Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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There is a plethora of empty storefront space in Milwaukee and business leaders see potential in it.

The Burleigh Street Community Development Corporation and the nearby Fondy / North Economic Development Corporation are each trying to convince prospective business owners that their respective neighborhoods are ideal locations to open up shop.

Fotolia, anyaberkut

Before the U.S. Supreme Court ends its session, it will rule on a case that could have a significant impact on health care in this country.

Brett Levin / Flickr

Members of a Milwaukee Common Council committee took up a proposal Thursday that could reduce the penalties for first-time offenses for possession of small amounts of marijuana. Advocates say reforms are needed to address disparities in how marijuana laws are enforced and their impact on offenders.

"When you look at the percentage of the population that is African-American versus the percentage of offenders who are actually being picked up by police in Milwaukee and prosecuted, there is a disparity there," says Public Policy Forum president Rob Henken.

Pfister Hotel

Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel is known around the country for a number of good reasons. It’s thought of as the city’s largest historic hotel – a throwback to the grand hotel palaces of a century ago. 

The Pfister also supports its very own narrator – a person who receives a one-year appointment to chronicle and share the stories of the hotel, its guests and employees. The hotel’s latest narrator happens to be an old friend of and occasional Lake Effect contributor.

michaeljung, Fotolia

Fifteen months ago, President Obama launched an initiative aimed at improving the outlook for boys and young men of color in the United States. The My Brother’s Keeper initiative was set up to bring both the public, private and faith-based sectors together to address issues ranging from early childhood education and high school graduation rates to issues surrounding incarceration and employment.

The Alan Parsons Project / facebook.com

It’s not uncommon for a successful rock musician to launch a second act as a record producer, putting to use the things he or she learned in the business. But by the time Alan Parsons found popularity with songs such as “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You” and “Eye in the Sky,” he had already built a reputation.

thecraigfergusonshow.com

David Letterman retired earlier this week after more than 30-years as a late night TV talk show host. Leading up to this week, many of the stories about Letterman's career pointed to his skill at deconstructing the very concept he was a part of.

shahfarshid, fotolia

Over the next 18 months or so, the state of US diplomacy will likely be under a microscope, thanks to the presidential campaign of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  But for all the headlines her role in foreign policy generated, there are hundreds of lesser-told stories of diplomacy at work.

Von Trier / facebook.com

Von Trier has been a popular Milwaukee night spot for years – a bar on the east side which manages to be both vibrant and old world at the same time.  But the story of how Von Trier came to exist is an interesting one.

Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr

Almost exactly a month from now, the climate for grocery shopping in southeastern Wisconsin will see some significant changes.

The first two Meijer stores in the state – in Grafton and Kenosha – will open their doors. The 190,000 square foot stores will feature the sorts of products you’d find at both a supermarket and also a retailer like Target, following the supercenter model.

Meijer seeks to be a one-stop shopping center and hopes that their company's philosophies will appeal to Wisconsinites and their Midwestern values.

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