Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Macmillan Publishers

Many new parents know first hand the physical impact having a child can have on a woman's body, but a recent book by Julie Halpern looks at the bigger – and often funnier - picture of how childbirth impacts a fictitious new mother.

Jabril Faraj, Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Last year, the Milwaukee Common Council adopted an ordinance regulating where convicted sex offenders are and are not allowed to live within the city limits.

And while the law might give comfort to some who are concerned about whether such offenders are living in close proximity to places like schools, a report in the online Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service says we may actually, now, have less idea where offenders are living. 

stewart-onan.com

It was on this date, exactly 90 years ago that one of the classics of American literature was published. The Great Gatsby cemented the place of F. Scott Fitzgerald in the American literary tradition, and helped make a celebrity of Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda.

Adam Kuban / Flickr

For some of us, it’s hard to imagine a more perfect food than pizza. 

People can be pretty choosy about what is on it and where they get it. If you’re open to trying someplace different than your normal standby, Milwaukee Magazine’s cover story features thirty of the area’s best pizza places.

Courtesy of George Stone

The agreement reached at the Paris conference on climate change called COP21 happened with an unusually warm December in the background.  In Wisconsin, the run of high temperatures and prolific rains has extended into this week.  And while some attribute the weather to the well-known El Nino pattern, many say that it has been enhanced by the effects of climate change.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The case of John Zera has confounded law enforcement since the 14-year old was found murdered in Whitnall Park in the winter of 1976.  But a seven-part weekly series in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has cast new light and brought new attention to the case.

The final installment of the Unsolved series runs Wednesday. 

Serve Marketing / facebook.com

Not long ago, the effort to reduce the number of teenage pregnancies in Milwaukee was seen as a resounding success.  The rate dropped 56% between 2006 and 2013.

But last month, the latest statistics showed the rate climbed slightly - around 1% - in the past 12 months.  Almost 24 of every 1,000 girls in Milwaukee between 15 or 17 years old gave birth to a child last year. A new public service campaign has taken a different approach to the issue.  It addresses parents who, themselves, had children at a young age. 

One World Publications

It used to be that medicine was carried out with a certain degree of secrecy. We turned our health over to the experts and they prescribed what was right for us.

However, more recently patients are demanding doctors who are better communicators. And the Internet age has accelerated that trend - we have more insight into medicine than ever. 

Mitch Teich

It came as a big shock to many over the summer when the Milwaukee Public Museum announced it was closing and renovating the museum’s beloved Streets of Old Milwaukee exhibit. But the truth was the streets were indeed old. The new and improved exhibit still highlights local business, but new themes with new characters will give visitors a new perspective of Milwaukee.

Mystery Science Theater 3000 / facebook.com

More than 25 years ago, Wisconsin native Joel Hodgson and a handful of other funny people launched a TV show on a UHF station in the Twin Cities. Mystery Science Theater 3000 featured Hodgson as the good natured Joel Robinson, who was sent into space by two mad scientists and sentenced to watch bad movies.

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