Teran Powell

Eric Von Fellow

Teran Powell joined WUWM in the fall of 2017 as the station’s very first Eric Von Fellow.

Teran began her journalism career during her years as a student at Marquette University. She worked as a reporter for Marquette student media and the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service covering local events and community activists. She has also freelanced for the Shepherd Express and worked as a show editor for Fox 6 News.

A Chicago native, Teran’s passion for journalism lies within being up close and personal with people in the community and the happenings that affect them directly. With a genuine passion for storytelling, Teran’s goal is to tell the stories that need to be told.

Jesse Lee/Marquette University

There have been more than 300 drug-related deaths in Milwaukee County this year.

Dozens of people concerned about the opioid crisis gathered for a discussion about solutions at Marquette University.

Experts at the event say there are many factors that contribute to the growing epidemic. They say the problem isn’t going to go away, but there are tools being used to make significant progress.

Erin Toner

Update:

Wisconsin's Elections Commission is beefing up its security measures in the wake of Russian hacking attempts in the 2016 presidential election. During a meeting in Madison Monday, the commission disclosed a draft of its plan to ensure all parties involved with elections are aware of proper security measures.

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Some Democratic lawmakers are renewing a push to legalize medical marijuana. They say the move could keep people from using -- and perhaps becoming hooked on -- opioid painkillers. The fate of the proposal is uncertain, though, as long as Republicans control the Legislature.

Democratic state lawmakers trying to gain support to legalize medical marijuana held hearings in five cities this fall. Senator Jon Erpenbach and Representative Chris Taylor wanted to give the public a chance to share their thoughts about the proposal.

Megan Dobyns

Update: 

The Milwaukee Common Council voted 10-5 Tuesday to override the mayor's veto of a resolution that would give aldermen the authority to fire the Police Chief.

The move doesn't give the council a green light to remove Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn from office. Rather, they would have to approve his firing, with a two-thirds vote. And, before that could take place, state lawmakers would also need to take action.

Alderman Bob Donovan was in the majority. And, before the vote, he said the city is in need of change.

Sharyn Morrow, Flickr

Milwaukee County is in the midst of an opioid crisis. City officials and medical professionals say the lack of available funds in Milwaukee County to address substance abuse can be a roadblock to creating effective treatment and education. 

On Thursday, President Donald Trump deemed the opioid crisis as a public health emergency and said that he plans to put a lot of time, effort and money into eliminating the crisis.

WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

Overdoses from heroin and prescription painkillers are killing thousands of people around the country. In Milwaukee County alone, more than 270 died from drug overdoses in the first eight months of this year. Recently, 11 people passed away over a four-day period. 

A number of efforts have been launched to fight the problem. They include a task force the City of Milwaukee and Milwaukee County created about six months ago, which seeks to fight the abuse of heroin, opioid painkillers and cocaine.

Teran Powell

While Wisconsin's job creation agency hasn't yet finalized a contract with Foxconn, the company has started posting job openings. And it held a recruiting event at Marquette University this week.

TV screens and smart boards grabbed the attention of students walking through the second floor rotunda of the university’s union. The displays belonged to Foxconn, which visited to introduce the company to campus and to recruit workers.

MU Spokesman Chris Jenkins says the university wants to connect students with Foxconn.

Teran Powell

Grocery stores tend to be scarce in some of Milwaukee’s poorest neighborhoods. 

People may have to travel miles to buy fresh produce, meat and dairy products, because they live in what’s known as a food desert.

The USDA defines a food desert as a low-income area where at least one-third of residents live more than a mile from the nearest big grocery store.

But efforts, such as the new Pete’s Fruit Market and a mobile market by Pick 'n Save, are helping to make fresh food available in areas that need it most.