Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

John Sturdy

The October issue of Milwaukee Magazine is its annual “Best Of” issue, and it features some of the highlights of the city in areas ranging from the familiar, like "Best Taco" to the lesser known titles, like "Best Boozy Art Class."

Managing the whole operation is the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Carole Nicksin, who says the annual "Best of," is one of her favorites. 

In the late 1970s and early '80s, Steve Martin was the most famous stand-up comedian in America.  Martin's albums, such as "Comedy Is Not Pretty" and "Wild and Crazy Guy" sold millions of copies and helped launch a career that went on to movies, novels, and stage plays.  But along the way, Martin lost his love for performing on stage in front of an audience.

courtesy Max Weinberg

Forty-two years ago this week, Bruce Springsteen played a concert at the Uptown Theater on Milwaukee’s west side.  The theater is long gone, but that show is remembered by many in Milwaukee, because it was stopped by a bomb scare, and then re-started, hours later.

Dennis Andersen

Folk singer Arlo Guthrie doesn't mind if "Alice's Restaurant" is still the first thing that pops to mind when you hear his name.  Guthrie doesn't play it at every show - in fact, he's not planning to play it in Milwaukee Friday night.  But he understands that his fans' love for a fifty-year-old song is as much about themselves as it is about the songwriter.

Photo by Damon Dahlen Scheleur / Huff Post/facebook.com

Since the 2016 campaign, a lot of us in the media have been trying to figure out exactly what’s on the mind of the American people, and how we got to this point.  There have been a lot of polls taken, a lot of surveys analyzed.

Douglas Sonders/NPR

The Hidden Brain is about to become a little more front and center.  The Morning Edition segment-turned-podcast makes its debut as a weekly radio show this weekend on NPR stations (including WUWM).

Simon & Schuster

If the new middle-grade novel, The Explorer, feels like a product of another era, maybe that makes sense, because its author Katherine Rundell could be from another era as well.  Despite her fairly young age, Rundell has four novels under her belt, writes screenplays and plays, not to mention proficiency at walking a tightrope, has experience as a bush pilot, and is a fello

Petrovich12 / Fotolia

The complicated clean up from Hurricanes Maria and Harvey continues. Millions are without power or fresh water, especially in the US commonwealth of Puerto Rico and in the United States Virgin Islands.

One of the assertions we often hear in recent years when a powerful hurricane strikes is that while climate change likely impacts the frequency and severity of major storms, we can’t connect any particular storm to the phenomenon of global warming. George Stone is a former natural sciences instructor at Milwaukee Area Technical College and he says that assertion is wrong. 

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Supporters of independence in Spain's northeastern Catalonia region have taken to the streets, blocking roads and calling for a general strike to protest a crackdown by the country's central government.  The regional government has backed the the strike effort, which came after a contested independence referendum.  The Spanish government opposed the vote and police in some areas fought with citizens who were trying to cast ballots.

Milwaukee Bucks

The professional basketball season is still weeks off, but one of the most visible building projects in Milwaukee has people thinking about basketball year-round.

The new arena for the Milwaukee Bucks is due to open in time for the 2018-2019 season. But people involved in the project say that the progress goes beyond finding a place for pro athletes to play basketball.

Mitch Teich

Donald Trump grabs worldwide headlines, it seems, every time he sends a message into the Twitterverse, whether it's about North Korea, or the National Anthem protests by professional athletes.  Wisconsin writer John Nichols says that while those stories have importance, there are equally important stories involving members of the Trump Administration that are going underreported.

elenabsl / Fotolia

The clock is ticking for Republican Congressional leaders hoping to pass healthcare reform legislation as part of the budget reconciliation process. September 30th is the deadline for a measure to pass the Senate with a simple majority. Earlier this week, a bipartisan effort to offer changes reportedly stalled. Taking its place was a measure cosponsored by Senators Cassidy and Graham. But that bill faces opposition from governors on both sides of the aisle, and its future is uncertain.

Michelle Maternowski

Since its founding seven years ago, Doors Open has become a can’t-miss Milwaukee event. The fall weekend-long event offers people a chance to see places that are often off-limits to the general public, as well as showcases buildings, businesses, and even neighborhoods in a different light.

Will Durst is back home this weekend. The political writer and comedian from Milwaukee lives in the Bay Area today, but has shows this Friday and Saturday at Comedy Sportz in Walker’s Point.

His show, Durst Case Scenario, explores America in the time of President Trump.  Normally, Durst says, the year after an election is a time when people are ready for a break from political comedy.  But not this year, he says. 

Award-winning science writer Mary Roach has taken on some delicate topics with both depth and a large dose of humor in her seven books.  She wrote about human cadavers in Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers; the afterlife in Spook, Science Tackles the Afterlife, and even sexuality in Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Scien

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