Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

A pair of New Jersey radio hosts have apologized after they were suspended for referring to the state's Sikh attorney general as "turban man" during their Wednesday program.

WKXW-FM hosts Dennis Malloy and Judi Franco issued a written apology to Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal, who was appointed in January and is the first Sikh in the nation to hold such a post.

The commander of Iran's elite military Quds Force is warning President Trump that if the U.S. attacks his country, Tehran "will destroy all that you possess."

The comments by Major-General Qassem Soleimani, who heads the special forces unit of Iran's Revolutionary Guard, follow Trump's nearly all-caps tweet earlier this week directed at Iran's President Hassan Rouhani. In it, he warned that if Iran threatened the U.S. again, "YOU WILL SUFFER CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE."

Updated at 11:55 a.m. ET

At least two people have died as a fast-moving fire in Northern California jumped the Sacramento River and charged into the city of Redding, sending residents fleeing ahead of the flames late Thursday. The Carr Fire has burned more than 44,000 acres and was only 3 percent contained as of Friday morning.

What are believed to be the remains of some 55 U.S. servicemen killed in the Korean War have arrived in South Korea aboard a U.S. Air Force transport plane from the North in accordance with an agreement made last month between President Trump and Kim Jong Un at their summit in Singapore.

"A U.S. Air Force C-17 aircraft containing remains of fallen service members has departed Wonsan, North Korea," the White House said in a statement late Thursday.

Updated at 5:45 a.m. ET

An explosive device was detonated near the U.S. Embassy in Beijing on Thursday, but there were no immediate reports of injuries other than the man suspected in the blast, according to Chinese and U.S. Embassy officials.

Witnesses described white smoke rising from the street, as paramilitary police guarding the embassy rushed to the scene of the explosion.

Australia's Fairfax Media, publisher of The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, has agreed to a US$3 billion merger with Nine Entertainment Co. – a deal, if approved, that would create a multi-platform empire amid concerns over the country's rapidly consolidating media market.

Georgia's Trump-Pence endorsed Secretary of State Brian Kemp has won a run-off election against fellow Republican Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle for the chance to face voters in November to become the state's next governor.

Cagle, who was endorsed by outgoing Gov. Nathan Deal, was the favorite of the state's Republican establishment. He also heavily outspent Kemp, whose embrace of the president's brand of politics paid off.

With 100 percent of the votes counted, Kemp won by 69 percent to Cagle's 30 percent.

Georgia state Rep. Jason Spencer — who bared his buttocks and yelled racial slurs on camera in an episode of Sacha Baron Cohen's satirical Showtime series Who Is America? — will resign from the legislature despite an earlier insistence that he would stay.

A spokesman for Georgia House Speaker David Ralston told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution late Tuesday that Spencer would step down.

A federal judge has ordered the release of an Ecuadorean immigrant detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials last month and held for deportation after he delivered a pizza to a U.S. Army installation in Brooklyn.

U.S. District Judge Paul Crotty ordered the release of Pablo Villavicencio, 35, from the Hudson County Correctional Facility in New Jersey. Villavicencio, who is married to a U.S. citizen, applied for a green card in February and is scheduled for an immigration interview next month.

Updated at 2:55 a.m. ET

Lao media report that 19 people are dead and 49 believed missing in southern Laos after an unfinished hydroelectric dam collapsed, releasing a wall of water that inundated downstream villages.

Rescuers searched amid submerged homes, many with people perched on rooftops in an effort to escape the floodwaters after Monday's collapse of a dam that is part of the Xepian-Xe Nam Noy hydropower project in southeastern Attapeu province near neighboring Cambodia.

Key Taliban figures are reportedly among a dozen militants killed in an Afghan army operation over the weekend in the country's northeastern Kapisa province.

The Associated Press reports that "Sharin Aqa Faqiri, army spokesman for northeast Afghanistan, said Mullah Nasim Mushfaq, the Taliban shadow governor for Kapisa, and Qari Esanullah, shadow district chief for Tagab, were among those killed late Sunday night."

The report came as at least two rockets hit the Afghan capital on Tuesday, with one hitting a residential area, wounding four people, according to officials.

Updated at 3:15 a.m. ET

South Korea says it plans to scale back the number of guard posts along its tense border with North Korea and withdraw some military equipment. The move comes amid talks with the U.S. over how much Seoul should pay for its own defense.

The announcement comes as an expert on North Korea's weapons program reports that Pyongyang has begun dismantling key facilities at a satellite launching station in fulfillment of a pledge by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un last month at the Singapore summit with President Trump.

Police have arrested a Brazilian plastic surgeon known as "Dr. Bumbum" after a patient undergoing a procedure on her buttocks suddenly died.

Dr. Bumbum, whose real name is Denis Cesar Barros Furtado, enjoys a huge fan base on social media in Brazil. He was arrested by police in Rio de Janiero on Thursday after five days on the run.

Police say the exact cause of the death of the patient, identified as 46-year-old bank manager Lilian Calixto, has not been determined.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

Seventeen people are dead after an amphibious tourist boat carrying 31 people capsized and sank Thursday during a severe squall in a lake in southern Missouri.

The Ride the Ducks Branson boat sank on Table Rock Lake near the resort town of Branson on Thursday. Divers worked through the night on rescue and recovery operations. On Friday morning, the county sheriff told reporters that all the bodies had been found, bringing the death toll to 17.

British police examining CCTV footage have reportedly identified multiple Russian suspects believed to have carried out the March nerve-agent attack on former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

The Skripals were found slumped on a bench at a shopping center in Salisbury, in southern England, on March 4. Subsequent investigation indicated they were poisoned by a nerve agent of the type Novichok, a group of deadly chemicals developed in the Soviet Union in the 1970s and 80s.

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