Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Mary Bruton

Singer-songwriter Eliza Gilkyson has been recording music since Richard Nixon was President.  Over those 47 years, she has accumulated scores of songs written when she saw the world facing challenges.

Darlene Maternowski

The Milwaukee area is full of holiday traditions, from the downtown holiday lights display to the performances of The Nutcracker by the Milwaukee Ballet and A Christmas Carol at the Milwaukee Rep. Another holiday season tradition resides on the kitchen shelves of thousands in the Milwaukee area: We Energies' annual cookie book

Mitch Teich

President-elect Donald Trump made "repeal and replacement" of the Affordable Care Act a central talking point in his campaign.  Now that he's been elected, analysts and people covered by the act, referred to as Obamacare, are trying to anticipate how Trump's pledge will translate to reality.

Barbara Zabawa fits both those descriptions.  She's a Madison-based attorney, heading the Center for Health and Wellness Law - and she's covered by the ACA.  Zabawa says you can bet on one certainty in the months to come: change.

ChiccoDodiFC / Fotolia

Milwaukeeans looking for solutions to a tense climate between communities and the police force could look to the city of Cincinnati as an example. The area's population is comparable to Milwaukee, and has dealt with many of the same issues of mistrust between law enforcement and minority communities. 

But years of work in Cincinnati has led to a different climate. Their model for change is one that a group called the Community Coalition for Quality Policing would like to see implemented in Milwaukee.

Mitch Teich

The architect Frank Lloyd Wright is known worldwide for his distinctive buildings, often designed for well-heeled or prominent clients.  In Wisconsin alone, Wright's stamp can be found in the S.C. Johnson Wax and Wingspread facilities in Racine, Monona Terrace in Madison, and the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Wauwatosa.

BBC World Service / Flickr

The reverberations from the election of Donald Trump to the presidency are continuing to echo around Wisconsin, the country, and the world.  In fact, it seems people in other countries are having almost as many conversations about the historic 2016 election as in the United States. 

Claire Bolderson is a former BBC correspondent and now independent journalist who has covered numerous US elections and other momentous ballot issues, such as the Brexit vote earlier this year.  From London, she added her take on the election.

Mitch Teich

A guitar player receives a letter from a record company, saying his band's demo tape was very well-received, and asking the group to come in for a meeting.  Only problem is, the letter arrives 33 years late, and not surprisingly, the band has long split up.

Mitch Teich

People have been inundated with election coverage for months now, but it’s not just Americans who have been riveted to this historic campaign season. 

Many international journalists are in the United States both to cover the election and to learn more about federal elections in this country. As many casual observers have noticed, this has been an unusually contentious election cycle for the U.S. For some, the dirty politics at play in this election has reminded them of elections in their own countries. 

dany13 / Flickr

To many of us, the South Pacific seems like a slice of paradise: gentle trade winds, crystal clear water, lovely beaches. And that’s actually a pretty accurate picture of the Pacific, or at least it was, until around 1950.

Illustrations by Paige Clark
Courtesy of Jeanette Hurt/Seal Press

Traditionally, the tavern was a place where predominantly men went for fellowship and libations. Today, bars see a clientele pretty well divided between men and women, and the people serving the drinks are more likely to be women than ever before.

WorldSkills UK / Flickr

Forensic science has long been the basis for popular prime time television. From Jack Klugman’s classic Quincy character in the 1970s and '80s to the various versions of CSI, forensic science has peaked our cultural curiosity for decades. 

It turns out that reality is equally as interesting. Diana Johnson knows this firsthand. She has seen the work in real life, as a forensic scientist with the New Jersey State Police. Now, she teaches the next generation of forensic scientists at Marian University in Fond du Lac.

Mitch Teich

The sound of Adrian+Meredith can be described as an inspired "mash-up."

The guitar strums and vocal harmonies of Adrian Krygowski and his wife and musical partner Meredith draw on influences ranging from punk to jazz to the country music that surrounds them in Nashville, their current home.

thecraigfergusonshow.com

Leading up to his retirement, there were many stories about David Letterman's 30-years in late night TV, which pointed to his skill at deconstructing the very concept he was a part of.

meaganschultz.com

The death of a loved one is one of the hardest things for people to go through.  For expecting parents, the loss of an unborn child through miscarriage brings with it the pain of loss – and also dozens of other tough emotions.

A Milwaukee woman is working not to make the loss easier, per se, but to help women work through their grief.

Photo by Kevin Casey/NFLPhotoLibrary

It's hard to find a Wisconsin sports fan that doesn't have strong feelings about Brett Favre.  Some love him for his sixteen seasons of throwing touchdown passes for the Green Bay Packers.  Some are still smarting from the unceremonious way he left the Packers, and for his two seasons with the rival Minnesota Vikings.  And some are, well, strongly conflicted.

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