Lake Effect

Airs Weekdays at 10 am and 10 pm & Weekends at 3 pm

Lake Effect, WUWM’s locally-produced magazine program, covers a lot of ground, focusing on your neighbors and your issues. From discussing politics and the economy to spotlighting Wisconsin authors and musicians, Lake Effect goes beyond the headlines. Join the Lake Effect team as they open a window onto life in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.

Wednesday on Lake Effect:

Milwaukee doctors discuss why some urban physicians are experiencing burn out. Then, a group of stakeholders thinks about the present and the future of the Milwaukee River Greenway. Later, a conversation with the man conducting the orchestra for the Milwaukee Ballet's production of Swan Lake. Plus, Wisconsin writer, Rebecca Brown, talks about her latest novel and her unlikely inspirations.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect:

We talk with Wisconsin native Bill Siemering. He's one of the people who shaped NPR and its signature show, All Things Considered, and learn about the formative days of the network. Later, our How Did You Do That? podcast examines the business of investing in business. And cartoonist - and Milwaukee native - Paul Noth says Charles Schulz’s Peanuts was like the gateway drug for him and others in his generation.

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Monday on Lake Effect

A new book looks at how the U.S. government subsidized segregation in cities throughout the country. Then, a local cardiologist explains why there are some things more vital to his practice than research. Plus, the Pulitzer-prize winning author of The Underground Railroad discusses why he refused to sanitize the brutal reality of American slavery. 

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This weekend on Lake Effect

A new study showcases the role so-called “small-batch manufacturing” has on the local business climate. Then, the son of the late Kenyan photojournalist Mohamed Amin explains why he chose Milwaukee’s Chip Duncan to curate the world’s first exhibit of his late father’s work. Plus, the latest edition in our storytelling series, Ex Fabula.

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Friday on Lake Effect:

A new report out by the Wisconsin Policy Forum sheds a concerning light on the budget situation at Milwaukee Public Schools. Then, Ray Jivoff looks back on his first year as the artistic director of the Skylight Music Theatre and its current production of Urinetown. Plus, Lake Effect film contributor, Dave Luhrssen, talks about the latest addition to the Star Wars franchise, Solo.

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Thursday on Lake Effect:

We learn about the effort to increase the number of Latino people in executive and managerial roles in Milwaukee companies. Later, a former refugee living in Minnesota discusses his work, helping refugees better establish identities. Our astronomy contributor explains how Wisconsin's native tribes viewed the night sky, and our cheese contributor shares some suggestions for great, summer cheeses.

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Wednesday on Lake Effect:

A new report explores how the use of body-worn cameras affects the work of the Milwaukee Police Department.  Later, why a national organization is stepping up to help the work of the Walnut Way Conservation Corp. We speak with Wisconsin writer J.F. Riordan about the latest in her series of novels set on Washington Island.  And an in-studio performance by the Milwaukee band, Various Small Fires, a group that's a throwback to brass-infused 1970s pop.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect:

Although much of the recent Wisconsin business news has focused on Foxconn, a new study showcases the role so-called “small-batch manufacturing” has on the local business climate. Then, why the son of the late Kenyan photojournalist Mohamed Amin chose Milwaukee’s Chip Duncan to curate the world’s first exhibit of his late father’s work at the Charles Allis Museum. And singer-songwriter Caitlin Canty switched her focus from biology to songwriting, and performs for us in Studio C1.

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Monday on Lake Effect:

We take a walk around the rejuvenated Westlawn Gardens, a transformed public housing neighborhood on Milwaukee's northwest side. Then, we learn how practicing Buddhism helped former white supremacist Arno Michaelis transform his life away from hate. Plus this month's Fit For You picks up a kettlebell.

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This weekend on Lake Effect:

Following the fire in a historic downtown church, we look at how these religious structures have shaped Milwaukee life for generations. Then, film critic Dave Luhrssen also looks at religion - in the new film Disobedience, a story of forbidden love in an orthodox Jewish community. Radio Chipstone tells the story of a library sciences student who decided to take a course in material culture, and we'll have the latest edition of our storytelling series Ex Fabula.

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Friday on Lake Effect:

Writer Zach Brooke talks about the philosophy that guides Reggie Moore and the Office of Violence Prevention that he heads. Then, a look ahead to this weekend and celebrations of two groups of important pollinators: bees and migratory birds. Following the death of an influential French chef, Paul Bartolotta reflects on why the French have such an outsized role in food. Plus comedy writer, Milwaukee-native, and Marquette graduate Jeannie Gaffigan reflects on a lifetime of humor ahead of her commencement speech at Marquette this weekend.

Coutesy of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

The viola, like the accordion and the banjo, is often the butt of musical jokes. Not as dramatic as its string cousins the violin or the cello, the viola nevertheless has a beautiful sound and is a crucial part of orchestras and chamber music ensembles.

Thursday on Lake Effect:

A Milwaukee university extends a helping hand to students with autism spectrum disorders to help them navigate the college experience. Then we learn how the Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers focuses specifically on bike use and more frequent exercise among the people it serves. Plus the MSO’s principal violist Robert Levine reveals why he chose the viola all those years ago.

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Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers

In cities like Milwaukee, there are barriers to healthy living for many residents in neighborhoods with challenging economic conditions, such as the near south side. Organizations such as the Sixteenth Street Community Health Center exist to help area residents navigate those barriers.

Tatiana Maida is the Sixteenth Street Healthy Choices Department Manager. She says key obstacles to healthy living are the lack of healthy foods and safe outside spaces where people can freely exercise and engage with their community.

Wednesday on Lake Effect:

Israeli doctors give some insight into their work with people who continue to live in war-torn Syria. We learn how partnerships are allowing the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center to learn about the history of its land. Then, the founder of Express Yourself Milwaukee talks about using the arts to reach kids in a variety of challenging settings, including prison. Plus, mystery novelist Patricia Skalka talks about the surprise inspiration for her latest Door County mystery.

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