Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Sefton Ipock / Milwaukee Area Technical College

Tavis Smiley is something of a renaissance man. From modest beginnings in Indiana, Smiley worked briefly in politics for Los Angeles mayor Tom Bradley. Before long, he found a calling in broadcast media - first at the local level, then for a time at the cable channel Black Entertainment Television. 

Ballantine Books

The gulf between science and football might seem like a large one, but scientist and author Ainissa Ramirez would say they're more alike than you might imagine. Her latest book, Newton’s Football: The Science Behind America’s Gamelooks at the similarities between scientists and football fans.

l.madhavan / Flickr

As Earth Day approaches, Stacy Tornio of the Destination Nature has some suggestions for getting outside this week.  

1. Find Flowers

In early springtime, you can see daffodils, pacifica, tulips and lilacs. "Even though it's kind of bare out there, the flowers you do see are so bright and fresh and its makes you happy," says Tornio.

2. Earth Day of Service

Blue Rider Press

Baseball’s major league season is long, which is a good thing for some, annoying to others and a real grind to the people involved in it.

The Milwaukee Brewers enter this week with twelve games already in the books. If they were a football team that would represent three-quarters of their schedule. But this is baseball, so the Brewers are less than a tenth of the way to the finish line.

Victor / Flickr

About ten years ago, the name Frank Jude Jr. was a fixture in local news here. Jude won a substantial award after being the victim of a police beating outside a party thrown by a police officer in 2004.

And though Jude is no longer the high profile name that it once was, he has never faded entirely from the public scene. Nor have the controversy or legal issues around him.

CannonDesign

The Milwaukee Bucks agreed yesterday to a 30-year lease on the new arena, which they hope to begin construction on this summer. They’ll pay a minimum of a million dollars a year to the Wisconsin Center District. Meanwhile, another nearby project the Bucks are partnered with also took a step forward this week.

(Photo by Allen Kee / ESPN Images)

You can call ESPN2's "His & Hers" a lot of things: Distinctive. Fun. Boundary-pushing. But there's one term the hosts, Michael Smith and Jemele Hill, would prefer you don't use.

"It's not that 'debate' is necessarily a dirty word," Hill says, "but we like to think that we really pay attention to the nuance of discussions."

Kwame.Alexander.7 / Facebook

There are plenty of issues confronting sports in this country, but there is still a lot of beauty in the games we play at the amateur, collegiate and pro level. Author Kwame Alexander would say that it’s poetry.

Ask an elementary school student what his or her favorite part of school is, and there’s a decent chance that recess might be the answer. However as schools stress academics, the time reserved recess is increasingly the first to be taken away.

Jerry Schulman Photography

It’s been a busy season for political analysts. The cable news channels are wall-to-wall with campaign news, and NPR has featured live coverage of primary election nights in many states, including Wisconsin.

And of course it’s been a busy season for political satire. From Saturday Night Live to Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, there have been countless sketches blasting candidates on both sides of the aisle.

Fotolia, Ashok B. Mehta

While Americans have been going to the polls to start the complicated business of selecting a president, another leadership change is taking place this year. It’s the change of power in the leadership role at the United Nations. 

That transition will be watched closely by the members of the United Nations Association, a program of the UN Foundation. Chris Whatley is executive director of the US branch of the group, and he was in town recently to speak with members of the Milwaukee chapter and stopped by Lake Effect.

KosherSoul / Twitter

No matter what ethnicity you identify with, your cultural traditions almost certainly include food. It could be a traditional meal you eat at a holiday, or the foods you grew up eating at your grandparents’ house.

Ed Bierman / Flickr

The structural problems at the Mitchell Park Domes have been a reminder for many that Milwaukee County has responsibility for many cultural institutions in the area. Places such as the Milwaukee Public Museum, the zoo and the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, where you might go to see the symphony, ballet or a touring Broadway show.

Chris Hondros / Getty Images

Unlike other election years, the Middle East has not gotten a lot of attention as a campaign issue this season. There’s been some lingering talk of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s place in the Benghazi controversy, and some talk about the Iran nuclear deal, but largely the campaign has been about domestic issues.

Fotolia, nd700

If you’ve consulted a calendar lately, you know that it’s (technically) spring.  However, if you’ve looked out a window recently, you might beg to differ. But true spring will arrive in the Midwest soon with the temperatures in Wisconsin trending upward, albeit slowly.

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