Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 27 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time looking for his reading glasses, watching his beloved Boston Red Sox and cheering on his children on the ice rinks, ballfields, and cycling tracks of southeastern Wisconsin.

Ways to Connect

kwamealexander.com

Kwame Alexander never doubted that there was an audience for his children’s books - sports books written in verse - even though publishers said girls won’t read books about sports and boys wouldn’t read poems.  But eventually, the first of those books, The Crossover, hit the shelves featuring both basketball and poetry.  And it was a smash hit, winning the 2015 Newbery Medal. A soccer book followed, then a book of guiding principles for young lives.

NPR photo

Longtime NPR newscaster and Wait! Wait! Don't Tell Me sidekick Carl Kasell died this week of complications from Alzheimer's disease.  He was 84 years old.  On today's show, we revisit our 2012 interview with him, recorded while he was in town recording an episode of the comedy quiz show.

kjekol / Fotolia

A series in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and other USA Today Network newspapers around Wisconsin is looking at the impact of mental health issues on kids and teens in the state. 

The series, titled Kids in Crisis - and its accompanying podcast, This Is Normal, features personal stories from young people who have gone through significant emotional challenges.

Wauwatosa writer Tom Matthews was inspired by a dream to write his latest novel, Raising the Dad. When Matthews was 10-years-old, his father died. Years later, he had a dream where a close family friend told him his father was still alive, but due to the massive trauma, his father's personality had changed. The book explores how the protagonist and other family members process that development.

Bonnie North

Milwaukee band Various Small Fires performed in, and outside of, our studio recently. This is their original tune Shine:

The band plays a full set at The Up and Under Pub Saturday night during the Battle of the Bands competition. The award is a place on the 2018 Summerfest lineup.

How would you react if a member of your family suddenly died, and then you realized they didn’t?

That’s the conundrum faced by members of the family at the heart of Wisconsin writer Rebecca L. Brown’s new novel, Flying At Night. The book tells the story of a Madison woman named Piper; her son, Fred; and her very difficult father, Lance.

Brown joins Lake Effect's Mitch Teich to talk about her new novel, ahead of an event at Boswell Book Company.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

The latest in a seemingly endless series of political earthquakes shook the country Wednesday, when Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wisconsin announced he will not seek re-election. There had long been rumors that he would retire in the next year or so, but Ryan’s announcement stunned both Republicans and Democrats.

The decision comes during a difficult period for Republican officeholders, as Democrats have won special elections and statewide races for seats that had previously been seen as safely in the hands of the GOP.

courtesy Paul Noth

Cartoonist and Milwaukee native Paul Noth has typically created work for older audiences - animated shorts on "Saturday Night Live," a short video series with Jim Gaffigan and Conan O'Brien, cartoons in The New Yorker and The Wall Street Journal.  But his latest work is the first in a trilogy of books for middle-grade readers, called How To Sell Your Family to the Aliens.

Noth returned to Milwaukee to share the story of his journey from Rufus King High School to the many creative outlets that fill his professional career.

Mitch Teich

On last week's Bubbler Talk, we visited the library at the Milwaukee County Zoo to learn whether visitors to the zoo, years ago, were really allowed to feed marshmallows to the polar bears (and other animals).  Turns out, the answer was yes.

But a question emerged from that story: Why the heck does the Milwaukee County Zoo have a library, anyway? 

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Police Department

Update:

On Thursday, the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission announced Alfonso Morales will serve as police chief through January 2020.

This is when former Police Chief Edward Flynn's term would have ended. Flynn retired in February and the commission then appointed Morales to serve as interim chief.

Original post, March 27:

Mitch Teich

When was the last time you went to the Milwaukee County Zoo? Did you see the polar bear? You didn't feed it anything, right? Well, Bubbler Talk question asker Jessica Ols has been wondering about her trips to the zoo in the early 1980s...

Birds Of Chicago Previews New Album 'Love In Wartime'

Apr 4, 2018
Mayaan Silver

They’re called Birds of Chicago, but there’s a lot of geography in the group led by Allison Russell and JT Nero. Russell is a Montreal native, the couple lives in Nashville, and they are honorary Milwaukeeans - JT’s family lives here and they spend plenty of time in the area. 

Courtesy of Milwaukee Magazine

Regular readers of Milwaukee Magazine may notice the monthly publication has been looking a bit different. A couple months ago, the magazine made some changes to both the design of the physical magazine and the content.

The changes also came with an additional title for Milwaukee Magazine Editor-in-Chief Carole Nicksin, who sat down with  Lake Effect's Mitch Teich to talk about the design changes and her additional title: Publisher.

Shorewood Public Library

The idea of community-wide common reads has been gaining steam in recent years. Several Milwaukee area schools - and towns - have organized months- or year-long efforts to get people together to read the same book.

In Shorewood, a successful effort a few years ago with Wisconsin writer Nick Butler’s Shotgun Lovesongs led to another ambitious effort. This year, Shorewood Reads takes on the post-apocalyptic Station Eleven, by Emily St. John Mandel. 

http://www.emilymandel.com

The vision of the end of civilization in Emily St. John Mandel’s new novel would be chilling enough – a fast-moving plague from overseas wipes out nearly everyone it touches – even without the real-life Ebola outbreak killing people in Africa.

Her novel, Station Eleven, jumps back and forth between the time leading up to the deadly flu outbreak, and the time after, in which as much as 99 percent of the population is killed.

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