Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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Ariel Dovas / Flickr

Milwaukee is in the midst of a violent spring. The number of murders is up significantly from this point a year ago, and non-fatal shootings have been front page news as children are hit by stray gunfire.

InPro, Facebook

The 45th commemoration of Earth Day is tomorrow, and all week we’re spotlighting some Wisconsinites and Wisconsin work linked to the environment and sustainability.

Last week, the Wisconsin DNR named a Muskego company as the latest Wisconsin business to attain so-called Green Tier status. But that designation is only the latest manifestation of a larger green strategy for InPro Corporation, which makes building products.

Ali Eminov

Since 2009, Little Free Libraries have grown from one in the front yard of a house in Wisconsin to over 25,000 little libraries in over 80 countries.

Todd Bol, from Hudson, built the first one six years ago as a memorial to his mother. Today, their popularity has soared far beyond the borders of Wisconsin. There are Little Free Libraries around the world.

Darren McCollester / Getty Images

As the debate over Governor Walker’s proposed budget continues in the Wisconsin legislature, the statewide story is getting an unprecedented amount of national coverage.

Meanwhile, Scott Walker’s probable presidential bid has led many local media outlets to turn reporters normally on a Wisconsin-specific beat into national political reporters.

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

As many had predicted for some time, Hillary Clinton finally, officially, threw her hat in the ring as a candidate for president in 2016.

That long-anticipated candidacy is, for some, more evidence of the rising stature of women in political life.  But Dorothy Thomas would contend there is a lot more to the prominence of women in society than any one candidate, or potential candidate.

gregtrine.com/stevenarntson.com

As anyone who’s spent time in a bookstore knows, there’s no such thing as just a “children’s book.” There are board books for the youngest readers, picture books, chapter books, young adult novels – and there’s middle-grade fiction.

In some ways, that last category is the hardest to define, because middle-graders themselves change so much in such a short period of time.

Miguelángel Guédez / Flickr

The brain is a funny thing. You could be listening to your favorite radio show, say, when something catches your eye. Before you realize it, your mind has wandered and you've lost track of what you were just listening to.

UW-Milwaukee researcher Debbie Hannula studies the very real impact of this phenomenon. In fact, Hannula, who is a professor of psychology at UWM, received a grant from the National Science Foundation to examine how memory affects your attention.

joshme17/Flickr

You were probably warned as a child to never combine water and electricity. The list of things not to do was impressive – don’t walk outside in a lightning storm, don’t plug in a hair dryer over a sink full of water. Essentially we were told some variation of "keep them far, far apart."

Well, Brooke Mayer didn’t get that message. Or if she did, she ignored it.

Workman Publishing

The English language is usually a pretty useful tool. Most of us don't have too much trouble finding a word to describe what we're talking about.

But it's a rapidly changing world in which we live, and ideas often come along that defy easy explanation. Like, say, the use of microscopic components to build machines, it's a concept called nanorobotics.

A new book by Lizzie  Skurnick is about neologisms, names for things that didn't have names before.

stewart-onan.com

It was on this date, exactly 90 years ago that one of the classics of American literature was published. The Great Gatsby cemented the place of F. Scott Fitzgerald in the American literary tradition, and helped make a celebrity of Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda.

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