Lake Effect

Airs Weekdays at 10 am and 10 pm & Weekends at 3 pm

Lake Effect, WUWM’s locally-produced magazine program, covers a lot of ground, focusing on your neighbors and your issues. From discussing politics and the economy to spotlighting Wisconsin authors and musicians, Lake Effect goes beyond the headlines. Join the Lake Effect team as they open a window onto life in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.

This Weekend on Lake Effect: 

We hear from UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone about how the university is planning for the future. Then, we learn how Near West Side Partners are working with businesses in their neighborhoods. Plus, an essay about mindfulness. And our auto contributor reminds us to care for our cars while we shelter at home.

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Friday on Lake Effect

We explore ways the Wisconsin Election Commission could improve mail-in voting and avoid the issues we saw in the April 7 primary. Then, we look at the future of the Democratic National Convention and the possibility of a partly virtual convention. Our Fit For You series features a former doctor who is committing himself to walking 125 miles in 10 days for a cause. Plus, a local doctor talks about his experience teaching medical students during COVID-19, outside of a hospital.

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Thursday on Lake Effect: 

We look at the different ways communities memorialize mass shootings in Wisconsin. Researchers have found the virus that causes COVID-19 in wastewater, we learn how that’s impacting sewage treatment. Our auto contributor reminds us not to forget about our cars while we shelter at home. Plus, we look at the efforts to regulate CBD products.

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Wednesday on Lake Effect:

We have a first hand account of what it’s like to be a COVID-19 survivor in Milwaukee. Then astronomy contributor Jean Creighton talks about a new black hole discovery. Plus, we learn how Near West Side Partners are working with businesses in their neighborhoods, as they look to the future.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect: 

We hear from UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone about how the university is planning for the future and how they’re dealing with the fallout from the pandemic. Then, we continue the conversation on how indigenous people have managed the coronavirus and past pandemics. Plus, Milwaukee Record’s Tyler Maas tells us about Wisconsin’s nearly 30 state symbols and icons.

Guests:

  • Mark Mone, UW-Milwaukee Chancellor
  • Heather Brugel, indigenous historian and writer
  • Tyler Maas, co-founder of Milwaukee Record

Monday on Lake Effect:

A virologist discusses COVID-19 and the impact of safer-at-home orders which seemed to be working in Wisconsin. Then, we hear how indigenous farming practices have proven to be a sign of resilience — not only in the face of genocide, but also during a global pandemic. Then, Madison children’s book author Pat Zietlow Miller talks about her new story, My Brother The Duck. Plus, how a family of great horned owls in Shorewood is giving families a break from the pandemic. 

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This weekend on Lake Effect: 

We learn how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting the meat industry. Bubbler Talk looks at how food pantries have adjusted during the pandemic. Then, a local distiller talks about the transition to making hand sanitizer to help ease the nation-wide shortage. Plus a tribute to improvisation master and UW-Madison jazz instructor Joan Wildman who passed away last month.

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Friday on Lake Effect

We unpack what the state Supreme Court’s ruling on the statewide safer-at-home order means for Wisconsinites. Contributor Kyle Cherek talks about the stark changes and shifting reality the hospitality industry faces. Plus, we learn how cats may be able to spread the coronavirus.

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Thursday on Lake Effect

We hear from several artists who are calling last month’s in-person primary election a “Crime Against Humanity.” Then, a new journaling project from the Wisconsin Historical Society seeks to show how everyday people are experiencing this pandemic. An anti-vaping advocate shares his experience with addiction. Plus, an essayist compares the coronavirus pandemic to experiences during the Great Depression.

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Wednesday on Lake Effect: 

We explore the latest Marquette Law School poll, which asked Wisconsinites how they feel about the coronavirus pandemic. We look into new reporting that has shown spikes in gun violence during the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, a local distiller talks about the transition to making hand sanitizer to help ease the nationwide shortage.

Guests:

  • Maayan Silver, WUWM reporter
  • Champe Barton, reporter for The Trace
  • Brian Sammons, owner and distiller at Twisted Path Distillery

Tuesday on Lake Effect:

We hear from a vocational teacher who has had to adjust how he’s preparing students to enter the workforce. Then, in the high stress time of COVID-19, we look at ways health care workers can take care of themselves. And as we mark the ten year anniversary of the Affordable Care Act, we discuss the impact it has had on health care in the U.S. 

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Monday on Lake Effect

We learn about employee rights during this pandemic and how workers can navigate an evolving workplace. Then, we learn how the coronavirus is affecting the meat industry and what it means for our food system in the U.S. Plus, a tribute to improvisation master and UW-Madison jazz instructor Joan Wildman, who passed away last month.

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This weekend on Lake Effect:

We have a first hand account of what it’s like to be a COVID-19 survivor in Milwaukee. Bubbler Talk looks at how the pandemic is affecting students with special needs. We talk about how the coronavirus has reawakened some longstanding debates on the nature of our government. Plus, a project by local arts organizations is putting masks and face shields in the hands of frontline workers.

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Friday on Lake Effect

How one Milwaukee man is showing appreciation for the city’s essential workers. Then, we hear about how social media companies are balancing free speech ethics under coronavirus. Plus, our film contributor discusses what the closing of movie theaters during the pandemic could mean for their future.

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Thursday on Lake Effect

We look at how the COVID-19 pandemic may affect Wisconsin’s county budgets. Then, while addiction treatment and recovery has drastically changed due to social distancing, it’s also opened up more opportunities to connect. And we hear from two organizations helping artists get through the pandemic — creatively and financially.

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