  But Benjamin's latest books take readers on a much more intimate trip, into her heart and her mind.  Benjamin is an award-winning poet and frequent poetry contributor to Lake Effect, and has two new collections that are now on shelves.

Tuesday on Lake Effect:

We meet a Marquette graduate who recreated the effort by 18th Century Scottish explorer Alexander Mackenzie, who searched for the elusive Northwest Passage through northern Canada to China.  Later, a lead contamination expert talks about the opportunity she still believes Milwaukee has to respond to the lead crisis here.  And Milwaukee writer and historian Larry Baldassaro shares histories of Italian-American baseball players he's collected from first-hand interviews over the years.

Guests:

Pages